Register Forgot login?

© 2002-2014
Encyclopaedia Metallum

Best viewed
without Internet Explorer,
in 1280 x 960 resolution
or higher.

Sweet taste of funk - 88%

Metal_Thrasher90, November 27th, 2013

Ritchie left dissatisfied with the direction Purple took on the previous decent record, “Stormbringer”. The departure of the Man in Black made things totally uncertain for the future of the band. They might were able to replace both Gillan and Glover, but a guitarist/song-writer of the level of Blackmore was another story. However, the band decided to go on and chose Tommy Bolin, a young promising musician who was on his finest moment, to take the guitar duties in the new album. That happened in 1975, when 70’s classic rock reached its culmination (“Physical Graffiti”, “Sabotage”, “Wish You Were Here”, etc...), just before its decline and decadence, defeated by the British punk movement. So yes, we could still expect these guys to make something great, although without the magic of Blackmore, the situation didn’t seem promising.

The band definitely didn’t want to get stuck in the past and repeat what they did in the last couple of albums, so they went further into that risky funky direction to make something different and unpredictable from what we heard from Purple before. “I Need Love” and “Gettin’ Tighter” are the most explicit funky tracks here with no doubt, with those characteristic guitar licks, soul background choir and casual rhythms. Well, Purple moved into another musical path but their instrumental brilliance remains splendorous. Once again, they make a stunning display of talent and skills. Their music is still solid, delightful and immaculately developed. The riffs are no longer the only important thing, now melody takes more attention along with vocals. Coverdale’s voice is absolutely remarkable on the whole record, specially on “Lady Luck”, which is straight, simple and very melodic, with his voice becoming the main attraction while instruments support him in a humble way. But that’s an exception, because the progression and elaborated arrangements on “Dealer” and “Owed To “G”” demonstrate the group is still ambitious and insatiable for extended instrumental passages. Bolin’s intense guitar lines take control, performing lenghty pickin’ parts and leading the pack, particularly on the opening tune “Comin’ Home”, whose main intention seems to be introducing the new guitarist to the fans. Bolin didn’t disappoint and made an exhibition of musicianship, versatility (his debut solo record “Teaser” was more into blues, jazz and reggae, rather than funk) and inspiration. His metallic raw riffs on “Love Child” and “Drifter” are pretty weighty and prove that these guys didn’t forget the genuine heavy metal concept of the band. Although the riffs are not repetitive and so insistent, Tommy modifies them during the compositions, defining alternative structures which are properly introduced by Paice’s precise rhythm changes. Everything is professional, well-executed here, with passion. Purple could do no wrong.

The new funky melodic metal sound of these guys worked and made sense, giving us the chance to enjoy another music style, different from anything else they did. This band always refused to make the same album again and again, introducing new elements in their music and many influences from other genres. The many musicians who took part in the several Purple line-ups made that rich variety possible. Mark-IV is one of the most forgotten, sadly. Probably, not the most impressive but very convincing. In fact, it was formed by totally incredible musicians that later gained even bigger popularity. The vocal section, with Coverdale’s charismatic bluesy powerful style and charming presence, along with the Voice of Rock, Mr. Hughes, is magnificent and synchronized in harmony. “You Keep On Movin’” features the most touching emotional vocal work of both guys, reaching another level of cathartic melody, sentiment and passion. I’m not surprised that track is the only one from the album that often appears in Purple compilations, it was chosen to be released as single because makes a difference from the rest, no doubt about it. This time, the contribution of Lord is rather inconspicuous, also on the song-writing process. He was relegated to support the guitar lines of Bolin. Another egocentric rock star might refused to do that, demanding more attention for his performance and presence, but not Lord. He demonstrated he was humble to remain discreet and let Bolin lead the band. Jon gets his moment of glory on “This Time Around”, though, playing al instruments, accompanied by Hughes’s voice completely melancholy. And Glenn and Paice were one of the finest rhythmic sections of the 70’s heavy metal, remarkably precise and providing the songs of technical details, even when this music didn’t require much complexity. Of course, I want to make a special mention about Bolin’s superb contribution and extraordinary abilities, which are unfortunately underrated and ignored still nowadays. He didn’t make us forget about Ritchie, but he made a great job.

