Register Forgot login?

© 2002-2014
Encyclopaedia Metallum

Best viewed
without Internet Explorer,
in 1280 x 960 resolution
or higher.

Thrash police: the overnight shift - 92%

autothrall, September 6th, 2012

The Legacy has never exactly been my favorite West Coast thrash opus of the 80s, but it's nonetheless a superb debut that warranted all of the respect and attention foisted upon it, and it remains one of Testament's finest offerings in their their 25+ years of existence. After changing their name from the less exciting 'Legacy', the Californians had just about everything going for them that any band could have wanted at the time. Distinct and memorable vocalist? Check. Potent and forceful selection of riffs? Check? Lead guitar god? Check. Even the band's name and logo were the sort you'd glance at once and never forget, so it's no wonder that the quintet was chosen as one of Atlantic Record's 'champions' in the metal arena of the 80s, alongside Savatage and Overkill, both of whom coincidentally released their career-spanning masterpieces in the same year this dropped...

...and while my feelings for this debut might not be so strong as for Taking Over or Hall of the Mountain King, there is no doubt that this thing has more heart than Mola Ram's pantry, and more fire than an oil drum in some Oakland ghetto back alley on a cool winter night. Testament's modus operandi was admittedly a wilder response to Metallica more than anything else, and there's not much use in denying the correlations of sound. The dense, chugging tone of the guitars, and their constant, forward-barreling charge riffs are highly redolent of Master of Puppets. Chuck Billy's vocals were like a feral James Hetfield if he had been raised by wolves and then later rescued by Native Americans and missionaries, who taught him English as part of his salvation. His howls are like beefed up approximations of James' screams on Kill 'Em All, and he cuts a far more imposing figure for such an insanely nice guy. There's also an epic, dramatic structure to this early Testament songwriting which recalls Puppets' high ideals and ambition. I wouldn't place this on quite the same pedestal of quality as its forebear (after all, that album is about the tops for me and this genre), and the mix of the guitars in particular can get a little muddy, but it certainly does daddy proud.

Where the two greatly diverge, however, is in the melodic structuring of guitars. Where Metallica's leads were borne off NWOBHM and hard rock/blues, Alex Skolnick had a heavy outside influences from jazz and classical music, and this translates heavily to both the solos and harmonies, despite both he and Hammett sharing the esteemed shredder Joe Satriani as a teacher. The result is this very ominous, spectral (and often surgical) feel to the tunes, well groomed to the concrete dynamics of Eric Peterson's strong palm muting rhythmic ability. Louie Clemente was a harder hitting drummer than Lars Ulrich, though his beats are regulated through the album and never indulge themselves beyond the necessary. Greg Christian is a firm, dextrous bassist, but he'd really shine later with Practice What You Preach, where you can hear his playing more clearly outside of the rhythm guitars. Here's he rifling along, smothered in the weight of the primordial, processed cellulose of the chugging. All told, though, Testament was loaded with weaponry from the start (even when they had Steve 'Zetro' of Exodus on vocals before Billy), and it really shows through in the compositional level of this debut.

There are about a half dozen tunes here standing out from the rest, but there isn't one among the nine that drags its feet behind in terms of sheer energy and momentum. "Alone in the Dark" is a particular favorite, for the melodic chorus vocals, ghostly melodies, and the percussive meter of the vocals in both the verses and the kickass breakdown. But then you've also got the equally ambitious "Apocalyptic City", with an excellent intro of clean guitars, leads and Christian's lines at long last muscling onto the listener's radar (this whole sequence is also a nice foreshadowing for various moments on The New Order). This is followed by a pair of the best, most melodic rhythm charges of their career, and the pre-chorus and chorus sequences are likewise brilliant as they erupt into ballistic speed. Truly an anthem worthy of a post-nuclear dystopia in which bands of rabid, ravenous mutants battle with motorcycles and spiked chains over the last surviving mate-flesh; and you can envision all of this in your mind while listening. Further notables includie "Burnt Offerings" with more of Alex's haunted, unforgettable leads, and some killer scale-driven verses; and "Raging Waters", which no swarthy thrashing sea-dog worth his salt should ever live without!

The other popular tracks, like "C.O.T.L.O.D. (Curse of the Legions of Death)", "Over the Wall" and "First Strike is Deadly" haven't resonated with me quite so much, but they're still a deadly arsenal of pent up, volatile riffing patterns that provide a lot of the album's mosh-worthiest moments, and in truth you could listen to the full 39 minutes of the album front to back to front again for 20 years and never get tired of it. My one real complaint about The Legacy is that the production seems a little dated, not nearly so pristine or immortal as Reign in Blood, Master of Puppets, or other A-listers of the scene. Both my cassette and CD versions have both suffered from the punchy, semi-muffled tone of the rhythm guitar, and in my own ignorance I've never looked up or tracked down a worthy remaster. Not necessarily a deal breaker, and it hardly can distract me from songs this well-written, but I always felt there was a level of polish missing from this album that would have amplified my appreciation, and to this day it slightly skews the album's value to the negative (though The Legacy's successors do a fine job of cleaning it up).

That aside, who in the disreputable fires of Hell wouldn't wanna own this thing? If not, you are one sloppy, unprepared cockroach who won't last long in the crud and cracks once Armageddon rains from the sky in a metallic nuclear symphony. It's a fantastic start to a largely consistent repertoire, and instantly established Testament (for good reason) as one of the go-to bands beyond the 'Big Four' of US thrash. The lyrics are steeped in horror, violence, even some political relevance as in the opener "Over the Wall". The Legacy is one of those records that, with ease, helped validate thrash metal as a viable artistic playground in which to forage and toil. It was sophisticated enough for guitar gurus, heavy enough for pitbreeds, dark enough to let the listener's imagination soar through its dark network of urban and subterranean corridors. Not the best of '87 by any means, but a survivor, through and through.

-autothrall
http://www.fromthedustreturned.com

The First Strike Is Always The Deadliest. - 90%

Metal_Jaw, February 21st, 2012

Testament is oft regarded as one of the best of the Bay Area thrash offerings, and one of the most underrated. They have a lengthy, solid, though admittedly inconsistent career, but keep a strong following of metalheads today. Much like their fellow California brethren, their first strike is the one most revered. Exodus has "Bonded By Blood", Metallica has "Kill 'Em All", Vio-Lence has "Eternal Nightmare", and Testament stands supreme with the untouchable "The Legacy".

Testament's technical thrash hits hard with their lineup here. The indomitable Chuck Billy provides the vocals, and holy mother of FUCK can this guy rock it! He takes the usual thrash style and makes it his own, letting loose with an array of killer growls, mean-as-hell screams and even some honest-to-fuck singing. The rest of the gang helps out with classic thrash gang vocals.Speaking of whom, how 'bout that Alex Skolnick, huh? Only 20 years old at the time and he was ripping that lead like a master! Highly technical and classically-influenced, he makes the thrash solo into brutal art. Assisting him is Eric Peterson on rhythm, who may not be quite as gifted, but the man is still a great player in his own right, unleashing great riffs and some cool intros to start things off. The only downplayer of course here is bass, played by Greg Christian, who, like many others, gets lost in this album's somewhat overly-quiet mix, but he helps keep time and rhythm all the same. Rounding it off is the great Louie Clemente on the kit. He's a highly technical artist in his own right. He wildly mixes typical double bass thrash hammering with more creative moments including awesome fills and mini-solos to help keep things sounding good and heavy.

