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Osmiumthemetal
Metal newbie

Joined: Tue May 24, 2016 10:30 pm
Posts: 85
PostPosted: Thu Sep 20, 2018 10:05 pm 
 

Budgie was and is a criminally overlooked band from both a quality and relevance perspective. Probably only second to Sabbath and Purple when it comes to influence to metal overall really. Priest wouldn't have been the same without Budgie, if you don't believe me, just listen to the second half of "You're the Biggest Thing Since Powdered Milk" and then "Deceiver" for one example. Metallica have already displayed their gratitude to Budgie with their cover of "Breadfan" but I've heard that one of the primary reasons for Metallica forming in the first place was their shared appreciation of Budgie. Those are just two bands affected by Budgie.

Budgie was similar to Sabbath, a gloomy and sludgy power trio, but they had a progressive spin from the beginning (not that Sabbath didn't all the same) with long instrumental passages and twisting structures along with strange themes and titles that seemed more Zappa-esque than most hard rock of the day. Unlike other early metal contemporaries like Sabbath and Purple, they largely faded away over time. Their early records are still very engaging and very well written and played. It's really a pity that they're not more recognized since metal as a whole would be radically different without them.

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narsilianshard
Metalhead

Joined: Fri Aug 14, 2009 12:22 pm
Posts: 1939
PostPosted: Fri Sep 21, 2018 12:42 am 
 

I just read Mustaine's book and he claimed that the sign of a true metalhead in the early 80s was listening to Budgie. Part of why he joined Metallica is because they listed them as influences as you mentioned. Nowadays it seems Thin Lizzy gets more credit for their influence on the early heavy metal scene, but Budgie feel like they should be listed right up there.

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KrigareTjovane
Metal newbie

Joined: Mon Mar 18, 2013 2:06 am
Posts: 80
PostPosted: Fri Sep 21, 2018 12:57 am 
 

Absolutely love Budgie. Bandolier and In For the Kill are masterpieces and deserve to be repeatedly heard by everybody with even a passing interest in 70s metal. There's really nothing else out there like them, at least that I've heard.

I know it's old hat to compare Budgie to Rush, but I like to think Budgie is what Rush could have sounded like had they continued in the vein of their debut and got heavier and heavier as the 70s went along (you can argue they still did, but not quite in the same direction either way).

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HaPoStaPu
Mallcore Kid

Joined: Mon Jul 16, 2018 9:20 am
Posts: 29
Location: Armenia
PostPosted: Fri Sep 21, 2018 3:10 am 
 

I've tried to listen to a Best of the other day, whilst the first track, Breadfan, seemed pretty cool, the following 2 tracks didn't really do it for me. Seemed like some jolly, old dad rock. Guess I'll give it another go one of these days.

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Twisted_Psychology
Metal freak

Joined: Sat May 16, 2009 8:22 pm
Posts: 4121
Location: United States
PostPosted: Fri Sep 21, 2018 8:29 am 
 

Budgie's self-titled is where it's at for me. The groovy riff on Guts just pulled me in and Nude Disintegrating Parachutist Woman and Homicidal Suicidal really know how to keep the momentum going. Also if you told somebody that Budgie had a female singer, they'd probably believe you. Sure, Geddy Lee and such had higher pitched voices, but something about Burke Shelley's voice is distinctly feminine. It's pretty great.

I'd also like to be a fly on the wall for their lyrical process, if only because their oddball titles were probably one of the leading reasons why they never caught on beyond cult audiences.
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Conan Troutman
Metal newbie

Joined: Fri Oct 30, 2015 6:29 am
Posts: 116
Location: South Yorkshire, United Kingdom
PostPosted: Fri Sep 21, 2018 6:00 pm 
 

While I can't claim to be a Budgie fan, the problem they had is that Burke Shelley wore glasses and that just wasn't fashionable in any genre of music at that time. These days he'd be a hipster but back then no chance. Plus the vocals were an acquired taste.

