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Sloppy and Falls Off - 60%

StainedClass95, July 26th, 2014

This has some really good songs, but it also has some much weaker songs. The production is bad even on the remaster, and it adds to the general sloppy vibe. This is the first line-up for Megadeth, and though it made a masterpiece later, this is just mediocre as a full listen.

I'll start with the positive. The first few songs are very good, and would have felt fine on their succeeding masterstroke. Supposedly, Mustaine's guitar rhythms were very different from what was normal at that time. I can't say for sure, but I will say that most of them are quite good and varied. The opening riff to Looking Down the Cross is amongst my favorites by them. The drumming is the last positive I will name. His jazzy style is very enjoyable for me, and I find the sloppy nature of the production only enhances his creativity.

Next, the neutral. Mustaine employs his snarl here, but it's different than it would be later. He's younger, so his voice is higher pitched than it was even on the follow-up. As well, he has a drunken character to his voice. It's not bad, and it fits the the sloppy nature of the songs, but it's not really good either. He doesn't seem to use the different voices he became known for, as these are all relatively samey. His lyrics don't have the focus of some of his later works. This has no cynical outlook on society or government, and one of them's about a bunny, but most are ok. The solos aren't what they would later be, but they're alright. I can't easily tell who is soloing when, but it doesn't matter too much. While the bass isn't as audible or interesting as he would later be, he's still easier for me to hear than most bassists.

Now, the negatives. For one, the production is abysmal. The original is almost as bad as Reek, which says quite a bit. Even the remaster is worse than any album they would do later. I'm rather impressed by how people could even tell if the riffing was ahead of it's time. The next problem is how quickly the album falls off. Nothing after track three is even above-average. The cover and The Mechanix are just godawful. I get why hardcore Megadeth fans will defend this song, but if wasn't for the Four Horseman, Mustaine himself probably wouldn't have bothered with this song. As I alluded to earlier, the lyrics are also pretty bad on a couple of songs, which combined with occasionally loud vocals, can make for an unpleasant listen. Toss in that the album is short to begin with, and this should have just been an EP.

Someone could complain that I'm not being fair considering the rating I gave to Metal Church. It's true that album has a big quality dip as well, but that was distinctly different. That had two metal classics to kick it off, and then it was followed by average to a little above songs. Nothing on there, save possibly the ballad, was bad. This has three good to very good songs, followed by five mostly below-average ones. Whatever could have happened to make these later songs passable didn't. What score it does get is due to those first three and some scattered riffs that are good on their own. I would recommend a thrash fan ripping the first three songs, and pretending that this was a short EP.

Beginning Of The Business - 95%

electricfuneral9719, August 5th, 2013

Out of all the big four début albums, this, in my opinion, is the best of them. You can point to Metallica's 'Kill 'Em All' all you want, but that won't change the fact that 'Killing Is My Business... And Business Is Good' is a far more aggressive, heavy and technically proficient effort. Plus, you can't deny that some of these songs, such as 'Rattlehead' and 'Mechanix' are bona fide metal classics. If there was any more proof you needed that Megadeth set out to top Metallica, this is it.

Dave Mustaine's vocals are often a polarising factor within the metal community; some people cite them as the reason they don't like Megadeth, while others see them as perfectly representative of what the music needed. I personally lean towards the latter as his performance is one of the many things that makes this album lively and ferocious, even if he sounds absolutely insane at certain points on the album such as the maniacal laughing towards the end of 'Last Rites/Loved To Deth'. For me though, these points are thoroughly entertaining and give the album a lot more character.

One thing that cannot be argued with, however, is the quality of the guitar playing; Mustaine was a phenomenal riffer right from the first Megadeth song ever wrote, 'Mechanix'. You know, the one Metallica stole, slowed it down, added a bridge and called it 'The Four Horsemen'? Well, it sounds much better in its original state; fast, destructive and uncompromising. Anyway, the riffs on this album range from the simple ('Chosen Ones') to the complex (the title track) and they're all great. Also, Mustaine always brought along brilliant lead guitarists with him, and Chris Poland was certainly no exception; him and Mustaine play blisteringly fast and technical solos throughout every song and there isn't one that fails to live up to this standard (although that may be a point of criticism for some).

The rhythm section is similarly great, as the bass and drums are both clear and powerful. David Ellefson offers some impressive bass fills like at about 2:20 on 'Chosen Ones' and Gar Samuelson shows an extreme amount of stamina on 'Mechanix'. Dave Mustaine always chose the perfect musicians to perform with, even from the first album.

Megadeth's debut was and still is a prime example of a band starting out so high that it would be difficult to beat (even though they did and deserve immense respect for that). The ill-advised cover of 'These Boots' aside, this album has very few flaws (I do not see the initial raw production as a flaw, just if you're wondering) and shows masses of potential. It is also a bit underrated, as the band don't play many songs from the album today, which is a shame, because this is one of Megadeth's best.