The song have the privilege of being highly varied, always a welcome experience on any metal album. There's, of course, great aggressive numbers like the ferocious "Raging Waters" or "COTLOD" with Billy's mean vocals, fast drumming and memorable riffage, particularly on "Raging". "The Haunting" is a slightly slower but still wicked number with a catchy main riff and its memorable chorus. The more mid-paced but still heavy "Do Or Die" hits hard with some great gang vox amd another killer main riff, though the solo is a tad boring save for some neat riffage in the middle. "Alone In The Dark" reigns as the most commercial track on here, but still it's probably one the best with its hammering vocals, a good solo, and its unforgettable main riff, which gets mixed with a wonderful filler riff.

Overall, if you want to start with Testament, start with "The Legacy". You'll be ripped to shreds by the awesome vocal work, the incredible guitars, and vicious drumming. But be warned...FIRST STRIKE IS DEADLY!!!

A legacy born just a couple years too late. - 94%

hells_unicorn, September 7th, 2011

I’ve never cared a whole lot for the media created terminology used to label various waves of metal beyond perhaps as a casual point of reference in history. This is doubly so with regards to the various waves in the 80s thrash metal movement, where artificial tiers were put together by certain media outlets in order to qualify those who came first or sold the most as being the standard. Never was this line of categorization proven to be more misleading than with regard to Testament’s somewhat untimely, yet utterly astounding debut “The Legacy”. This is an album that, regardless of sales numbers, could stand toe to toe with anything put out by the so-called Big 4, and even some of the alleged 2nd tier, whom were on many occasions wrongfully upstaged by said bands.

What has been put together here is a fast, aggressive, dark, and downright nasty collection of songs that rival the intensity of Slayer, the polish of Megadeth, and the sleaze drenched mayhem of Overkill. This is a Testament album that is defined not by its lead guitarist, though Skolnick makes just as tantalizing a racket on here as he’s done since, but by an all out, collective mastery of the craft. This is an album where the rhythm riffs put forth by Eric Peterson (among the more underrated rhythm guitarists in the style) and the rest of the rhythm section play a pivotal role in shaping the character of the album. But perhaps even more auspicious than the whole of the instrumental arrangement is Chuck Billy’s wild vocal performance, upstaging both Hetfield and Araya in the nastiness department, and all but outright challenging Blitz Ellsworth in the higher end, gritty screamer’s club chairmanship.

It is often asked, why is this album regarded as a classic? The answer is, to put it bluntly, that this album came out in 1987 rather than 1985 (when half of it was written). Given the strong melodic underpinnings of many of the riffs and the general tendency towards older, NWOBHM infused speed metal, the character of this album is a bit old fashioned when considering where the scene was headed by this point. Some of this is taken into account within many of these songs as the riff set is up to snuff with the technical tendencies of post 1986 thrash, but when hearing the singing, catchy tendencies of much of “Over The Wall” (arguably the greatest speed/thrash song ever put out) and “Alone In The Dark”, it’s almost easy to mistake much of this album for a wannabe “Show No Mercy” emulation. In similar fashion, “Burnt Offerings” makes several riff paraphrases of “Four Horsemen”, to the point of sounding almost like a 2nd working of “Mechanix” in a slightly faster and more intense fashion than the famed song that ultimately came out of it on “Kill ‘Em All”.

However, at the same time that this band seemed to be looking backward to a few years prior, there is also some material on here that is actually looking ahead to thrash metal’s soon branch out into death metal. Perhaps the most obvious example is “The Haunting”, which while having a conventional thrash growl with a handful of banshee shrieks, has an overall atmospheric and dissonance to it that isn’t all that far removed from what Chuck Schuldiner was putting behind his guttural ravings on “Scream Bloody Gore” and “Leprosy”. “First Strike Is Deadly” also really brings home the Slayer influences, to the point of almost flirting with the intensity that was picked up on by Possessed and Morbid Angel, though the overall character of the guitar sound and vocals is still very firmly entrenched in the thrash paradigm.

Of all the albums ever put forth by Testament, this is the one that really demands not only continued consumer activity, but also recognition as a true classic that was the victim of a lack of attention by the recording industry in the earlier 80s alongside Overkill. This fully embodies the outward intensity, fury, and virtuosity that has been exemplified by other powerful Bay Area bands such as Vio-Lence and Dark Angel. This band gets a bum wrap as being a Metallica clone with some heavy Exodus influences, but the truth is that at their peak (ergo this album), this band was able to outclass the former at just about every turn except the originality department. It all depends on what is more important, being the first to do something, or doing it well in spite of what has happened before.

The last great Bay Area classic debut? - 100%

Seducerofsouls85, July 15th, 2011

For me Testament are one of those bands which peaked way too early. In my eyes they never ever topped their debut "The Legacy" and although they released many great subsequent releases, I do not think any of them match this. Sure Testament explored more creative pastures, they even crossed the hazy line between thrash metal and death metal in the later 90's. But their debut for me is their best, no matter how one dimensional people may accuse it of being. Now my reasoning for why I prefer this over any Testament release may seem juvenile, but upon closer inspection it would make perfect sense. "The legacy" when looking at it for all intents and purposes is an atypical thrash album, from the later 80's which is not innovating in terms of heaviness or originality. But why does it work? The simple reason it works is because whether you're completely new to Testament (like the listeners back in '87), or you've delved into their later recordings, realistically all you're expecting is an average attempt at thrash metal. But instead your breath is taken away, these guys are competent musicans and unlike later releases they don't go over the top. For me "The new order" and "Practice what you preach" are great thrash albums, but tend to disappear up their own ass. And anything post "Souls of black" can be great from an objective point of view, but thrash classic territory it surely aint. So this their debut is an onslaught of thrash, but delivered in a disciplined style akin to Metallica, now and again exploring the more raw and abrasive routes recently tread by Exodus. But most of all despite this album showcasing a new improved guitar god (Alex Skolnick), it never deviates into self-indulgent fret wankery which "The new order" is definitely guilty of, with its interludes and endless complex riffs and quirky musicianship. If you ask me no matter what era of Testament you listen to, you should always trace the roots to it's logical source "The legacy" no matter what imperfections this album holds.

