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Motörhead - Motörizer - 85%

ThrashManiacAYD, September 11th, 2009

All readers of this review will I'm sure accept that Lemmy is the one true King of all that is rock n' roll and so not require me to sell his virtues, but just to do so anyway, here again is the King with his long-time backers Phil Campbell and Mikkey Dee on what is now the 20th studio album of the quintessential Motörhead. Quite understandably for a band as experienced as Motörhead, their form has come and gone since 1977's self-titled debut LP but the last few releases have seen a renaissance of the band if such a thing can be said, resulting in yet another hard-rocking belter in "Motörizer" that belies Mr. Kilmister's 63 years (!) and adds another reason for their God-like status.

Just consider the fact that in tunes like the body-shaking "English Rose", the down'n'out punk/speed metal of "Rock Out" and the sleaze of "Runaround Man", Motörhead have penned more fantastic anthems of rock whilst having barely altered from the rigid formula perfected in over 30 years of music-making is a huge achievement. In a world where countless styles have come and gone in such a time to have one band steadfastly walking their own path and ignoring everything else is an astounding testament to Motörhead and is the main reason why "Motörizer" rocks harder than anything released today by guys a third of Lemmy's age. Little differs in the make-up of "Motörizer" against albums such as "Ace Of Spades" where the same gravel-throated Lemmy curdles out his tales of rock, love and personal pride except for a sharper tone from Campbell's guitar that serves to add extra grit and spite to "Heroes" and "Teach You How To Sing The Blues". Drummer Mikkey Dee, perhaps less influential in the momentum of the band these days than Phil "Philthy Animal" Taylor of the classic Motörhead period, is however so solid that one barely notices him pummeling away in the background, providing the backbone upon which Campbell and Kilmister's riffs clatter along.

By virtue of their recording in a distant era, the likes of "Ace Of Spades" and "Killed By Death" will never be equaled, leaving Motörhead to carry on penning an album of tunes in the name of "Motörizer" that possess more than enough strength to hold their own against such rock landmarks. There is no need for a scrupulous study on the finer points of any Motörhead record but rest assured that if you are reading this as a diehard Motörfreak or a convert-in-waiting, there is no way you will be let down by "Motörizer". Long live the King.

Originally written for Rockfreaks.net