Another amusing album by one of the biggest 70’s heavy metal bands, demonstrating their versatility, exploring different music styles and avoiding repetition. The sound here is unique, fresh and admirably creative. Sad this fascinating Mark-IV line-up didn’t last long, they broke-up shortly afterwards, aware of the unstoppable radical changes in the late 70’s rock scene. This would be the last Purple studio record until their surprising comeback, 9 years later. And was we all know, Bolin’s death in 1976 after the band’s disintegration was shocking and tragic. Gone too soon, this guitar legend still had a lot of potential and creativity. One of those terribly underrated guitarists that never get the attention they deserve. RIP (1st August 1951-4th December 1976).

'Who Do We Think We Are' Version 2 - 60%

electricfuneral9719, July 4th, 2013

On the 21st of June, 1975, Deep Purple faced the first departure of one of the three founding members, Ritchie Blackmore. Obviously, this was terrible for the band as his stunning riffs and creative solos drove the band for the last six albums, so they had a dilemma; break up the band and keep its legacy intact, or carry on without a core part of their sound. As I am writing this review, it's clear that the choice was the latter.

It's a good thing then, that Tommy Bolin is not only a pretty damn good guitarist himself, but also is quite close to Blackmore in terms of style. He doesn't do the classically influenced solos, but he had the same appreciation Blackmore had for bluesy riffs. Surprisingly, he replaced Ritchie Blackmore very well and made this album sound like a continuation of 'Stormbringer''s direction.

What a pity it is then, that a fair number of the songs just fail to get a good reaction from the listener. Some of the songs are great, like the triumphant 'Comin' Home' and the entrancing 'This Time Around / Owed To 'G'' and could've improved the previous album in a considerable way. Nevertheless, tracks such as 'Gettin' Tighter' and 'I Need Love' overuse the funk elements of the album to the point of annoyance and don't feel like a natural part to the sound like when the powerful and emotional singing of David Coverdale in the verse 'I Need Love' gives way to him shouting “I NEED LOVE! I NEED LO-OVE!” over a stupidly bouncy and repetitive riff in the chorus. So basically, 'Come Taste The Band' is a contender for the most inconsistent Deep Purple album quality-wise and is an awkward way to close 70s Deep Purple.

The performance here is on par with 'Stormbringer', with not much to say about anyone other than Tommy Bolin. Deep Purple became quite consistent in the quality of the playing from 'In Rock' onwards.

Overall, 'Come Taste The Band' was a clear sign that they needed a break, as the quick succession of Deep Purple albums from 1968 to 1976 was beginning to hurt the quality of their albums from 'Who Do We Think We Are', but 'Burn' temporarily saved them from stagnation with new members to freshen things up. Next time, Deep Purple would finally take their time to suitably release a new album in 'Perfect Strangers'.

The first Whitesnake album - 67%

kalervon, November 14th, 2012

It will dawn on anyone listening to this album that this is not a Deep Purple album. 60% of this line-up having also recorded three consecutive Whitesnake albums, which is as much stability one can expect when thinking of Whitesnake, this could easily be considered as Whitesnake's best album. Plus, two tracks have the word "Love" in the title, which is on par with the average Whitesnake album.

A few interesting facts became known through the years and shed light on this album's composition and overall sound.

The album opens on a weak note. The opening track is more or less a filler song, entirely written and recorded after Hughes was sent to rehab. Hence the low sounding back vocals performed by Bolin (ref. Hughes' interview on excellent documentary: Gettin' Tighter The untold story of the 1975/1976 MKIV World Tour). The track in question, "Comin' Home", doesn't sound anything like Deep Purple and is probably the most generic song ever recorded under the Purple name, even the "Slaves And Masters" stuff has at least the late Rainbow sound. It lyrically evokes the great American rock and roll tradition, just like "Speed King" did on "In Rock" - but contrary to the fresh Hendrix influenced Mk II era, this music is so generic and formulaic it makes the whole thing almost sinister. It is sad to see Purple auto-referencing themselves to a previous line-up, while they were referencing American music. Why lead the album with such a song ? To state that with Bolin, an American, now in the band, they were taking a turn towards "American" music ?