This album has the weakest production in all of Testament's discography. But anyone who appreciates "Master of puppets" knows visceral guitar punch is not everything, and sometimes a track's stength can carry itself into the files of mandatory listening. And saying that Chuck Billy would achieve better vocals on the follow-up album, and Skolnick would take no prisoners on the next album. In fact the next album had a more mature overall feel, something which was amplified even further on some later releases. So having said all that, why does "The legacy" still cast a shadow over the output of Testament since? For me the simple reason is song writing...they stick to a simple thrash formula, rarely pulling surprises out the hat (well the only surprise is the competence of the guitar leads), but at the same time retaining an infectious feel to the tracks. I know every track on this album front to back, but from the next two albums I could probably only hum along to "Into the pit" or "Sins of omission". Being catchy isn't everything that is for sure, but the sound and feel this album has captured is truly awe inspiring. It has a perfectly balanced mix between epic first tier attempts, straight to the deprived rawness of many thrash outfits ferociously playing gigs hoping for recognition, lost in a world of beer and macho individualism. It's that perfect mix which pretty brings out the best in Bay Area thrash, something "Eternal nightmare" gets all the accolades for, but truth be told that album doesn't have nothing on this one. Testament proved that "Darkness descends" or "Reign in blood" was not the only way to make waves in the metal scene, merely a year after those two great releases. We have an album that was probably released too late for it's own good, and let's face it if it had been released in 1986 the easily influenced masses would probably be culling any other release of that year. And sometimes you get a sense the bands signing delayed the time of this release, as it almost seems like an album from 1985 landing in the uncertain world of 1987. Death metal had not quite been established (unless you are one of those who consider Possessed death metal), and other thrash heavy weights like Sodom were just starting to take things up a gear, so the timing was still quite reasonable but to me it does not actually sound like it belongs in 1987, which for the most part makes it ten times more promising than releases of the 87/88 period.

"Over the wall" despite it's raw guitar tone, and hermit like vocals is actually quite an anthemic track. The opening riffs are instantly recognisable, and the speedy grooves which follow the verse are near on devestating. The solo is simply lush though, the first taste of the great lead guitar work to follow. "The haunting" is less memorable but I still know it in it's entirey after over two decades of listening, and reading the lyrics almost put a smile on my face...

"Headless ghosts fill the halls
Shadow plays of grief and pain
Phantom speaks his final note
Tenants of the castle slain"

Yes those lyrics seem very oldschool indeed, but remember this outdates the likes of most established death metal so it was still widely accepted and not seen as obsolete for it's time. The nostalgic value of the lyrics is priceless, let alone the catchy riffs. There are more tracks of a worthy note even if you're not entirely impressed, such as "First strike is deadly" which has definitely gone down as a classic in most thrash circles. "Alone in the dark" carries on in the infectious manner of the opening track, throw in a few dazzling leads for good measure. "Apocalyptic city" has some quite interesting lyrical content, about an arsenist hell bent on vengeance, and the gentle but eery introduction to the track is misleading to the carnage that follows. Chuck Billy's vocals are raw, but had he been on top of his game this album would have lost it's raw velocity. This album holds enough surpises without too many tempo changes or breakdowns, an ode that surprising the listener does not depend on the tracks coming to a screeching halt. As for the drums? Well I'd be lying if I said I hadn't heard better, but they are fitting to the music despite lack of intensity. A lot has changed since the release of this album, to be fair a lot was changing during the release of this album. Death and Napalm Death had released tyrants in the genre, and the young metal heads of the time fled for their more extreme fix. But if I'm being completely honest thrash was still king, so it would kind of make sense that "The legacy" would still get respect despite the changing of the guards. But the even more amazing thing is that you can still appreciate this album, even with all that historic hindsight. "The legacy" is aptly named as it is Testament's true legacy, and if I'm being honsest I was a fool to hope they could ever match this one.

Holding the quest for banging, That beckons me! - 97%

Rust_In_Blood, February 27th, 2010

Constantly considered the most delayed debut inside the first wave of Bay Area Thrash, but equally a jewel as the other ones (especially Bonded by Blood & Show No Mercy). The main difference between Testament and the other guys is their extraordinary technique since the very early days: And The Legacy is the first proof of that. In each song there is an unmistakeable seal of virtuosism and intelligence, mixed with the permanent insanity and brutality in lyrics and music, which unfortunately never would be so intense in any later Testament record (but several of them are very enjoyable too).

This album demonstrates Skolnick as a worth disciple of Satriani, 'cause his work here is simply perfect, 10/10 (11/10 if I could). Every solo in this album deserves a place in the Hall of Fame. Skolnick's style has something more than speed and technique, Skolnick's style has an uncomparable feeling, a rarity within tharsh metal, and a big highlight of Testament's trade mark. He can play fast stuff like the insanely perfect solo in "Over the Wall" and make you drool, but also he can play slow stuff like the intro on "Alone in The Dark" without losing a bit of epicness and glory. Definitively a fucking magician, there's nothing we can do.

But if you think that Skolnick's the most versatile, wait for talking about Billy. This guy can be melodic or brutal, this guy can growl, grunt or scream, and this guy can do all perfectly. Look him performing "Burnt Offerings", "Alone in the Dark" or "Do or Die", Could it be catchier? I don't think so. Then look him spitting words in "C.O.T.L.O.D.", Could it be faster? I neither think so. And wait for hearing his screams on "The Haunting " and "First Strike is Deadly"... Simply insane. His wide range gives more and more brutality and versatility to this record. Lyrically we have dark themes (witchery, satan, darkness, rites, infernal battles...), that were taken in a very intelligent way. It runs very well for Testament, given the big contrast between it and the political lyrics on late 80's Thrash Metal. Is very remarkable the work in "Over the Wall" or "Burnt Offerings", 'cause you'll some philosophy hidden behind the wall of brutality. But if you want true thrash lyrics, look for "C.O.T.L.O.D." or "Apocalyptic City".

The riffage is hard to believe. They kidnap your soul and you can't escape till the song finishes. You'll find insanely catchy riffs like the crunchy intro of "The Haunting", "Over the Wall", "Alone in the Dark", and, as the biggest stand out, the main riff of "Burnt Offerings". Shit, is addictive, a vice maybe. You also have very intense (but, unfortunately, less memorable) things like "Do or Die", "Raining Waters" and the unstoppable "C.O.T.L.O.D.". Every song have any special touch that makes magic. Drumming is also good, is strong, intense and not too complicated, but never mediocre or offside.

The production could be a bit better. The bass turns sometimes hard of hear and the volume of the tracks is too low. You can realize it when you're listening other stuff and then you play songs from this album. The production's not sloppy or dirt and neither make the record less enjoyable, but is not perfect.

Either way, is a crime don't to take it as a classic, because it have several unique elements that you only can find in posterior bands obviously influenced by Testament. I think The Legacy could be taken more seriously, because is a true masterpiece of Thrash Metal, and is an obligatory record for anybody that wanna be called a Metalhead, and undoubtely their best, the first stike is the deadliest (For Testament).

See you in Hell guys!!
Keep Thrashin'

The Legacy - 98%

Noctir, May 15th, 2009

Testament formed in 1983, under the name Legacy. While some make the common mistake of assuming that this band arrived on the scene a little late, they were there when the whole Thrash Metal scene began to explode. One listen to their 1985 demo will be enough to prove that the band had already composed brilliant songs, yet it seemed to take them a bit longer to get signed and to record a full-length. In 1986, Chuck Billy replaced Steve Souza, on vocals, and the band changed their name to Testament. After spending a couple years, perfecting all of these songs, they finally recorded their debut album. The Legacy was released in July 1987.

