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Electric Death
Metal newbie

Joined: Wed May 13, 2015 4:38 pm
Posts: 119
PostPosted: Fri Sep 08, 2017 3:27 am 
 

What metal albums would you consider "artistic?" Albums that you could imagine somebody from the artsy side of things can enjoy despite not being a metalhead? I'm thinking of a metal equivalent of Dave Brubeck's Take Five. It's a jazz album you can imagine someone who doesn't listen to jazz often but is able to appreciate the artistic value of it.

I can imagine the proggier side of metal could fall under this. The first that pops into my mind is Ihsahn's After. The track "The Barren Lands" has an ethereal feel to it.

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jjohn
Metal newbie

Joined: Sat Aug 19, 2017 11:30 am
Posts: 42
Location: Greece/France
PostPosted: Fri Sep 08, 2017 3:44 am 
 

Yes!
After is my favourite album of all time.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
This one is excellent too

https://averse.bandcamp.com/album/the-endesque-chants

I mentioned Averse in the EP thread yesterday, but they very much deserve mentioning every day

The three main songs are huge and comprise of lengthy artistic prog-rock sections culminating with black metal bursts and vice versa.

You cannot love prog and not fal in love with this album.
~~
Dar De Duh by Dordeduh is certainly worth mentioning as it's a great album but it gets too extreme at times so maybe I wouldn't recommend it as a first listen to someone who's not much experienced with black metal.
~~~
Everything by Thy Catafalque too bar the first two albums should be great!!
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Hayisforhorses
Metalhead

Joined: Wed Jul 05, 2006 11:47 am
Posts: 698
Location: United Kingdom
PostPosted: Fri Sep 08, 2017 4:36 am 
 

Had a few arty friends who werent into metal but dug jazz, avant-garde classical, world music and ambient/noise music and they dug the shit out of Burzum especially Hvis Lyset Tar Oss and Filosofem

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ratrace
Metal newbie

Joined: Wed Jan 28, 2015 4:30 am
Posts: 208
PostPosted: Fri Sep 08, 2017 3:27 pm 
 

Sculptured - Apollo Ends is a masterwork and still is after all those years...

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IamDBR
Metalhead

Joined: Wed Jul 06, 2016 2:58 am
Posts: 1394
PostPosted: Fri Sep 08, 2017 3:52 pm 
 

I think experimental, dissonant stuff like Gorguts, Ulcerate, Krallice, Deathspell Omega can be considered artsy. Challenging musically, hipster friendly from an aesthetic standpoint, serious/intellectual themes etc.

Akercocke, Voices, Septicflesh for dramatic, theatrical side of the spectrum. The neat attire/costumes help too, I guess.

Gridlink's Longhena is probably the most artsy thing in grindcore.

Lykathea Aflame is another one. Making bdm vibrant, expressive & proggy is a feat in itself.

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blackmantram
Metal newbie

Joined: Sun Apr 25, 2010 12:51 pm
Posts: 232
Location: Colombia
PostPosted: Fri Sep 08, 2017 4:18 pm 
 

Hayisforhorses wrote:
Had a few arty friends who werent into metal but dug jazz, avant-garde classical, world music and ambient/noise music and they dug the shit out of Burzum especially Hvis Lyset Tar Oss and Filosofem


Yeah, I completely agree on burzum being listened by people who aren't even into metal but more on the 'artsy' side of music. I remember this dude who were an avid collector of avant-garde, ambient, industrial and whatnot, he liked stuff such as coil, brian eno, morricone and burzum. I also kind of remember someone who liked krautrock and horror films soundtracks praising burzum as brilliant music or something like that.
I don't know if this applies but there are some artists outside metal that have been known to like burzum, anna von hausswolff is one of them.

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Twisted_Psychology
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Joined: Sat May 16, 2009 8:22 pm
Posts: 3652
Location: United States
PostPosted: Fri Sep 08, 2017 4:46 pm 
 

It probably doesn't quite fit your definition but Bruce Dickinson's The Chemical Wedding is the first thing that comes to mind when I think of "artistic" metal. The way the guitar tone works with the William Blake-themed lyrics really gives the album an esoteric feel that you don't see with a lot of classic metal.

I could also see artsy people getting into Acid Bath, especially for the Southern macabre-themed lyrics and aesthetic.