The album is noteworthy for the greatest Hughes/Coverdale duet: "You keep on moving", which was written before things started falling apart, back during the "Burn" sessions. It tops off "Gypsy", of previous album.

There are a few Bolin solo songs with some input by Coverdale (lyrics) that Bolin himself probably didn't think good enough for his solo album, which was recorded only a few months before "Come Taste the Band". Worse, there is a song entirely written by Bolin's long time friend and ex-bandmate Jeff Cook, "Lady Luck". Though it got the Coverdale lyrical treatment, it doesn't sound like Deep Purple. One wonders why it didn't end up on one of Bolin's solo albums, which both contained many Jeff Cook songs. Maybe it was not deemed good enough for Bolin by Bolin himself ? Still more enjoyable than the opening track, and Coverdale would recycle the title again (though not the song) in the late 80s with Whitesnake.

Side B is much better than side A. For instance, "Drifter" has an amazing intro, groove, guitar solo and great blues vocals by Coverdale, though relying heavily on blues clichés as usual. "Love Child" has a very good groove as well (bass punches between vocal lines) and works very well live. The highlight of side A is "Gettin' Tighter", is the only song written entirely by Hughes and Bolin. Hearing Hughes' vocals is refreshing at this point on the album, and the lyrics optimistically document how they wished things were getting between the band (live and otherwise).

Lord's only credited writing contribution is on "This Time Around", an interesting personal number by Hughes. It evolves in an instrumental called "Owed to 'G'", a vehicle for solos and live improvs, as "Mandrake Root" and "The Mule" have been in the past, or "Contact Lost" more recently.

Rehearsal recordings from a few months prior to making the album (and to making Bolin's first solo album) later made available show that Coverdale had already begun working on a ballad ("Say You Love Me") that would end up on his second solo album, "Northwinds", so we know the song existed but was not considered for this album.

On the following tour, Purple added a few songs from Bolin's first solo album "Teaser" in the live set, released pretty much at the same time as "Come Taste The Band", namely "Wild Dogs" and "Homeward Strut". This makes the album even more confusing; why did some Bolin/Cook songs end up as Deep Purple and some others as Bolin solo, and why did they play so much from Bolin's solo albums and butchered Mk II live, not to mention unending improv sessions (sadly not as inspired as during the Mk II era) and revisited classics ("Not Fade Away", "Going Down", "Georgia on my Mind") often ruined by Hughes' screaming ? I think it was clear to anyone in the band that this album was weak, and it seems that since they had prevented Bolin from promoting his own album, they had to let him play some of it during live shows. Clearly, Lord and Paice were losing interest and have revealed in subsequent interviews that they should have left at the same time as Blackmore. It all shows on the album.

Mk III albums "Burn" and "Stormbringer" also lacked cohesion and/or had their weak spots; but they had something which this album lacks (well two things, one being Ritchie Blackmore): a killer opening/title track. This album begins with a generic track and only manages to work its way halfway upwards, barely recovering by the time it ends.

Still, not the worst Deep Purple album to listen to, to this day. Anyone enjoying this should also seek out Bolin's solo albums, early Whitesnake and David Coverdale solo. Actually, Bolin's first solo album ("Teaser") should be sold together with this one, for everyone to see what Mk IV Purple could have been if Bolin had been 100% concentrated on the band.