I discovered this album back in high school. There was a shop that bought and sold used records, tapes, books, etc. and I found myself selling a lot of old tapes and movies to fund my music addiction. It was during the middle of summer vacation and I had a lot of time on my hands. I sold everything that I could possibly part with, only to spend every last dime (and then some) before I left the shop. While I was scanning through the cassettes, I ran across The Legacy and Live at Eindhoven. I was already, somewhat, familiar with Testament, but I had never heard this album. I tossed it in to one of the broken-down radios that they had out to preview things and it took me all of two seconds to realize that these tapes were coming home with me. Being quite fond of the old albums from Metallica, Megadeth and Slayer, this was exactly the kind of thing that I was looking for. This album is a timeless classic; one that I haven't grown tired of in all these years.

"Over the Wall" begins with an intense explosion of thrash riffs. This is very fast-paced and energetic. The vocal patterns that Souza created were perfected by Chuck Billy, who has a much more powerful delivery. A few wild screams lead into the middle section, which slows things down a bit. This is accompanied by an incredibly memorable lead solo by Alex Skolnik. This is something he really excels at and it is one of the most notable characteristics of Testament's old records. The drumming has a good, old school feel, though it's nothing technical or complicated. There is an epic aura about these melodies. All in all, this is a killer song to begin an album.

Dark and foreboding riffs introduce "The Haunting". This title is quite appropriate, as this possesses a feeling that is more in line with Slayer than Metallica (who Testament were often compared to). Once it gets going, the pace is fairly fast, though there are plenty of changes. The introductory riff returns and leads into a mid-paced thrash section. Another amazing solo appears, near the middle of the song. Skolnik's solos are much lengthier than those of Jeff Hanneman or Kerry King and they certainly bear more feeling, which adds depth to the songs. The vocals are impressive as well. I don't think Chuck Billy ever matched this performance.

A somber acoustic guitar is accompanied by a haunting solo to begin "Burnt Offerings". This one builds up, slowly, before raging forth from the darkness. The vocals go well with the main guitar harmony to create something of a dark atmosphere. The lyrics are far better here than they would be on later albums.

"The spirits of anger come up from the gallows
Conjured my demons appear
Summoned to my cast, prey this deadly mass
Taken by the fire you fail"

The more serious approach to the songwriting and execution, found on this album, suits the band's abilities far more than anything they'd attempt, later on.

"Raging Waters" starts out, almost like an extension of the previous song. It is drenched in the same atmosphere. It's a shame that Souza didn't remain associated with Testament to write all of the vocal lines, as his ideas, coupled with Billy's delivery and improvisation, work very well with this music. As with most of the songs on here, this one is aggressive and yet captures an epic feeling in the guitar melodies, accentuated by the solos.

Side A ends with "C.O.T.L.O.D." Naturally, this stands for 'Curse of the Legions of Death'. As the shortest song, it is no surprise that this is the most straight-forward track to be found. Of course, with a song this intense, the lyrics must be equally as aggressive.

"Attacking with force as we show no remorse
Obstructing our victims fate
The blood in the chalice saluting the fight
All virgins must die this night"

One might expect a song that only lasts for two and a half minutes to be filler, but this holds its own against the rest of the material on The Legacy.

Side B opens with "First Strike Is Deadly". It starts out with a strange intro that leads into more killer thrash riffs. Clemente's double-bass work is done pretty well, especially considering that he was never given much credit as a drummer. Some of Chuck Billy's screams are insane, as he really displays a lot of power and versatility on this record. This song features the kind of sweeping arpeggios that Testament is well known for, as well as one of the best lead solos on the album.

"Do or Die" arrives at a point where one would surely expect filler. Quite the contrary, this song bring yet more elements to the table. The riffs are quite unique, among those that populate this album. The vocal lines are brilliant as well, being very memorable and matching the music, perfectly. This particular song seems to utilize more Speed Metal riffs, as opposed to pure Thrash.

The epic feeling that flows throughout this classic album is present from the opening solo of "Alone in the Dark". After this brief intro, a haunting guitar harmony plays over a vicious thrash riff. This repeats during the chorus. The story told in the lyrics is far more interesting than most anything they came up with in later years.

"Faustus prepares the legions of the night
Diviners from the far north arrive
Aimlessly people there huddled in a pack
Wreaking deadly havoc on mankind"

Late in the song, the pace slows down for another solo, before returning to the main riff. As with all of the songs, the placement of this one is just right.

This masterpiece concludes with "Apocalyptic City". A somber acoustic melody is joined by a depressive lead solo and bass line to introduce this epic song. As things get going, there is a sense of tension in the riffs; somehow, it is easy to detect that the end is near. The riffs are bloody impressive and the solo is as epic as it gets. There are some nice lead harmonies as well, before the main riff returns. Of course, the tale of mass murder, by incineration, is quite interesting as well. As the final notes fade out, you can't help but feel that you have exprienced something very significant.

Simply put, The Legacy is an essential classic of Thrash Metal. The songwriting is vastly superior to Reign In Blood, though it doesn't quite compare to the early Slayer records. Still, this destroys anything ever released by Anthrax and nearly rivals albums such as Ride the Lightning and Peace Sells... While it is nowhere near as violent as Darkness Descends, it features a sense of melody and an epic atmosphere that Dark Angel would never be able to achieve while standing tall over Pleasures of the Flesh or Beyond the Gates. Unfortunately, Testament would never match this masterpiece of Bay Area Thrash Metal. At any rate, any fan of this style is absolutely required to pick this up.

The Best Testament Album - 85%

Thrasher53, March 1st, 2008

Now Testament are far from a all time great thrash band, thats for sure. They had good songwriting ability, but lacked enough good thrash riffs to save their lives. They had a mega-talented guitarist in Alex Skolnick, and a weak supporting cast besides maybe the drummer and bassist. Now they had some of the tools to make a great thrash band, but at best are a above average thrash band. They really didn't introduce any ideas that hadn't been tried before with this release, and its got alot of Master of Puppets structure worship with lots of repeated riffs.

Now onto the songs as usual."Over The Wall" has a nice main riff, and is interesting enough to have me sold. What the band fails to do here is follow it up with other great riffs, but the original concept is more than good enough to call this a highlight. "The Haunting" has alot of good riffage and even a solid tempo shift, and has brilliant catchy song writing. "Burnt Offerings" contains simply some of the best ever riffs in thrash history, so its ok that this song doesn't deliver in bulk. This song is the best song Testament has done besides "Reign of Terror". "Raging Waters" bores me half to death admittedly. Nothing new tried here at all. "C.O.T.L.D." is their hardest attack on the senses, but that only really works if your new to thrash.

"First Strike Is Deadly" has an absolutely brilliant solo, but besides that used the same generic Testariff's that we see in later albums amplified. "Do Or Die" is a catchy midpaced number, the pace is the only thing that makes it stand out from the rest. "Alone In The Dark" is good, well written, but lacks meaty riffs. Once again Skolnick delivers an amazing solo, but its obvious that the solo has been made longer to make up for the song writing. "Apocalyptic City" has nice lyrics, but lacks the playing to back it off like so many songs on the album.