A fast and furious debut, albeit a very raw one - 77%

psychosisholocausto, April 11th, 2013

Certain parallels shall forever be drawn between Megadeth and Metallica but it is only on the debut of the former that the two cross over. Killing Is My Business was an album that came about following Megadeth frontman Dave Mustaine's forced departure from Metallica. This is one release that you can not forget due to its balls to the wall attitude found throughout. Whereas Metallica were slightly more stream lined and always had a degree of melody to them, Killing Is My Business is a release that keeps its foot firmly on the accelerator and hand firmly to your throat.

The reasons for Mustaine's departure vary depending on who you are to ask but one thing is certain-his removal from Metallica was a blessing in disguise. Who knows if he had remained in that band what the out come would have been. Would there ever have been Master Of Puppets or Rust In Peace-two of the best known and most highly valued thrash metal releases? Both bands went on to release a good run of classic albums but of the two it was Megadeth who started out the best. Their debut is a slab of pure unadulterated speed metal unlike anything out there with intense guitar work and unrivaled fury behind the vocals. And all this starts off with... A piano line?

Loved To Deth is a great way to begin an album of such colossal magnitude as Killing Is My Business with the titular words forever remaining embedded in your mind after you first hear Dave's tortured voice spew them out. After the brief piano introduction this dives straight into the fastest material Megadeth have ever recorded that still maintains a fair degree of technicality that they would expand upon following this album. When you look past the undeniably fuzzy production (it really is awful) this album is an absolute gem that delivers nothing but ass kicking songs. Rattlehead in particular sticks out as a song that is somewhat in line with the NWOBHM style of guitar work and the numerous lead licks and guitar solos that would later form the basis for a number such as the title track to Peace Sells.

One song that every Megadeth and Metallica fan will have conflicting opinions on is Mechanix. This track weaves a twisted web that speaks of having sex with a girl and uses various metaphors relating to cars and mechanic work. It is not the lyrics that stick out however, nor the riff work but in fact it is the story behind it. This was one of four songs that Dave Mustaine wrote whilst with Metallica that the band went on to use on their first studio album, Kill Em All, under the name of The Four Horsemen. In a drugged up rage Dave decided that he was going to strike back at his old band by re-recording this track with his new band Megadeth under its original name with the original lyrics. No matter which version you personally prefer there is no denying the impact that comes with hearing such a lightning fast collection of riffs and demented vocal performance from Dave.

The aforementioned problem with the production is a major set back for those first getting into this album, particularly if you are not well versed with foul production jobs already. Similar to many thrash debuts, this is a low budget release due to the fact the band spent much of the original allocated budget on drugs and booze so they were left with just a small chunk of what they were originally granted. This low cost also spread onto the album art work which was not in line with Dave's original visions for the art work but instead, quite frankly, sucks. The guitar work on here is fuzzy and the bass is scarcely audible whilst the drums carry a flat tone and the cymbals just destroy the mixing job completely. Dave's vocals are also mixed too loud so that everything that was already difficult to hear now becomes nigh on impossible to distinguish.

The vocal performance on here is a subject of much debate as with many albums by this band. Some love Dave's overly nasally voice and his characteristic snarl as they feel it perfectly embodies what he strives to achieve with the lyrical content-the snark, sarcastic, snide lyricism that he loves to utilize. On here however he really does not do a good job. Whilst on later releases he is not exactly the best singer of his generation he is at least listenable and suits the style of music a lot better with much lower tones to his voice and a considerable amount of force behind making himself sound as aggressive as he possibly can. On Killing Is My Business he feels weak and usually very whiny and whilst the anger is there it is not used nearly as well as on other Megadeth releases.

The guitar work on Killing Is My Business is its real selling point. It is fast and straight to the point with no strings attached-the riffs are as quick as one can imagine and twice as creative; the soloing flies by at the speed of light with numerous solos per song and the dual guitar assault works very well. The riffs to songs such as The Skull Beneath The Skin and Mechanix stick out as some of the best. The guitar work on here is almost always thundering along as fast as humanly possible so that the notes are very hard to make out; especially when the production is factored in. The drumming keeps a solid beat whilst never sticking out as being particularly creative but is still nice to hear and helps the music move along at a quick pace. Not a lot of comments can really be made on the bass given that it is completely inaudible, buried beneath a sandbag of riffs.

This is a solid debut from Megadeth that combines so many good riffs with a whole bucket of aggression that it is hard to over look this in discussions about the best thrash debut.

Killing Is My Business... and this album is good - 95%

torment159, July 20th, 2010

Dave Mustaine having just had four of his songs stolen from him and every guitar solo he’d ever written played by a guitarist that isn’t half creative or talented as himself, he’s pissed off. So what does he do? He finds a bassist and two incredibly talented jazz fusion musicians and writes a genuinely angry and pissed off thrash metal album that is faster, better, and more complex than anything his previous band had done. The newly recruited jazz musicians are Chris Poland and Gar Samuelson, whose different style of playing brought an entirely different feel to this thrash metal album. Although Dave actually plays most of the solos on this album Chris’ style seemed to have rubbed off on him in his song writing. The songs he wrote on this album are more technical than anything previously played by a thrash metal band, some even describe them as sounding jazzy. Not only is Megadeth’s Killing is my Business one of the best thrash debuts, it is also one of the best thrash metal records.