A Bitter Taste - 60%

MEGANICK89, May 9th, 2012

It is very easy to believe that this album would be a failure. Arguably, the main cog of Deep Purple, Ritchie Blackmore left because of his unhappiness towards the more funky, blues based sound the band was beginning to develop on “Stormbringer.” The band was just about done after this happened, but vocalist David Coverdale and bassist Glenn Hughes wanted to push on and push on they did when they found guitarist Tommy Bolin to fill in Blackmore’s big shoes. Bolin’s style is more straightforward and has a funky edge to it than the classical leanings of Blackmore. Adding on to that, the cover art is very seventies. I’m sure some people thought it looked “happenin’” and “groovy”, but seeing the band’s faces plastered in a glass of wine creeps me out a bit.

It's evidently clear that Coverdale, Hughes, and Bolin had the biggest imprint on this album because it is a lot more bluesy and funky. Songs like “Lady Luck”, “I Need Love”, “Gettin’ Tighter” have the funky edge and lyrics trying to court the ladies. There is no “Child in Time” or the emotional outreach of “Soldier of Fortune” found on here. In all honesty, I would have reacted better to this album if it was a Whitesnake release rather than a Deep Purple record. It makes sense too because Ian Paice and Jon Lord would join Coverdale in Whitesnake after this.

Amidst all the mid-tempo rockers are some great tracks. The opener, “Comin’ Home”, has an upbeat tempo, driving keyboards and guitar, with an energetic performance by Coverdale. The true highlights occur with “This Time Around” and “Owed to G” as Lord is allowed to show his keyboard skill with an array of notes dancing as Hughes channels his inner Stevie Wonder and busts out an awesome vocal performance. It’s a perfect tune to go strolling through the city streets with. At least, that’s the images that go through my head while listening to it. Another stellar tune is “You Keep on Moving” with a cool bass line and another inspiring vocal performance by Hughes. The somber tone by Hughes and the keyboards work effectively and the middle part where the music picks up and Coverdale joins in makes for a memorable moment. Bolin closes with a great solo and it makes for a perfect song.

It’s unfortunate the songs did not become as adventurous as this as “Drifter” and “Dealer” meander in mediocrity and fail to conjure anything memorable. However, I have to give an honorable mention to “Love Child.” Besides the goofy title, the opening riff is very catchy and manages to hold my attention throughout the song.

“Come Taste the Band” ends up leaving the listener with a bitter taste. If the band had concentrated their efforts on creating more songs like “Comin” Home” and “This Time Around” it could have been truly special, but unfortunately it fails to live up to its potential. However, it is by no means a bad record. If you are going to purchase this, I highly recommend the 35th Anniversary Edition which features remixes by Glenn Hughes and two studio outtakes where you can hear a Bolin and Paice jam where Bolin wails on the guitar more than he did on the rest of the album and “Same in LA” is a neat keyboard driven rocker. You also get the story of how this lineup was formed, how the songs were put together, and what led to their breakup. Even though as a whole, the taste is sour, there are some fine sips inbetween.

nicksmetal.blogspot.com

Coverdale/Hughes Society Vol. 3: The Comma - 40%

Ritchie Black Iommi, April 14th, 2012

The Black Sheep of the Family, Ritchie Blackmore, dissapointed of the musical direction the band took and filled with remorse because of the rejection he recieved when he wanted to record some rock classics in Stormbringer, decided to quit the band he created, starting a beautiful episode known for every metalhead as "Rainbow".

Such a big vacancy, maybe the biggest vacancy in the history of heavy metal, was to be filled by the newcomer Tommy Bolin. This guy fitted perfectly into the standards of the mid-talented leaders of the band at that moment, Coverdale and Hughes: he had that funky touch and sounded more conventional than neo-classical and intrincate Blackmore. Being that said and with the influence of Jon Lord and Paicey reduced to nice accesories, Come Taste the Band meets light and gives the finest NON DEEP PURPLE album ever.