Overall the album's production leaves a lot to be desired, with way too much emphasis put on the rhythm guitar and a semi-muddy guitar sound. The albums lack of riffs is made up for by truly innovative riffs, and creative songwriting. However, its painfully obvious that the band was running out of good ideas as soon as the second half of the album began.

All in all its good, especially for a Testament album. Some highlights include "Over The Wall", "The Haunting", "Burnt Offerings" and the solo in "First Strike Is Deadly". Despite this most of the material is painfully average, especially compared to other albums released in '87. Despite this, the album suceeds in enough ways for me to call it above average or even good.

Overall: Buy this album if your a Testament fan, or if you want mid-quality (occasionally high) thrash metal. Otherwise, just download the highlight songs and be done with it.

Outlook: Above Average-Good

Testament's best - 96%

CHRISTI_NS_ANITY8, October 10th, 2007

Testament are considered one of the best thrash metal band of the second period in that genre, more exactly the period from 1985 to 1990. These bands, along with Forbidden and Vio-lence, were formed in the second half of the 80s and released their first albums in that period. The Testament (ex-Legacy) debut is called exactly “The Legacy” in honour of the former band and it can be considered as their true masterpiece.

Testament belong to those thrash metal bands that give a big importance to melody in their songs, like Metallica, for example, or Anthrax. And exactly from the band of James Hetfield that Testament take the songs structure and most of the melody. The Skolnick’s guitar solos are fucking great, with slides, tapping are shreds, so inspired to Hammet’s one; a good example is the solo in the great “Raging Waters” that shows also the power of Chuck’s vocals, so bad ass and violent, sometimes in the borderline between thrash and death.

The incipit is one of those who made history with the devastating “Over The Wall” song. A classic that contains one of the most beautiful solo I’ve ever heard in thrash metal . The violence is always well balanced with the essential importance of melody. Tracks like “C.O.T.L.O.D.” or “First Strike Is Deadly” shows a compact and brutal rhythmic session, extremely good screamed vocals and sometimes very melodic lead guitars lines. Sometimes the production, the distortion of the rhythmic guitars, along with the drums reminds me Metallica from 1986 to 1988.

“Burnt Offerings” has a melodic beginning with a solo that seems a violin for the sound and the technical level, always very high. Even in the rhythmic parts the guitars continue to play quite complicated riffs, perfect cut for the powerful Chuck’s vocals. The only song I dislike is “The Haunting”: quite common, without epic moments compared to the level of the other ones. When Chuck’s vocals become clearer and less raw, in my opinion they loose power because they are not so good, like in “Alone In The Dark” song, “saved” by the great music and solos.

The violent and obscure “Apocalyptic City” ends this great album, still very influenced by the past first thrash metal scene but always quite original. Another thing I disliked a bit is the drums , a bit too monotonous in the way of playing…Clemente is not Hoglan at all!! Anyway a debut that made history in this music and surely deserves to be in every metal freaks collection.

Their Best - 99%

morbert, August 28th, 2007

This is one of those albums everyone knows to be a classic. When something is considered a classic (this album has been that for 20 years now), newcomers tend to listen to it in a prejudiced way, purposely looking for negative aspects. I myself, I grew up with it, so I know why this is a classic.

‘The Legacy’ is Testaments best album. All their strong points are on this single album. Chuck Billy is at his best here. He never ever again achieved sounding as good as he did on this album. Aggressive with incidental high pitched screams. His youthful enthusiasm is dominant. You can hear this young boy trying to conquer the world. Maybe Chuck never sounded this good again since most of the lyrics and vocal lines on these songs were actually written by Steve Zetro Souza? Who knows (and who cares) since this sure as hell is Chuck’s best performance ever.

Skolnick’s solo’s are melodic as always and on the Legacy they are catchy and heavy as well. Some of his best material is here. Just try ‘Apocalyptic City’ and ‘Over The Wall’ for instance. Riff monster Peterson just blazes through the album with his best riffs and dirtiest sound ever. Louie Clemente has never been thrash metals best drummer but because of the dense production and his overenthusiastic playing it simply convinces. Too bad Greg Christian isn’t as audible as he would be on later albums. I love his metallic Ibanez sound ripping through the walls of guitars.

‘First Strike is Deadly’ is a superb song. Everyone shall agree. Can you imagine it being the worst song on an album? Well, on The Legacy it is. All the other songs simply blow it away! And that is saying enough I presume. This album remains one of the best thrash metal albums of 1987 and stands firmly as the ultimate Testament album to this day. Worship this or die!

Why This Isn't Considered a Classic is Beyond Me - 99%

DawnoftheShred, April 11th, 2007

I can remember the very first time I listened to The Legacy. It was on a pair of shitty headphones in a used music store and at the time, it was one of the most intense and technical thrashers I'd ever heard, quickly becoming a personal favorite. Though I've since discovered faster and heavier things, I've always seen this as a prime example of a thrash debut done perfectly right. Imagine my surprise to find that the album that had so often kicked my ass was somewhat panned here on the Metal Archives. Had my youth blinded me from seeing it as it really was? These negative reviews prompted a relisten, which I'm quite pleased to admit that it only reinforced my opinion on this album's greatness.

I really can't understand why more people don't like this. The Legacy is a solid display of pretty much all the aspects you could want in an '87 thrasher. First off, Chuck Billy rules. Though the band kicked ass as Legacy with Zetro as frontman, Billy has far more presence. This album was released a few years before he started pulling James Hetfield impressions, and he still maintained the ability to let off a stellar shriek every now and again. No complaints there. So what about the rhythm section? Eric Peterson and Alex Skolnick are fucking riffmasters. Most of this is full-force thrash insanity, with the frantic pace kept by the proficient Louie Clemente, but it's in the mid-paced and half-time riffs that these guys really show their stuff. There are some absolutely brutal crushing riffs in the bridge sections of "Do or Die" and "First Strike is Deadly" as well as throughout the album and there's dozens of killer harmonized riffs, such as the opening to "The Haunting" and the fucking amazing verse riff of "Burnt Offerings." These riffs flow perfectly with the soaring vocals of Chuck Billy to create a uniquely occultic atmosphere that you'd be hard pressed to find on another thrash album. This is only strengthened by the album's lyrics, which cover a variety of topics from said paganist ritualism to prison breaking and arson. I admit that Greg Christian's bass work doesn't play as much of a role on here as it will on future albums, but it's nice nonetheless.

The absolute highlight of the album, however, is the lead work of Alex Skolnick. Technically impressive beyond his years, his solos are far more melodic than the brunt of thrash players at the time (your Kerry King imitators, for instance) and undeniably skillful. Listen to that epic lead buildup in "Over the Wall," the harmony section from "First Strike is Deadly," the absolute insane sweeping passage from "Apocalyptic City," hell, listen to them all! Every solo on here is masterfully crafted and the only thrash guitarists even comparable to Skolnick here are Jeff Waters (of Annihilator notoriety) and perhaps Lee Altus. Dimebag Darrell could be considered, though at the time (1987), Pantera weren't exactly a thrash metal band.

