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Mortis Mutilati - Nameless Here for Evermore - 70%

ptsc, April 12th, 2014

Once upon a midnight dreary …

I’ve always had a soft spot for French Black Metal. I just love this totally obscure stuff they produced back in the Nineties, and I also like those endlessly depressing, doomy Sounds a lot of French bands have nowadays – it really helps when the sun comes penetrate my being. Mortis Mutilati is a one-man-project of Moonreichs Macabre that came to its unholy life in 2011. Since then, Macabre has been very productive, so Nameless Here For Evermore already is the second full-length album that was released through German underground label Naturmacht Production. “Funeral Metal” is what Macabre calls his music, and according to that, the album is, of course, depressive and dark. The good news first: Macabre does not sound like a flock of endlessly tormented souls that scream in agony at the world, sounding like the dying cries of some sort of sacrificial animal, like most his colleagues in depressive Black Metal do – and that’s what makes Nameless Here For Evermore more than just bearable.

Macabres relatively deep screams sound more like old school and is for me a perfect vehicle for his songs, making Mortis Mutilati stand out in the vast fields of depressive and somewhat suicidal Black Metal. As you may have guessed from the title, Nameless Here For Evermore loosely circles around Poe’s famous “Raven”-poem and is pitch black atmosphere compressed on a CD; it’s a nightly stroll over dark, niveous cemetery, all black and white, all sound suppressed by the snowy coat. The latter goes for the production, that is adequately dull, but not too bad. The guitars are in the foreground, strong riffs dominating the steady songs, thus creating this dense atmosphere (but could’ve been a little more dominant for my ears). Especially the variations in composing and arrangements are really good, Macabre shows he’s got an ear for that kind of melancholic sound. Even an organ is masterfully included (“Neige De Sang”). Nameless Here For Evermore leaves little to wish for, and it certainly never gets dull or monotone.

What lifts Mortis Mutilati off the deep swamp of rather depressive sounding bands in Black Metal (seriously: there are bands in this subgenre I cannot listen to without wanting to bang my head repeatedly with a club!) beside Macabres great voice is that the tempo is relatively high. Of course, Mortis Mutilati is miles away from blastbeat, even in the faster parts and songs, but on average a lot faster that most depressive Black Metal Bands. Nameless Here For Evermore is closer to Black Metal that to this suicidal Doom, and that’s what makes the difference for me. Mortis Mutilati does not lose itself in the depression, but uses it to create a sound so dense, spring doesn’t stand a chance against it – you just remain in this endless night at the cemetery, mourning, and everything feels like a 1920ies silent black and white horror movie. In short: Nameless Here For Evermore is a fine piece of (Funeral) Black Metal you should not miss!