Not only is Dave pissed off about Metallica, he’s also pissed that he can’t get this girl named Diana Aragon. So he writes what he considers a love song. The first song on the album Last Rites/Loved to Death is about a guy who falls in love with a girl but the girl doesn’t love him so he kills her and no one can have her. Dave’s a pretty romantic guy. Dave has explained the guitar part of the song as expressing the sexual frustration of being denied who he wanted. It is one of the few thrash metal songs I can say has real emotion in it.

The title track is a kinda silly song written about the comic book The Punisher. A hit man is hired to assassinate someone and when he is done also kills his employer who was marked for assassination also. The songs riffs and drumming are incredible and it is one of the few songs on this album to feature a Chris Poland solo, which is incredible also. Some people say Dave’s voice sounds like a wounded duck but on songs like this one no one’s voice could have done better.

The next two songs Skull Beneath The Skin and Rattlehead are about Vic Rattlehead, Megadeth’s mascot. Rattlehead is the other song on the album that features a Chris Poland solo. Chris Poland plays the guitar licks between each verse. When Chris was younger he suffered from a finger injury that severed one of his tendons on his left hand. This injury allowed Chris to play notes physically impossible to reach by other players on this song.

People always associate Megadeth with politically and serious lyrics,, but most of the songs on this album are actually pretty silly. Chosen Ones was written by Dave Mustaine about the Killer Rabbit from Monty Python’s In Search Of The Holy Grail movie. The guitar riffing is jerky and shows some punk influence. Dave Ellefson plays a bass solo near the end of the song one of the only times he really stands out of this album.

Looking Down The Cross puts the album back into a serious mood. In this song Dave puts himself in Jesus’ shoes. The song starts out sad sounding and builds up to a very angry sounding end. This is one of the best songs on the album although they are all good.

Sadly the next song can’t quite stand up to Looking down The Cross, Dave being the kind of guy he is, wasn’t gonna let Metallica take his song from him. So he recorded Mechanix, which has the same riffs and solos as Four Horseman, without the added slowed tempo part of Four Horseman. Dave sings his original lyrics about his job at a gas station and fantasizing about all the rich pretty girls that would come by. Dave wanted to prove that his new band was better and faster than Metallica so he decided to play this song way too fast. The entire song sounds sloppy like they did it all in one take. The drums even go off beat for a little bit. Megadeth didn’t seem to put the time they put into other songs into this song. If played more neatly it would be a great track but the way it is it is one of the weakest on the album.

Mechanix is not the weakest track on the album, These Boots is. These Boots is a cover song and it doesn’t fit in with the album at all. It is a truly bad song and without it the album would have nearly no flaws, but sadly it was included and the album has a hole in its almost perfect track list.

The songs on the album are all nearly flawless but the production is lacking. Dave was given 8000 dollars to record an album and he wasted half of it on booze and dope so he had very little money left for recording time. They had to record this album fast and that makes the production sloppy. On the original recording you can barely hear Gar’s bass drum. If you are looking to get this album I recommend the remastered version. Other than that, it is a great album to own if you like thrash metal, it has only three flaws, the sloppiness of Mechanix, the terrible filler song These Boots, and the production quality on the original release.

It's good but it lacks something - 75%

evermetal, October 30th, 2009

Everybody knows the story of Dave Mustaine in Metallica, his departing, the quarrels etc. though there are some secrets and unexplained reasons in my opinion. When he formed his own band, Megadeth, things were a bit difficult for them since many thought he was to blame for what had happened and that he was a nasty character. But that didn’t stop him. Shortly after, Megadeth debut was released with the inspired title Killing is my Business…and Business is Good! The skull on the cover appeared in later albums as well.

Their first attempt possessed all the elements of a thrash metal album: rage, speed and irritating mood. It contains eight primitive compositions dedicated to the blood-thirsty god of speed/thrash who at that time had many demands. The quality of the music was quite good considering the facts but was not supported by the awful, lousy production. I could say that Killing… continues from where Kill ‘Em All left off. It is rough, speed metal, full of nervous riffs and solos and Mustaine’s weird vocals. The truth is that he chose to sing only because he had to. So, we should not have many expectations from this album. Let’s just settle to the fact that it serves the art of headbanging very well and lets out a great amount of energy.

The opening song, Last Rites/Loved to Death begins with a strange piano intro but speeds up with fast riffs and a mood to kick you in the ass. None of the musicians is a virtuoso but who needs technique, we are not talking progressive here but mad-thrashing metal. Surely this one is a song that stands out. As for Mustaine’s vocals, you’ll either love them or hate them! It would have been better if they had just waited a little longer to find a proper singer to fit the songs.

The self-titled one is also very good, exposing once again their will to kill through their music and not feed your head with melodies and complicated stuff. The fast guitars, smashing simple drumming and angry singing are found in each and every song of this album. The speedy tempos leave you no time to breathe and grab you from the neck. Still, as said before, the songs asphyxiate due to the poor production and that’s too bad for compositions like Rattlehead that could have been so much better. There is also Mechanix, a song based on the structure of The Four Horsemen, but with a blacker mood and feeling. However the cover of Nancy Sinatra’s These Boots is a very bad choice and very bad played as well.

