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Great Music, Bizarre Ideology - 80%

thejoker, July 20th, 2011

When I saw the title of this disc, it was an immediate "eye-roller" for me. I mean, "2P3: Alchemists Earth of Aeon A.C."? Seriously? Albums like this, at least judging by the cover, just reek of that horrible Dimmu tendency to inflate songs to their maximum pomposity, and I can't think of anything more irritating.

Regardless, it's actually a decent disc - in fact, more than decent. After a short and actually quite beautiful sounding piano-laced intro, the band descends into utter technical madness with "Christian Anarchism" - we're talking a brutal assault here. The instrumentation is beyond excellent, all done by the guy formerly of that rank little outfit known as Verdelger, with a shrieker known as Kildrith letting it rip without let up for most of the disc.

There are a few breaks in between the hyper-technical riffing and ridiculously angry sounding freak-outs - take "Prognostication of Victorious Travail" for instance, a clean-sounding yet melancholy take on the Lord's Prayer.

What I found to be a problem with this album was not so much the music as the ideology of the band itself. In the booklet's lyrics, references to a controversial figure named K. Hovind abound (a conspiracy-theory pastor who thinks the world's about 6000 years old or less, along with a bunch of other bizarre theories about pyramids and the like). As a Christian, it's rather embarrassing to see people that can make intelligent music like this and yet still succumb to fundamentalist idiocy in their message.

That, and if you look closely at the cover of the album, their anti-Catholic message is quite clear (which they've also made known in interviews) - note the statue of the Virgin Mary alongside pictures of Hitler, Stalin, Darwin (as if Darwin was somehow a tyrant like the other two), and the like. Just another attempt to divide Christians of any denomination, and a sad one at that.

Back to the music though - if hyper-technical stuff is your thing, buy this album. I'd recommend it definitely over the bombastic approach of bands like Nepesh, as it does have some bells and whistles going on in the music. If you can ignore the bizarre nature of their message, it's some great-sounding stuff for sure.