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Black Veils. - 65%

Perplexed_Sjel, March 29th, 2008

**** MERGED REVIEW FOR SPLIT ****

____________________________________________________________________________
(Trist)

‘Black Veils’ is one of the latest pieces of material to come out from Trist, the Czech outfit. There are a whole host of demos, and such without haven’t been officially released by the band. The track on this split, ‘Mlhové Pole’ is a song taken from one of those unofficial demo's. I believe the demo was entitled, ‘Trnový Labyrint’. The song is practically the same as it was on the initial demo, but it’s longer. I’ve not listened to the unofficial demo in a while, so I can’t say what is different about the song. What I can deal with is what it sounds like in it’s current state, on this release. ‘Black Veils’ is seemingly one of the last pieces of material Trist will ever release. The band are apparently on hold for the foreseeable future, which is a mighty shame. So, we struggle through it and deal with what we were given before the band’s mysterious departure from the underground scene. ‘Black Veils’ is typical of Trist. It doesn’t feature a track that is much different from anything else the band has bothered to release. However formulated the band have become, I still love the material. This track is a good track, though not the best. The production isn’t as clear as some of the other full-lengths, but it’s an element which automatically sets it apart from the rest of Trist’s material. The production has a muddy feel to it, with the vocals and guitar work taking hold of much of the limelight. The bass is almost none existent, but it’s not that important anyway. The percussion is very simplistic, though it doesn’t need to be innovative because when dealing with Trist, one knows the work goes into what the guitars produce, as opposed to anything else. It sounds like a drum machine is used, to be honest. Very repetitive, simplistic beat. It’s not varied. It’s not overly significant. The guitars are where all the joy comes from. They create such splendid soundscapes, it has to be said. Trist are a band who explores the depressive side of black metal through atmosphere, not innovation. Musicianship has to be credited because despite the lack of features, it’s a good song. Worthy of anyone’s time.

The second half of the split deals with a new band, one I’d never even heard of before this split, Through The Pain. Their track, ‘Inner Oppression’ is similar only to Trist due to the fact that it serves up the same connotations the Trist track does. Despair, desolation and overriding melancholy. If you’re expecting anything we’ve not all heard before, you’ll be in for a disappointment. This song, ‘Inner Oppression’ isn’t ground breaking in the slightest. It, like the Trist sound, is simplistic. Typical rasping vocals which are indecipherable at the best of times. Repetitive guitars. Repetitive percussion. Bass is lost behind the wall of distortion. Through The Pain don’t offer much to write home about, in all honesty. From start to finish the song is almost exactly the same. No change. No variation. Just rasping vocals over a sea of repetition. Wave after wave of minimalist drums and riffs that don’t inspire. Quite disappointing. ____________________________________________________________________________
(Through the Pain)

‘Black Veils’ is one of the latest pieces of material to come out from Trist, the Czech outfit. There are a whole host of demos, and such without haven’t been officially released by the band. The track on this split, ‘Mlhové Pole’ is a song taken from one of those unofficial demo's. I believe the demo was entitled, ‘Trnový Labyrint’. The song is practically the same as it was on the initial demo, but it’s longer. I’ve not listened to the unofficial demo in a while, so I can’t say what is different about the song. What I can deal with is what it sounds like in it’s current state, on this release. ‘Black Veils’ is seemingly one of the last pieces of material Trist will ever release. The band are apparently on hold for the foreseeable future, which is a mighty shame. So, we struggle through it and deal with what we were given before the band’s mysterious departure from the underground scene. ‘Black Veils’ is typical of Trist. It doesn’t feature a track that is much different from anything else the band has bothered to release. However formulated the band have become, I still love the material. This track is a good track, though not the best. The production isn’t as clear as some of the other full-lengths, but it’s an element which automatically sets it apart from the rest of Trist’s material. The production has a muddy feel to it, with the vocals and guitar work taking hold of much of the limelight. The bass is almost none existent, but it’s not that important anyway. The percussion is very simplistic, though it doesn’t need to be innovative because when dealing with Trist, one knows the work goes into what the guitars produce, as opposed to anything else. It sounds like a drum machine is used, to be honest. Very repetitive, simplistic beat. It’s not varied. It’s not overly significant. The guitars are where all the joy comes from. They create such splendid soundscapes, it has to be said. Trist are a band who explores the depressive side of black metal through atmosphere, not innovation. Musicianship has to be credited because despite the lack of features, it’s a good song. Worthy of anyone’s time.

The second half of the split deals with a new band, one I’d never even heard of before this split, Through The Pain. Their track, ‘Inner Oppression’ is similar only to Trist due to the fact that it serves up the same connotations the Trist track does. Despair, desolation and overriding melancholy. If you’re expecting anything we’ve not all heard before, you’ll be in for a disappointment. This song, ‘Inner Oppression’ isn’t ground breaking in the slightest. It, like the Trist sound, is simplistic. Typical rasping vocals which are indecipherable at the best of times. Repetitive guitars. Repetitive percussion. Bass is lost behind the wall of distortion. Through The Pain don’t offer much to write home about, in all honesty. From start to finish the song is almost exactly the same. No change. No variation. Just rasping vocals over a sea of repetition. Wave after wave of minimalist drums and riffs that don’t inspire. Quite disappointing.