Summing-up, Megadeth do a pretty decent work, killing every sense of melody and harmony in their music. Killing… is not a bad album at all but it lacks something. Maybe they needed to have paid more attention during the song-writing until some new ideas had come up. Another disadvantage is that many people make the mistake to compare it with Mettalica’s debut which is very unjust for Megadeth who only want to play good music for their future fans. The controversy that started from the very beginning mostly harmed them. Still the future looks good and that was proved a year later. Their fans surely possess their debut. The rest should definitely check it out if you like noisy metal.

Where It All Started - 92%

1stMetalheads, May 12th, 2008

Being the latest of the big four debuts, this is easily the most developed. After being kicked out of Metallica a couple years earlier, Dave Mustaine had alot of anger, and it shows. Even on the more humorous songs in this album, a sense of anger is throughout. Dave Mustaine pulls out some incredible chops, and fuels every solo with pure aggression, he also commits a fitting, if weaker, voice to the music. Gar Samuelson also provides some complex drum tracks, while Chris Poland adds some atmospheric solos to the mix.

The first thing you notice when you put in the CD is the piano. Some would think this doesn't fit the music, but Dave quickly shows as it provides a haunting opposite to what the entire album is filled with, anger. Last Rites (containing the piano) seeps this emotion of betrayal and blind rage through every pore, and this sort of emotion is heard on every song except the less spectacular Chosen Ones. Of particular note is The Skull Beneath The Skin. This song is just plain evil, with almost snake-like solos, incredible vocals from Dave and lyrics that explain how the mascot came about. My favorite song from the album, Looking Down The Cross, is from the eyes of Jesus, as he's about to go to the cross and says his last words. This song is clearly the hottest of the inferno, and provides interesting lyrics that condemn the church for all the sins they've committed.

So far, this has been basically a rant about how good this album is (Don't blame me, it's really that good.) but every album has a negative. And the biggest one is related to the strongest part, the themes of the music. While each song provides a clear representation of its material, it doesn't have much consistency. Skull Beneath The Skin, containing lyrics about sacrifice goes straight into Rattlehead which is about head-banging, Looking Down The Cross goes straight into a song about a gas-station mechanic banging girls (Yeah, that's what it's really about, sounded better before, huh?). This is jarring, and keeps the album from full listens. Two songs from this album just aren't as good as they could be. Chosen Ones just doesn't perform as well across the board, and Rattlehead seems like it could be so much better.

Overall, this is an excellent album, and I'd recommend it to anyone who likes thrash metal.

Highlights: Last Rites/Loved To Deth, Looking Down The Cross

Fantastic Debut - 89%

MEGANICK89, January 31st, 2008

Dave Mustaine has always to be known of man with quite a temper and after Metallica booted him, Dave was a bit angry and this transformed into the Megadeth debut aptly titled "Killing is my Business...and Business is Good." Dave was out to prove that he was the fastest and the best and there was no better way to start out. This is pure, raw thrash at its finest and a must have for any thrasher and Megadeth fan.

The opening track shows what's about to come in this album. From the creepy little piano intro to the blazing guitar in "Last Rites", this track is head rattler for sure. Chris Poland and Dave Mustaine make quite the guitar team with the perfect combination of Dave thrashing and Poland bringing some melody into it. The beginning of "Skull Beneath the Skin" is one of the best openers of any song featuring wicked, crawling guitar playing and the song bursts out into a solo and is one the best songs on this album. The pace changes though with "Looking Down the Cross" which is a brooding track and gives quite a scary atmosphere to it which makes it sound like something you would hear at a black funeral, not that I have been to one, but this is what I would imagine it like.

"Mechanix" is the track that "The Four Horseman" by Metallica orginally was. "Mechanix" has more speed to it and would tear the other version to shreds based on pure speed, but a person might like the "The Four Horseman" better because it has more arrangements and goes a bit slower, but you cannot go wrong with both. "These Boots" is the controversial song on here becausing Megadeth took Lee Hazlewood's popular song and basically made a thrashy, dirty lyric version of it and Lee did not take kindly to it. In the 2002 remaster version, some of the words are bleeped out in this song. I'm not sure if it was like that on the orginal, but that's how it is on this version.

Speaking of the 2002 remastered version, the album sounds much better obviously. and the raw, poor production can be overlooked because the album sounds so much better and cleaner than the original so make sure to buy the 2002 version.

In the end, this is an album that should be bought and should be bought right now. You will not be disappointed as this is a shining star in the thrash world. Dave is fierce with the vocals and it translates to the fierce guitar shredding. So buy this. Love this. Get this.

What a debut - 90%

morbert, May 25th, 2007

I read somewhere this album was underrated? I wonder why. I've never met a metalhead who didn't like this album. That's saying a lot isn't it. A lot has already written about this album here on Metal Archives, but I want to have my go as well. 'Killing is my Business...and Business Is Good' is definately in the top 3 of best Megadeth albums ever.