So surely there must be something amiss here that has caused The Legacy to achieve the criticism it gets, and I think I've figured it out. Some of the songs on here are a bit longer, lyrically, then thrash songs of this period traditionally are, excepting Dark Angel of course. But rather than progress the song and create new verse riffs as the lyrics unfold (see pre-Reign in Blood Slayer), Testament chose to simply repeat the established verse riffs a few more times to match the length of the lyrics. This never really appeared as a problem to me, as the songs aren't long enough to end up sounding repetitive, but I can see how this might bore some people, especially those used to faster, more diverse albums. Take "Alone in the Dark," a catchy mid-paced thrasher that has something like three or four verses, all using that same verse riff. But again, I've never seen it as a problem, so why should I subtract points from my score because of it?

Thrash fans, I implore you: give this a chance. If not for the great lyrics, the classic riffs, or the vocal performance of Chuck Billy, at least check it out for the killer soloing.

Highlights: Every damn one

Ripper of a good thrash album - 92%

natrix, March 18th, 2007

A lot of folks on here sure don't like Testament, but for me, they've always been one of my favourites. Sure, as time has gone by, I have found other thrash bands of the same era that are heavier and more interesting, but I'll always hold a very special place in my heart for the first two Testament albums, especially The Legacy.

Musically, Testament brings a high level of technicality to the table, while retaining a higher level of heaviness. They surely fit in alongside Slayer, Metallica, and Overkill, and certain elements of thier style all remind me of the aforementioned bands. On The Legacy, the technicality is toned down a bit, leaving some especially wicked riffs on songs such as "C.O.T.L.O.D." and "Raging Waters," but when things get technical, it's usually in the form on magnificent lead passages. My favourites being the lead breaks on "First Strike Is Deadly" and "Over the Wall."

"Burnt Offerings" and "Alone in the Dark" are propbably the best two songs on here. Both feature heavy riffs, pretty jeuvinille lyrics, and just the right amount of evil sounding melodies to make the songs feel a bit frightening. Not quite as much as Mercyful Fate, but there is certainly a stylistic similarity there.

Chuck Billy deserves major props for his vocal performance on here. He's always had a very strong vocal delivery, and on here all aspects are fully utilized. Just listen to the wide range of vocals he uses on "C.O.T.L.O.D." where he goes from a nasty snarl to insane screaming and deep growls. As far as I know, no one in thrash was using vocals this extreme at the time. His screaming sounds especially raw and evil, while his deeper growls sound a bit demonic.

I don't know who the hell fucked up the mastering on this thing, but if I were Testament, I would have them shot dead in the street. The problem is that no matter what, you can never get the thing to sound loud enough on your stereo, and the riffs are very, very clean sounding. In my opinion, that has always been the cheif problem with Testament; they have a very clean sound, sort of compressed.. On here, at least the vocals are over the top, with a great emphasis on a good variety of heavy riffs.

Solid speed/thrash - 82%

Mungo, March 16th, 2007

Testament were never really all that good. Sure, Skolnick could pull out some great soloing and they have a few songs that completely own the living fuck out of you, but for the most part they were a 2nd rate thrash band that eventually changed their sound to Groove Metal with a new guitarist. Their debut album 'The Legacy' is their best effort, having the best riffs of their career and some truly awesome soloing.

Yet it still doesn't feel like a great album. It feels as if it is trying to break through to greatness at times but it never really does, feeling content to stay on second gear and only occasionally going up to 11. The main culprit of this problem is that a lot of the riffs are similar to each other and hence a lot of the songs seem to blur together with only a few highlights along the way. I can distinguish songs such as 'Over the Wall', 'Raging Waters' and 'Alone in the Dark', but play me any other songs and I can't pinpoint what exactly the name of the them are. This blurring problem is most evident during the first half of the album, in which there are a few songs in a row that sound remarkably similar to each other, only sounding a little different by some different melodies here and there. What amplifies this problem is the poor production. Usually I don't mind badly done or raw productions, but on here it affects the songs. The guitar tone doesn't have much weight to it and seems to be sort of 'fluffy', and when you consider the fact that the riffs sound the same on a lot of occasions this is even worse.

When you strip away these complaints however, this is still essentially an above average speed/thrash album, albeit a repetitive one. The guitar solos are the greatest thing seen on here, with Skolnick being able to pull off some great melodic leads. And while a lot of the riffs do sound similar to each other, this album still gets the head banging throughout, only pausing every now and then for a melodic intro. The pace is kept very fast throughout, and whilst occasionally sounding a bit too overfast adds to the good points of the album, as well as the brutality factor which despite not being too present is still there in a number of songs. The riffing is competent for the time it was released, and there are a number of really good riffs here and there. Chuck Billy's vocals are great, and sound aggressive yet melodic and every now and then he'll unleash a great scream.

As for highlights, the first that comes to mind would be the opener 'Over the Wall' with it's great main riff and the excellent solo that comes after it. 'Raging Waters' has some catchy vocal lines as well as a nicely done melodic riff while 'Alone in the Dark' starts off with an amazing intro solo after which it speeds up into a great midpaced riff combined with a great vocal performance.

While having a few major things wrong with it that drag it down, 'The Legacy' is still a pretty good album and Testament's best before they slowly deteriorated in quality. Anyone who likes good speed/thrash should definitely check this out.

An instant classic - 96%

Chopped_in_Half, August 4th, 2006

So I was watching Headbangers Ball when I was about 17, back when it was decent, and they showed the video for "Over The Wall", and I wanted the album so bad I could taste it, so I finally got it like 2 days later, and fell in love with it right off, so yeah, First Strike is Deadly, you've been warned.

The production on this album is a bit muddy, the drums aren't very loud, but hey, the production fits, and it kicks ass, makes it all the more raw.

The journey opens with "Over The Wall" Instant classic here, this song is a fucking riff fest, this song is about a prison break that really happened, so the lyrical content is fucking awesome, Chuck sounds brutal as hell on this track too, with those high pitched screams, kick ass, "The Haunting" Opens with a weird, creepy sound effect, then the catchy lead from Skolnick comes in, and eventually the song will kick in to high gear, and just totally rip your face off, especially the chorus "For a haunting we will...GO!!!", add an INSANE solo to that, and you've got another great song, which is what this is, "Burnt Offerings" Is alright, I think it's overrated though, theres much better songs on here, does have some nice leads however.

Now "Raging Waters" On the other hand, is fucking crazy, this song kicks right off, with a catchy as hell verse, with a wicked good riff underneath it, then you will hit a part where chuck says "THE DEVIL'S TRIANGLE!!" I love that part, then yet another very kick ass solo, "C.O.T.L.O.D." Just rips you apart, with it's fast as fuck riffs, aggressive vocals, and killer speed, love the chorus too "CURSE OF THE LEGIONS OF DEAAAAATTTTTHHHHH!!" and then the imfamous laugh by Chuck, "First Strike is Deadly" Starts with a spoken intro, not sure what it says though, but I do know this song kicks major ass, with it's sinister twisted backwards riff, not headbanging is not an option, set the neck on auto-pilot for this, and air guitar the solo, yeah, this song rules.