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Natskygge
Metal newbie

Joined: Mon Jul 09, 2012 1:49 am
Posts: 66
Location: Denmark
PostPosted: Sat Sep 09, 2017 6:53 am 
 

A friend of mine is a classsically trained musician and he does not usually listen to metal - at least not of the traditional kind. But one day he asked if I could recommend any "weird" metal. Of the ones I suggested, he really liked Virus and Ved Buens Ende. I also mentioned Dødheimsgard but he couldn't stand the drum sound. (He was the first person, outside of Norwegian musicians, I've met in RL who said "I can't stand the triggered drums!")
I can't remember if I suggested other bands to him. But the pieces he plays himself is also more of the avantgarde or experimental sort.

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Five_Nails
Metal newbie

Joined: Fri Dec 14, 2007 1:34 pm
Posts: 313
PostPosted: Sat Sep 09, 2017 7:36 am 
 

I hope the following isn't too far from what you're looking for.

Sagittarius is a calm, quiet neoclassical band that's featured on MA. I got the album "Die Grosse Marina" years ago but never really listened to it until a couple of months ago. This album is written as a companion piece to a novella from the first half of the Twentieth Century, but this musician's later music also covers stuff like "Transylvanian Hunger" with a more Germanic and folksy flair among a series of ancient and traditional themes that capture continental European essence.

One song on "Die Grosse Marina" is a slowed down version of "Moonlight Sonata", but later on in the album "Fragmente II" he does the song at regular speed with a reading of a poem written by Stanislaus Eric Stenbock in 1883 that was originally written as a companion piece to Beethoven's music.

I like this musician's take on making a literary and musical bridge because usually movies don't do it for me after reading a book, but hearing the right sounds can make things stick better without distorting the images I imagine when I'm reading. That's what makes it tough about watching the movie adaptation of a book. I learned that all too well with some franchises that I fell in love with as a kid. It's a soft spot for me because literature can be so musical and well-paced when you really hunker down into reading, so having a sound put to a silent piece of art really works for me.

This first song is the title track for the aforementioned album, "Die Grosse Marina".
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nnJC5SWQdb4

Another song that really perks up my ears up is "Der Heautontimorumenos" from "Fragmente III".
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qp21qB2h4FA

This last song was from the musician's first "Fragmente" demo, which I can't find any downloads for, but there's still a video on YouTube for this song. It's a cover of a song by the band, Current 93 (that I really know nothing about), and it far surpasses the original with such a deadpan delivery, cavernous ambiance, and fantastic piano rhythm. It really makes the drop of the last lyrical line of the fourth stanza stand out when he says "the foxes stop running" while the piano runs the last of its route.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TjhNgR7e9x0

I like this guy's music because, from what I've heard, it's really a lot of appreciation going on while he tries to show it with his own skill set. A lack of politics and the fact that there's usually no big message to push in it just makes it that much more enjoyable. It's simple, quiet, contemplative, and a good break from the noisier, fuller, and pushier music that I usually listen to.

Also, you can download most of his music from his bandcamp. https://sagittarius.bandcamp.com/

Great musician, Waldner definitely deserves some serious exposure.


Last edited by Five_Nails on Sat Sep 09, 2017 7:51 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Empyreal
The Final Frontier

Joined: Thu Nov 30, 2006 6:58 pm
Posts: 25605
Location: Where the dead rule the night
PostPosted: Sat Sep 09, 2017 7:42 am 
 

Pharaoh's Be Gone and Bury the Light are my picks - super erudite, complex material that's also heavy and intense enough for metalheads. The articulation and melodicism in the music, and the beautifully written lyrics, make them top picks for intelligent metal music.

Kamelot's Black Halo is another. The level of dynamics and the way they just make everything so clean and precise, yet so intense, is wonderful, and the songs are more complex than they initially seem, lots of layers. Roy Khan is just a delight too.