Metallica/Megadeth:
Everyone knows the story. This Megadeth debut offers more technical riffs and better drumming than 'Kill'em All' did. Personally I prefer the somewhat slower 'Four Horsemen' over 'Mechanix' due to the vocals, dynamics and the middle section of the song. Apart from that Megadeth present some superior riffs on their debut compared to Metallica being fairly straightforward on their debut. The riffs on 'Love You To Death', the uptempo part of the titletrack and 'Rattlehead' are nothing less than mindblowing.

Compositions:
I consider the most diverse songs to be the best here. With diverse I mean the tracks that fluently change pace, being 'Love You To Death', 'Rattlehead' and 'Killing Is My Business'. The uptempo material really reigns supreme. Not that I dislike all his midtempo material of course but on ‘Killing is my business’ the songs are more effective when the pace is increased. 'Chosen Ones' is far from impressive and on 'Looking Down The Cross' the main midtempo riff in the verse could have come straight from one of the first three Ozzy Osbourne solo-albums. The material here is mostly speedmetal with some hints to thrash metal.

Performance:
Simply outstanding. Mustaine and Poland bring the riffs and solos with such precision. Every single note can be made out. Samuelson is an excellent drummer. Can't say anything more. This is some perfect work here. Ellefson is adquate here but not as outstanding as he would prove to be an later albums. Mustaine's vocals are adequate as well.

Production/cover:
The production is thin and clear. This helps bringing definition to the material. Though it's not heavy it certainly does the trick. The albumcover is of course pretty lame and one of the worst in Megadeth history.

Conclusion:
Great start. One of their best albums ever together with 'Peace Sells' and 'Rust in Peace'.

Vic's late yet triumphant debut. - 92%

hells_unicorn, April 16th, 2007

If someone who was an expert at the general history of thrash was by some odd coincidence not familiar with MegaDeth listened to this album, he would probably conclude that it was recorded in 1984 and composed a few years before. Like many of the first offerings in the thrash genre, every song is lightning fast and loaded with flash solos, not to mention a vocal delivery that relies more on rawness and attitude than skill and precision. However, one aspect of this album that separates it from the fold, even when considering how late it was by the standard of the genre, is Dave Mustaine’s rather unique approach to songwriting.

Dave’s quasi-classical tendencies jump out at the listener from the intro “Last Rites”, which gives this otherwise primitive thrash album a somewhat epic feel. The second half of the opening song “Love you to Death” follows all speed, zero niceness approach that Mustaine originally suggested his ex-band mates in Metallica follow. The beginning of “Looking down the Cross” also defies the textbook approach that Hetfield and company followed on their debut and incorporates some quasi-Sabbath sounding doom elements, not all that dissimilar from Overkill’s “Raise the Dead” actually.

The area of this album where MegaDeth holds the edge over most of the competition, most particularly Kirk Hammet, is the lead guitar department. Both Mustaine and Poland avoid the cliché sound of an angry man venting with repetitive shred licks and create solos that are both methodically structured and individual in character. The former has his moment of triumph on “Mechanix”, a solo which is probably better known on Metallica’s debut, albeit played by someone who never could have composed it. Poland has various moments of brilliance on “Skull beneath the skin” and the title track, where note quantity does not supplant their quality.

Although complexity is a noteworthy feature of this album, it is also important to note the strength that is exhibited through the purely fast and simplistic numbers. “Chosen Ones” is short, but sweet, assaulting the ears with a barrage of speed riffs that puts “Hit the Lights” on notice. “Rattlehead” succeeds in being the most catchy, mosh worthy, and one of my top 5 favorites in the genre. It attacks with the same viciousness as Anthrax’s “Deathrider”, while exhibiting a similar sense of polish as can be heard on Metallica’s “Trapped under Ice”, although it doesn’t share the slick production.

Like any good heavy guitar player who didn’t contemplate killing himself every time he wrote a song, Mustaine is not without a sense of comedy. Although the censors who continue to insist that his remake of the Nancy Sinatra classic “These Boots” is not fit for our consumption can’t be bothered with cracking even a little smile, I can’t help but be tickled pink both by how ridiculously fast and lyrically profane it is. It rivals somewhat less vulgar joke songs such as Priest’s “Eat me alive” and challenges the super unfettered satirical mayhem of Storm Troopers of Death. However, I can’t tell which is funnier, the unedited version I downloaded a year ago, or the bleeped out on my CD. Anyone who thinks that a teenager hasn’t heard what Dave is saying before is definitely worthy of being chuckled at.

To those of you who have yet to obtain this album, the recent re-master also provides you with the 3 tracks from the “Last Rites” demo, a powerful bonus to accompany what is already a solid album. If you liked the Anthrax and Metallica debuts, this will definitely leave your neck just as sore and the imaginary bells around your head ringing just as loud. It’s not the most shinning example of a slick production, and it’s barely over a half hour long, but it packs a punch that will leave your head rattling well into next week.

Megadeth's most primal offering. - 78%

erickg13, January 19th, 2007

Everyone knows the story of Dave Mustaines unceremonious ousting from Metallica right before recording their debut. And most could understand the feelings of Dave Mustaine at this time: anger, frustration, rage, passion, hostility, the list goes on. So it comes as no surprise that Megadeth’s debut, “Killing is My Business…..And Business is Good!”, contains a hostile edge throughout.