"Do or Die" Is another favorite of mine off here, starts out right off kicking your ass with a nice speedy riff, the chorus to this song is wicked catchy and cool, you can't help but not singalong, some nice groove riffs as well, "Alone in the Dark" This is quite a bit different, it's slow, very nice riffs though, and Chuck actually uses clean vocals on this, and he sounds good too, another shredding solo is found here too, not the best song on the album, but certainly good, don't skip it, "Apocalyptic City" Opens with a very nice melodic acoustic intro, eventually the electric guitar comes on, with some nice leads, and then the monster riff comes on, you've been ordered by Testament to headbang, another riff fest on this song, lots to be found, lots of tempo changes, this song has it all, definatly the kind of song you want to close a great album.

This is a fucking killer debut, and is legendary, you don't want to miss out on this amazing piece of Thrash, you have to hear it for yourself, sometimes words can't really explain it all, and they can't here, plus I didn't want to make a long ass review, but check this album out, THRASH!!

Once you're in, you won't come out! - 93%

cyclone, December 27th, 2004

I was never really into other Testament records, and I can sort of understand, why others also don't like them, but I've always liked The Legacy and I really don't know, what makes it so mediocre as many others say. Well, off to the review.

The musicianship here ranges from excellent to good. I think that we all know, that Alex Skolnick is the master of lead guitar. I'm not sure if riffs are his or Eric's, but the lead work and the solos are really remarkable. Skolnicks' playing is emotional and influenced by classic music, which we're not used to hear in thrash, but don't worry, he can't still tear the place apart with some fast stuff. He even manages to squeeze a little Arabic melody into the album (see Burnt Offerings). The riffs are cool, but maybe a bit unrecognizable. They still work great on this album, though, but the lack of memorability really showed as Testament's worst side on their later albums.

Chuck Billy's voice is interesting. He can sing almost everything, as you maybe have heard on some of his later work (he even growled on some records). Fortunately, there aren't any growls on here, just straight up thrash singing. Chuck's voice is strong and quite deep, the most extreme vocal line is probably in the chorus of First Strike Is Deadly. The vocal lines themselves are quite catchy and melodic, I especially like the one on Do Or Die.
Drums are well played, the fills and the rhythm changes are definitely out there and are well timed. Bass isn't that audible, due to not that good of a production, but that doesn't really bother me.

The songs are about 4 or 5 minutes long, except for C.O.T.L.O.D. which clocks at about 2:30. The album is quite consistent and well balanced, which means that there aren't any bad songs here. All tracks are worth mentioning. Over The Well isn't that memorable but it IS fast and heavy as hell. On the contrary, The Haunting has a really memorable chorus. I also like the main riff and the fast verse part where Chuck spits out the lyrics at a impressive speed.
Burnt Offerings starts off a bit softer but then turns into a nice thrasher. It has one of the best and most memorable leads ever written. The chorus is also good. This song is a kickass!
Raging Waters could also be called ''Raging Thrasher'' since it definitely is one. So is C.O.T.L.O.D. which is the shortest but probably also the most furious song on the LP. Good!
First Strike Is Deadly is brutal as fuck. Well, the chorus probably sounds a bit better on the First Strike Still Deadly recording but this is still really good. FIRST STRIKE IS DEADLY! Chuck makes some great screams on this one.
Do Or Die is a bit slower. As said before, the vocal line on here is a killer. So damn accessible, melodic and catchy. Also some nice guitar work from Skolnick!
Alone In The Dark is the softest song on the record and also the most accessible one. Well, it's still good.
The solo on Apocalyptic City is great.

The Legacy is a good record and it's definitely worth buying. Even if you dislike other Testament records, try this, you won't be dissapointed.

First Strike Is Deadly - 85%

Bloodstone, April 4th, 2004

If you'd look up "bay area thrash" in a music encyclopedia, it’s likely that you would find this album as the headline. This is about thrash as it gets; lots of aggression, really heavy riffs, angry vocals, fast tempos and whatnot.

Having a comparable style to early Metallica (mainly the two first efforts) and a few other bay-area groups, Testament weren't uncommonly labelled as unoriginal or "rip-offs", but also, having some great musicianship on board and a recognizable and very thrashy sound, they quickly gained respect from all around and eventually became the 5th biggest selling thrash unit of all time. The band had built up a fairly strong fan base during the four years between the year they formed and the year they released this debut album, so this one sold pretty good as well.

What about that "great musicianship" that I mentioned? Well, Alex Skolnick is obviously the best example, because his lead style is vastly different from for example Kerry King's or Kirk Hammett's, making Testament stand out from the rest of the bay area scene where guitar leads are mostly about lightning-fast shredding or "drilling". Skolnick's style is much more melodic and emotional, but he still plays fast when it's called for, so he does fit into the band's otherwise pretty thrashy sound.
Eric Peterson is a pretty darn excellent rhythm player; while he may be a little hard to hear on this album, he is in no way to be overlooked. A thrashy and heavy rhythm style, which is more notable on later releases, though.
Chuck Billy has to be one of the most menacing thrash vocalists I've ever heard; aggressive and dangerous, but still with a knack for melody, especially on later releases (the majority of the material on this album was written with the far less melodic, but still very good vocalist Steve "Zetro" Souza, who quit to join Exodus).

The album opener is my fave on the disc - 'Over the Wall'!!! No long acoustic intro or sampled effect here; this song jumps straight to the point from the first second, but REALLY explodes in your face at 0.15 - pit material right here, no doubt. Check out those excellent tempo shiftings, between the fast tempo and "Restart my life or self destruction...To climb this wall of dark construction!!" The slow down at 1.56 is typical Testament with it's melodic lead melodies and bass work, but really standing out here is the solo which is truly Alex Skolnick at his absolute best. The lyrical theme of the song is jailbreak and it actually slays both Thin Lizzy's and AC/DC's respective 'Jailbreak' songs, no matter how excellent those songs may be!

'The Haunting' has a kind of strange and slightly repetitive main riff, but follows suit as far as thrash goes. Good chorus, and the solo manages to stand out as well.

'Burnt Offerings' is probably the most "grand" and "epic" on the disc, as it begins with acoustics and lead melodies before exploding into the heavy chorus riff followed by a truly blistering Arabic-like lead melody in the verse! The middle section is thrashy as well and overall this song is one of the best and most well-written on the album.

One of the weaker tracks comes next, 'Raging Waters', which in no way lets down in thrash, but nevertheless lacks in quality. It's mostly about fast chugging and pit-moshing, without any particular memorability to make for the occasional lack of substance that flaw a few of the tracks here. Some sections of this song display a bit more melody than the rest of the songs, but they're all kinda forgettable and generally nothing special, really.