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RapeTheDead
Metalhead

Joined: Tue Mar 16, 2010 10:48 pm
Posts: 754
Location: Canada
PostPosted: Sat Sep 09, 2017 9:42 am 
 

I love Be Gone, but I wouldn't really say it fits the thread much at all. It's not really composed in an "artsy" way if that makes sense, it's just got tons of tasty riffs. Kamelot I agree with though. They're one of the very few metal bands that I would say sound genuinely..."symphonic", for lack of a better term. Layers out the ass.

Maybe I'm interpreting this a different way, but I see off-the-wall brutal death metal like Neoandertals and Enmity being "artistic". The strange, abstract approach to aesthetic and composition of both bands is something that makes me go "hmmm" while stroking my beard and nodding my head. Also Through The Cervix of Hawwah is a great candidate for this type of thing as well.

For a slightly different take, Obtained Enslavement's Witchraft is grandiose. It's like the album was composed rather than written, if that makes sense. The intricacy is remarkable.
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Empyreal
The Final Frontier

Joined: Thu Nov 30, 2006 6:58 pm
Posts: 25605
Location: Where the dead rule the night
PostPosted: Sat Sep 09, 2017 2:45 pm 
 

RapeTheDead wrote:
I love Be Gone, but I wouldn't really say it fits the thread much at all. It's not really composed in an "artsy" way if that makes sense, it's just got tons of tasty riffs.


Nah, the songs are super well written the melodies intertwined with those riffs make it artistic enough for this thread for my taste. It's more complex than just a ton of tasty riffs - the song construction is marvelous. They have a lot of stuff going on but it's super focused.
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Kveldulfr
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Joined: Thu Feb 16, 2012 12:01 pm
Posts: 3698
Location: Nowhere
PostPosted: Sat Sep 09, 2017 3:38 pm 
 

Natskygge wrote:
A friend of mine is a classsically trained musician and he does not usually listen to metal - at least not of the traditional kind. But one day he asked if I could recommend any "weird" metal. Of the ones I suggested, he really liked Virus and Ved Buens Ende. I also mentioned Dødheimsgard but he couldn't stand the drum sound. (He was the first person, outside of Norwegian musicians, I've met in RL who said "I can't stand the triggered drums!")
I can't remember if I suggested other bands to him. But the pieces he plays himself is also more of the avantgarde or experimental sort.


The whole Czral/Vikotnik school of avantgarde Norwegian metal is great and totally fits this thread. Virus, DHG, Ved Buens Ende, Code, Manes and related acts like Fleurety, Arcturus, Age of Silence, Solefald... All great and innovative stuff.
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Rippingheadache
Metalhead

Joined: Fri Jul 07, 2006 7:42 pm
Posts: 681
Location: Vietnam
PostPosted: Sat Sep 09, 2017 4:00 pm 
 

I feel a lot of bands from labels such as Dark Descent, Iron Bonehead and Profound Lore fall under this label. Bands that put out great music, but bolstered by a supremely confident sense of aesthetics and style. Also, now that I think about it, Relapse is another label that adopts a consistent art-house look to their albums. My favorite examples are:

Volahn - Aq'ab'al
Mitochondrion - Parasignosis
Blood Incantation - Starspawn
Jesu - Conqueror
Flourishing - The Sum of All Fossils
Kayo Dot - Hubardo
Bolzer - Aura

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HeavenDuff
Metalhead

Joined: Sun Mar 07, 2010 10:35 pm
Posts: 871
Location: Quebec, Canada
PostPosted: Sat Sep 09, 2017 4:20 pm 
 

I'm surprised that Agalloch's The Mantle was not mentioned yet.

It's a great metal album, but it's also very eclectic, and it draws influences from a ton of different musical genres including post-rock, gothic rock, doom metal, black metal, neofolk and ambient. There is a very artsty approach to it, with a very contemplative and immersive feeling to the whole thing.

Their track In The Shadow of our Pale Companion is still highly praised by their fans and by a lot of people who aren't really into metal music.
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Xymosys
Metal newbie

Joined: Sat Apr 09, 2011 9:19 am
Posts: 135
Location: Croatia
PostPosted: Mon Sep 11, 2017 9:54 am 
 

hmn...Tiamat's Wildhoney comes in my mind..and later one - A Deeper Kind Of Slumber...
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