With “Killing is My Business…..And Business is Good!” Megadeth embarked on a journey that over time lead them to become top dog of the metal community. However, on this we still have young, excited, possibly unfocused, musicians. Those qualities result in a brew of primal, raging thrash, but not the best material they would make in their career.

Also, Dave Mustaines vocals, never his strongest asset, sound amateurish at best. Latter on it developed into a sarcastic sneer, but at this point it’s still just a whine. However he provides a very solid rhythm and lead guitar role, and while not the refined style of later work, it works very good on this album.

What about the rest of the band? Well, Dave Ellefson’s bass work is solid on “Killing is My Business…..And Business is Good!”, but just like the rest of the band, it’s a pretty raw offering from him. Chris Poland provides a solid, but largely unspectacular, performance on guitar. And lastly is drummer Gar Samuelson, who provides, as it seems all the members did, a solid, yet unspectacular performance.

As for the material on “Killing is My Business…..And Business is Good!”, its exactly what you would expect from Megadeth, just a lot rawer. There is a lot of undeveloped songs present, and it has very little virtuosity emphasis on later albums. But the upside of the this lack of emphasis on technical skill lets the raw anger drive this album. As far as for highlights of “Killing is My Business…..And Business is Good!”, there are the opener “Last Rites/Loved to Death”, “Skull Beneath the Skin”, and “Mechanix”. Most of the other songs, while not necessarily lacking, are just kind of there. Also, the Nancy Sinatra cover in “These Boots” is barely more than a joke, and the edited version on the remastered edition is negligible.

Overall “Killing is My Business…..And Business is Good!” is a solid, but largely unspectacular album. And for those who must compare it to Metallicas debut, “Kill ‘Em All”, they were no doubt ahead of them, however we must remember that Dave Mustaine largely helped make that album too. So for fans of thrash this is an essential release, despite its shortcomings.

A Debut Unparalleled - 97%

DawnoftheShred, October 18th, 2006

At the beginning of the 80's, thrash metal was in its infancy, and it showed in the debuts of all the major players. Kill 'Em All was primitive. Show No Mercy sounds nothing like anything Slayer would go on to do. Even Bonded by Blood, though superior to its successors aggression-wise, lacked the complexity of their later albums. But Megadeth was different. When Killing is my Business finally hit the scene mid-1985, it showed the band just a hint shy of their creative peak and forged enough momentum to last them through four classic albums. The first of these, KimB still stands as a model album and displays a combination of technique and intensity that few other bands have yet to match.

The first (and generally the last) word when discussing Megadeth among their peers is technique. The band had it in droves and displayed it thoroughly. Don't bore me with your H-team. In 1985, the most effective guitar tag team in metal was Dave Mustaine and Chris Poland. Even if you don't mention the solos (which are numerous and fantastic), you could laud the insanity of their rhythm playing for decades. "Loved to Deth" was still ahead of its time, even as late as '85, for the complexity of its arrangement as well as the furious technicality of its riffs (played a few bpms faster than one would believe possible for their intricacy). Plus the album opens with that chilling variation of Bach's Fugue in D. A thrash album with a piano intro. Brilliant, I say. And even when it's not double-time all-the-time (the snare that most of the modern thrash bands fall into; that this is the only competent way to thrash aggressively), the band performs at the same level. "Chosen Ones," "The Skull Beneath the Skin," and the title track all feature the skull-busting beats of Gar Samuelson and the mighty bass work of Dave Ellefson, as well as with said shredding from Mustaine and Poland.

But the other integral element of this album, that which makes it so compelling to this date, is the sonic intensity. Fueled by Mustaine's rage, this album is aggressive and scathing even when it's being melodic or suspenseful. While Dave's fangs would soon be dripping with politcal sarcasm, here they reek only of venom and bile. Whether he's playing the lover scorned, the sniper assassin, the bystander to the crucifixtion of Christ, or even the more humerous roles of lustful gas station attendant and holy pilgrim, his signature snarl constantly hints at unspoken invective towards his former bandmates. This is pissed-off in stereo, and it fuels some of the finest thrash songs ever written.

Whether you're new to the band or a seasoned rattlehead, it's hard to keep still with this album blasting through your speakers. And its still but a glimpse at what is to follow. Rattle your goddamn head.

Good debut, needs better production - 77%

music_shadowsfall, July 2nd, 2004

Megadeth's debut is one of those albums that could have been absoloutely amazing... if the production had been better. The songwriting on this album is incredible, and a taste of Dave's songwriting talents which would develop on later albums. This is Megadeth at their least structured, and what comes out is a good melodic thrash album.

There are only a couple of problems with this album. The first, is, as already mentioned, the production. While it is nowhere near the atrocity of production known as St. Anger, it could use some work. The lead guitar can be unclear at times, and the rhythm guitar's volume is way too low. The drums could also do with getting their volume lowered. With all these production problems, and because many of the songs sound the same, the songs tend to blur into each other. Dave Mustaine's vocals at this point are also pretty annoying, but luckily they get better in later albums.