While the 2.28 long track 'C.O.T.L.O.D.' may not have any more substance than the previous, the furious and mangle-your-face main riff along with the absolutely anthemic chorus most definitely make up for it. This song was made for the pits, meaning that with this song, Testament wants you to get hurt. Really. The overall brutally and the somewhat short length of the song could make one think of 'Reign in Blood', but while this song is along the same lines in speed and aggression, there is a bigger difference in melody; C.O.T.L.O.D. is very brutal song, but still with a melodic main riff, which most songs in the middle of 'Reign in Blood' aren't really built around (and that's still staying objective, but I'm not a big fan of that record).
Quickly jumping on to my second favorite on the disc, 'First Strike Is Deadly' easily matches the intensity of the previous song, but is even better! Also, if the riffs at 0.21 and 0.37 don't make your head bang hard instantly, then go see your local doctor; it may be a hearing problem or a neck injury (which would make sense, seeing which track that comes before this one!). Both the verse and the chorus absolutely blast; check out the insane Chuck vocals in both! The slow down section at 1.43 isn't half bad - especially when the "DEADLY STRIKE!! Bred to kill!" line kicks in. Yet another great Skolnick solo follows during the slower section, before blasting back into the madness again!

'Do or Die' (Aces High, anyone? "Do or diiiiiieeeee" "Won't you ruuuuuuuun") is unfortunately one of the less memorable tracks on here. A similar problem to 'Raging Waters'; lots of thrash but lacking memorability. It does have a little more substance and some really good sections, but parts like the monotonous chorus just tend to pass by without me taking any particular notice. However, definitely check out the nasty section at 2.56, when that riff really gets kicked off by the drums. Mmm, thraaaaashy.

The chunky 'Alone in the Dark' is probably the most accessible song on here; nowhere as thrashy as the rest, but still memorable and featuring a catchy main riff. The heavy chorus display some deep and growling Chuck vocals while the pre-chorus displays the more melodic side of Testament (which is much more evident on later releases), appealing a little more to the average metal fan, perhaps. Also, the lead work in this song is once again spectacular; check out the intro and middle leads, with Eric backing it up with a great steady rhythm!

'Apocalyptic City' has a good intro before it begins to thrash like mad, though the main riff may be a little lacking in cohesiveness... but maybe it's just my taste. Anyway, especially great Chuck vocals and Alex leads are evident; this is standard thrashy Testament fare. This song features another great solo worth pointing out, especially listen for it at 3.27!

So, apart from a few filler songs here and there, is there anything that brings down this album in general? Unfortunately, there is, and it's the damn production!!
The high-hat is waaaayyyy too dominant, making the ALREADY muddy guitars drown in it. I've heard a good deal of badly produced thrash metal in my life, but this album probably takes it as far as full-length releases go; it's not hard to see why the band chose to re-record some older tunes in 2001 because Atlantic didn't give the band the right to remix the older records.
Other flaws? Well, this album is NOT for everybody, be so sure, because this is, even disregarding the production, some pretty damn raw and chaotic thrash. For some average metal fans, many songs may end up sounding too similar to each other (even if this album features more variety than many other thrash records), but if you see yourself as a fan of thrash generally, then you already own this album (RIGHT?!). But this is still, in one sentence, a highly recommended thrash album to any fan of the genre.

Leaders!!!!!...not followers - 85%

skolnick, February 10th, 2003

Legacy was history…Testament was now there to rule on earth…Probably one of the first questions you’ll ask yourself when you had listen to this is gonna be: Haven’t I fuckin’ heard this before? OK…Testament, although having recorded their debut very late are not some riff ripping off followers but some of the walking thrash creating gods of this earth. True…many may thought that Testament just copied and intensified the old good and reliable formula to produce some decent thrash and make some heads bang furiously…So, it looks to me that you are forgetting (if you ever knew) that Legacy was formed in 1983…YES, that’s right my friend metalheads, the year of the thrash explosion (“Kill ‘Em All” and ”Show no Mercy”)! Testament, at that time under the moniker of Legacy, started to walk into the same direction of the big 80’s thrashers following along their steps, but actually even managing to go beyond them, being a much more aggressive metal attack.
Sometimes I just can’t believe that some bands that started some time after Legacy, and I think you’ll know the years when those ones started, are considered far more original and creative. Well, just this kind of comparison looks pathetic to me. Why? Because first of all, what we can do is put Testament at the same level or even higher than those bands, and second place, have you ever heard another Thrash band with such a really brutal and heavy debut album? Testament really made a difference in what they wanted to proof… That… although spending some years without a recording contract, they managed to stay apart from the trends and listen to what was being done in their musical area, pushing themselves beyond the limits and getting themselves really much more heavier and technical…We cannot call this band a bunch of “old ideas” repeaters…I would prefer call them Leaders, not Followers…

Ok, more deep into the music now… Legacy had officially died as the name for the band, from the moment that Billy Milano (yeah, that fat freak from S.O.D and M.O.D) came up with the perfect name for them…”The Legacy”, Testament’s first album ended up to be a gigantic monument to honour what the band had made in their past years before the recording of this record and to thrash metal in general…

It starts with “Over the Wall”, and it’s for me the one of the best openers on a metal album I’ve ever heard…that intro is just pure fucking head banging. Alex Skolnick and Eric Peterson really had hit very hard on those guitars in this one and Louie’s drum pounding fits just perfectly… if you don’t feel dizzy after hearing this one, than you are not a real thrash fan.

“The Haunting” is another Thrash monster, especially because of those intro riffs that are just absolute “evil” and those fantastic solos… Great Thrashing and head banging experience, an essential listening…

“Burnt Offerings” is an Arabic/Metal melodical fusion masterpiece. This one is literally played at every Testament show. Starts with a calm solo backed up with a cool fingerpicking melody, being followed by those furious Arabic metal riffs, ending up in some really fast parts with a really impressive solo that I think it was actually played by Eric Peterson…Brutal!!!

“Raging Waters” is a single written song by Eric Peterson, and it’s quite good, especially in the middle of it when the song really picks the pace with that great riffage. Also a good thrashing experience…

The peak of brutality on this record comes with “C.O.T.L.O.D”. You can definitively hear that this one has Derrick Ramirez’s personal touch in it. Absolute thrash, one of the best on this album…Alex Skolnick and Eric Peterson just didn’t felt satisfied until they teared the studio apart by playing those amps so loud on this one…Amazing!!!

“First Strike is Deadly” shows perfectly the power of early Testament…and Louie Clemente’s potential too. This is the only song where I heard Clemente striking the double bass, and he’s proved that he is good, at the same level of Dave Lombardo in Slayer’s “Angel of Death”. Alex’s solo on this one is superb…this is pure thrash frenzy…fantastic!!

“Do or Die” and “Alone in the Dark” are also very good but stay a little bit behind the others in there. The first one manages to get some interesting riffs in the middle of it while the second looks more like a heavy metal act than a thrash act…still, don’t get me wrong…they are also pretty enjoyable…

To finish it up comes the fantastic “Apocalyptic City”. Great intro, great song, great solo…everything is really great about this one…the perfect closer for this thrash “work of art”…

Steve “Zetro” Souza’ s departure ended up to be beneficial for the band…Chuck Billy really had a much stronger presence as he became from this point their preacher of doom for the next years to come. Alex Skolnick, although not having that technical quality on this record that he got us used to over the years, was already showing signs of a real guitar whiz kid…
“The Legacy” in my perspective, is a very well deserved kick in the ass to all of those that think Testament are some cheaters and that they are not capable of writing anything of enjoyable. Nothing can be as aggressive as this one for a thrash debut record. Really essential Bay Area influenced stuff…