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DoomMetalAlchemist
Metalhead

Joined: Mon Dec 27, 2010 6:10 am
Posts: 1612
PostPosted: Sat Sep 22, 2018 9:34 am 
 

Conan Troutman wrote:
While I can't claim to be a Budgie fan, the problem they had is that Burke Shelley wore glasses and that just wasn't fashionable in any genre of music at that time. These days he'd be a hipster but back then no chance. Plus the vocals were an acquired taste.


My guitar teacher from when I was a teenager totally looked like 70s Burke Shelley, due in part to the glasses.
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Abominatrix
Harbinger of Metal

Joined: Fri Oct 24, 2003 12:15 pm
Posts: 10989
Location: Canada
PostPosted: Sun Sep 23, 2018 11:41 am 
 

Never heard of anyone having a problem with Shelley and his glasses. That's such a weird thing to say.

I really like Budgie much of the time. Occasionally I get the feeling they're not really trying and there are one or two tracks on most of their albums I don't much care for. It's too bad, but they're still a great band. I love their sense of groove. They're funkier than you'd expect, especially for a bunch of Welshmen.

One thing I'm surprised by is that Led Zeppelin aren't mentioned more when talking about Budgie. For me, although they went down different paths eventually, the parallel is still clear. Hell, "hammer and Tongs" from In for the Kill is basically a "Dazed and Confused" ripoff, and both bands have a similar predelection for pretty acoustics mixed in with their weighty bluesy grooves. Shelley's vocal register is also close to Plant's, although they're hardly dead-ringers as Shelley sounds far less -- lecherous -- most of the time.
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_flow
Metal newbie

Joined: Tue Aug 15, 2017 6:31 pm
Posts: 230
PostPosted: Mon Sep 24, 2018 8:11 pm 
 

Thanks for the insight, they're mentioned in the KK Downing book obviously, and I'd never heard of the band.

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tomcat_ha
Minister of Boiling Water

Joined: Fri Oct 27, 2006 8:05 am
Posts: 4740
Location: Netherlands
PostPosted: Tue Sep 25, 2018 7:53 am 
 

great band ofc, dont have a clear favourite. I havent heard the one new record yet though.

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Abominatrix
Harbinger of Metal

Joined: Fri Oct 24, 2003 12:15 pm
Posts: 10989
Location: Canada
PostPosted: Tue Sep 25, 2018 3:10 pm 
 

I have to say, everyone always talks about the early hard 'n' heavy stuff up to and including Bandolier, and with good reason, but in more recent years the late 70s material has grown on me immensely. I'm specifically talking about If I Were Brittania I'd Waive the Rules (love that title) and, especially, Impeckable, which has risen in my estimation to become possibly my favourite Budgie record. Not sure why i didn't dig them so much at first. I've always loved funk and soul music and I don't know why I found Budgie taking on this influence a little hard to swallow initially, but they actually do it really well (better tahn Deep Purple for instance)! Yes, it's all funked up and I love it. What's more, there are lots of unexpected semi-progressive touches and an absolutely great energetic, swinging groove to many of the tunes. Amazing guitar/bass/drum interplay too and some of the sweetest guitar solos of the late 70s. If you go for the chronological experience, power Supply becomes something of a disappointment once the 80s come round, because they've lost almost all the fine touches they'd incorporated on the previous two records.
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Empyreal
The Final Frontier

Joined: Thu Nov 30, 2006 6:58 pm
Posts: 26362
Location: Where the dead rule the night
PostPosted: Tue Sep 25, 2018 4:24 pm 
 

Abominatrix wrote:
and, especially, Impeckable, which has risen in my estimation to become possibly my favourite Budgie record. Not sure why i didn't dig them so much at first. I've always loved funk and soul music and I don't know why I found Budgie taking on this influence a little hard to swallow initially, but they actually do it really well (better tahn Deep Purple for instance)!


This caught my eye since Deep Purple are pretty great at this to me. But checking out Budgie's Impeckable now and yeah, this is a total delight. Love this style. Should've checked out a long time ago, for sure.
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