The highlights are the title trach which has a great chorus that is very fun to sing along with. Mechanix is a faster and better version of the Four Horsemen, although Dave's vocals are especially annoying on that track. Rattlehead also has some kickass riffs, and is a nice little thrash track. Looking Down on the Cross is the best song here, and has some excellent lead guitar and great riffs. The other songs are good, though nothing special, with the exception of the cover of These Boots, which pretty much sucks. I mean, the guitar is good, but Mustaine's vocals are as annoying as ever, and all those beeps in the song get pretty damn annoying.

Well, there we have it. This is not Megadeth's best release, and they definitely do get better as time goes on, but for a debut it is pretty damn good and has some excellent songs to its name. A must buy for all Megadeth fans and all thrash fans should at least download it.

Poor production and too many versions, but ok - 89%

HealthySonicDiet, April 15th, 2004

Megadeth's debut album Killing Is My Business...and Business is Good is a fairly decent album, but it suffers from poor production and too many versions. This album has three versions and it confused the hell out of me when I tried to write the tracklisting down for this after I had copied it. Maybe I'm just an idiot, but it gave me a headache, and I believe I still ended up writing the damned thing down wrong.

Anyway, KIMB shows Megadeth in their rawest form, arguably. Mustaine's vocals are still the same as they are on later releases, but they are somehow stuck in Reverb Land. Poor production pushes his vocals to the background(though they never were that prominent in the first place, at least strength-wise).

Every song on here is pretty much straightforward thrash, and I believe right after this album Megadeth started experimenting more and further stylizing their sound. Peace Sells is somewhat similar to this, but there are further touches on that that aren't found here. The riffing is still jarring, intense, and very quick, and the overall technicality is still very impressive, but it's hard to enjoy it so much when all the aspects of the music are so jumbled together and not crisp and individual.

The drumming and bass are still super-tight as well. I really don't see why Metallica and Slayer are praised so much. It just seems to me that Megadeth just has the whole package musically, whereas Metallica and Slayer have some glaring faults that have always needed sprucing up. I will give you the fact that both Hetfield and Tony Araya(or whoever the Slayer vocalist is) are stronger singers than Mustaine, but one doesn't necessarily need a 'good' voice to be well-liked in metal....just a highly distinctive one that has its own personality and energy to it.

Well, I've pretty much touched base on everything. Just pick up this album, if not only for the fact that it's a debut album. IMO, debut albums should be pondered and appreciated in a parallel fashion as people are when they are 'debuted' into the world.

Megadeth's Debut KILL'S! - 92%

Demon_of_the_Fall, May 21st, 2003

Originally released in 1985 Killing is my business...and Business is Good! was praised by the metal world although there were some flaws on the album. For one the Production of the album, and as a second note the albums artwork was cheesy as all hell. They had a pickle on the cover of it for chistsakes. Now what we have here 17 years later is an excellent Remastered Version with new cover art. Being a HUGE Megadeth fan I bought this the day it came out even though I had the original. I was wondering how much better it sounded because it is still one of my Favourite albums of all time. I popped the fucker in my car stereo and let it blast out the enterity of Last Rites/Loved to Deth, and was blown away by how much it sounded better. Everything that wasn't so clean on the original was spiced up and turned up into full frontal clarity. The drums and Vocals were especially spiced up in the mix because you can actually hear what Gar Samuelson was playing. I can now say with full enthusiam that Gar was one of the best drummers ever from hearing this remaster. Seeing as i couldn't hear most of what he was playing before. Dave's Vocals sound much better and clean as well, which is an added bonus, because at times before it was either hard to hear his vocals or to loud in some parts. Now i shall stop comparing Remaster/and Original. Too the music now I shall turn. This is one of Metal's finest gems here, as this Thrashterpeice delivered what everyone wanted. All the songs are awesome in their own aspect.

Last Rites/Loved to Deth: Last Rites starts us off on a Journeyful piano intro that doesn't last to long until we are blasted in the face with the first metal offering from Deth. Loved to Deth come with a sweet as guitar lick that sends the band into high speed. The Riffs are blazing and the song is relentless with power in ever instrument. The Lyrics of this song are simply stated boy meets girl, boy falls in love with girl, girl doesn't love boy, boy kills girl so no one else can have her. The song is one of the best Deth songs.

Killing is My Business...And Business is Good!: Another great track from the mighty deth. Mid paced song with a killer first riff that will get your head a banging. When the Vocals come in chanting " I am a Sniper, always hits the mark, Paid Assassin working after dark" you feel very urged to yell the vocals at the top of your lungs. This is a highly infectious track that never gets boring. The song was written about the comic "The Punisher" for more details read the Lyric booklet. I love the double bass by Gar near the end of the track as well, fucking pounding at your...

Skull Beneath The Skin: Has a wierd as fuck guitar intro, and then the song rolling. The song has a killer first solo, with a faced thrashy riff, that rips. The Lyrics are some of the best I ever heard by any band in this song. I can help but read the Lyrics to every song on this album. This song is very good although I can't say it's the best on the album because it's not as memorable, but It still rates up their with the best.

Rattlehead: WELL HERE I COME. This is one of Megadeth's fastest trashiest songs ever. I fucking love this song, and this is by far one of Megadeth's most underated works ever. The guitars, bass, and drums are blazing full speed ahead on this one. Vocals like "It's time for Snapping some Necks, Slashing, thrashing to Megadeth" One of the albums highlights forsure. The solo at the end of the song simply owns!

Chosen Ones: Oh man here is one of my Personal favourite songs by Megadeth. What a killer riff at the start, how can you get any better than this. hahaha also on a humerous note this song was written about Monty Python's (English Humor) The Holy Grial on the Rabbit that devours everyone in the cave of death. Fucking classic song here.

Looking Down the Cross: Holy shit another Classic Deth song that has to be mentioned. How can I start with this song? This is the one song that sounds like it shouldn't be on this album, and by the title you should surely know what your in for. Read the lyrics, im sure you'll understand and if you don't get the remastered and It gives you a description of what each song was about. Looking Down the Cross is very likable, and one of the best.

Mechanix: Is what Dave wrote in Metallica. This is a faster Version of "The Four Horsemen" from his previous band Tallica. Although Metallica added a different riff in their version and new lyrics it's still nothing like this. Mechanix is much faster than Horsemen, and delivers different lyrics. The intro is also changed which gives the song more diversity. Then comes one of the best riffs of all time. You probably all know about this song by now either that or the Tallica song. I highly recomend this track as it just rips.

These Boots: This is a cover of Lee Hazelwood's song These Boot's Were Made for walking.The only problem I hear on this is that some vocals had to be beeped out because Lee didn't want Megadeth using her fucking lyrics. What a bitch, but besides that this is a cool track.

I won't bother mentioning the demo tracks. I've taken up enough room on here now so I'll bring my Remarks to a close. THIS ALBUM RULES!
Thrash Till Deth

Megadeth > Metallica? - 85%

Crimsonblood, February 14th, 2003

When Dave Mustaine started Megadeth and released Killing Is My Business… he wanted it to make it better than Metallica, specifically what they did on their debut Kill ‘Em All. In some places Mustaine succeeded and in other places he didn’t. I think the most obvious aspect where Megadeth surpasses Metallica is the musicianship in the band members. Sure, Metallica had a great bassist in Cliff Burton (R.I.P.) and James Hetfield was respectable in the riff department, but Gar Samuelson (R.I.P.) blows away Lar$ Ulrich behind the kit, and Chris Poland is a hell of a lot better than Kirk Hammett. Of course, Dave Ellefson and Mustaine are no slouches themselves. This higher level of playing ability is really noticeable on this release, especially in the drumming. While Lar$ was far from his worst on Kill ‘Em, the precision and sheer speed of Samuelson really overshadows him. Mustaine wanted this to be faster than Metallica and he definitely succeeded in that. Samuelson was the perfect person for the job as he fills the songs with a lot of double bass and fast fills. Just listen to “Skull Beneath The Skin” and the title track to get a good indication of the speed on here.

However, where the thrashing speed of this disc is definitely a highlight, it’s also a bit of a detriment. While containing some quality riffs, compared to Metallica, or even early Slayer, the riffs aren’t as structured or as memorable. The riffs are by no means bad but since Mustaine wanted this to go head to head with Kill ‘Em All, this is one place where he failed. Even though Mustaine doesn’t have the best singing voice, he sounds so much better than Hetfield did on Kill ‘Em All. Hetfield was just horrible on there and Mustaine sounds brilliant compared to him. Where Mustaine lacks in actual singing ability he makes up for with clever phrasing and vocals that go along with the music very well. The leads from both Poland and Mustaine are also well done as they both have distinct styles that compliment the speedy music well.

Highlights of this CD for me are “Rattlehead”, which is perfect for head-banging, as it was meant to be, as well as the title track which speeds along at a fast pace and contains very good use of doubled vocals. “Mechanix”, Megadeth’s rendition of “The Four Horseman”, is also well done but not quite as progressive or as structured as “The Four Horsemen”. However, I do think this is the best indication of Samuelson vs. Lar$. Try and picture Samuelson playing on “The Four Horsemen” instead of Lar$. You should hear how a really great song could have been even better.

So when all is said and done, did Mustaine defeat James and friends? It’s hard to say. As Boris mentioned in his review, this was released two years after Kill ‘Em All and Metal in general had changed a lot in those two years, but if you ignore that fact, I would say both CD’s are equally enjoyable: Kill ‘Em All has better riffs and song writing, but Killing Is My Business… has better musicianship and more head-banging goodness. I’d say both CD’s are equally enjoyable but for different reasons and should be a part of everyone’s Thrash collection. On a side note, if you haven’t bought this yet, pick up the remaster. The sound is much improved and you get some interesting demo versions of three songs.

Song Highlights: Last Rites/Loved To Death, Killing Is My Business... And Business Is Good, The Skull Beneath The Skin, Rattlehead, and Mechanix.