Yeah, that is. And for the worst, well, almost every song sounds exactly the same. Starting from "Comin Home", we believe we are entering a totally new universe in DP. Feeling something that, in a way, sounds familiar because of the previous album but with a different touch and feeling. But at the next song we listen almost the same sound, the same idea, the same style of playing, the same funky groovy AOR oriented sound. The basic question is: ¿can something good be expected from a couple of guys who never quited or never evolved from the short handed funky sounds. If you add a guitar player who does exactly the same thing you are used to do, well, you can't expect new things. Afer listening Stormbringer, all of this sounds like a cheaper and lighter version of it. One after the other, "Lady Luck", "Gettin' Tighter", "Dealer", "I Need Love", "Drifter", "Love Child" and "This Time Around" are, maybe faster, maybe slower, maybe funkier, maybe bluesier, the same thing in one way or the other. There are no blast beats by Paicey, there are no atmospheric keyboard soloing, the bass lines are mediocre and usual, there are no magic guitar solos nor blasting riffs (is it possible to match Ritchie's standards?). And the vocals? Well, like Burn but 75% lighter.

Listening to this is like to listen an album by Foghat, early Kansas or even Billy Idol to some extent. Is like a more straightforward version of Trapeze or a non-cheesy and a bit funkier style of Whitesnake. But, even more than the previous album, this is not DP. In Stormbringer there were some high points, a little bit of Purple spirit. Here, everything is as dull as the song you've heard before the next one. The only tracks which are in the palette of Deep Purple's greatness are "You Keep on Moving" and "Owed to G". The latter one is a nice instrumental, ouvre and gràce de Jon Lord. The first one is, maybe, the only remarkable song made by this mediocre mark. The keyboarding and the final solo (the finest ever done by Bolin) are the only salvation spots for this entire album.

After a relative success (not so big comparing with the previous albums) of this release, the major heavy metal band of the seventies disbanded. Coverdale took Paice and Lord for Whitesnake while Hughes and Bolin went on different pathways.

David Coverdale had a little bit of success with his girly glamish pop rock sometimes hard band, while Hughes attempted a weak passage through BLACK SABBATH (Yikes!, Iommi, what were you thinking? Ah, yeah, a solo album rotten by discographic companies). And the worst part was for Bolin. He tried to replace Blackmore in DP's guitar and he died. Destiny knows why this kind of things happens...

Deep Purple, as I said above, the greatest heavy metal act in the early seventies entered in a profound comma after this album. Fortunately, the gods smiled us all and Mark II returned for bringing the goods once again in Perfect Strangers. But that's another tale.

Come and taste an underrated classic... - 94%

Pegasus_wings, November 26th, 2004

Many things had changed since the heydays of “In rock” and “Machine head”. Ian Gillan with his distinctive screaming voice had left the group, the legendary pioneer bassist, songwriter and producer Roger Glover had gone and Ritchie Blackmore was the last victim of changes, leaving Deep Purple disappointed by the band’s new music direction and his little involment in the previous album “Stormbringer”. Bluesy David Coverdale was the new main vocalist and funky Glenn Hughes was the new bassist, sharing also the vocals with David. Tommy Bolin was also the new guitarist of the group (and a new great vocalist too!) revitalising the band.

The differences between MK IV and the previous incarnations of Deep Purple are apparent. David, Glenn and Tommy were not so dynamic and they could not scream as well as I. Gillan, but few groups had the privilege of three top-class gifted singers sharing the vocals (the quality of these guys has also been proved by other projects such as “Trapeze”, “Whitesnake”, “Tommy Bolin band” etc.). They were softer, but that does not mean that they were worse than Gillan (some people also believe that they were better!!). Additionally, the new guitarist was not so inventive, progressive, capable riff maker and aggressive as Ritchie, but he was more virtouoso, vivid, spontaneous and fresh than his predecessor. Ritchie seemed to use his guitar as a powerful gun, while Tommy made love with it! Nobody was better than the other, they were just different. The group had also been freed by the rival between Ritchie and the “newcomers” (Glenn and David), who wanted to lead the group, so they could express more easily their preferences, creating an exciting mixture of blues, funk and hard-rock. Finally, Ian Paice and Jon Lord (always precious additions) had abandoned any claim of leadership, leaving the others to show their creativity.

In fact, that’s a completely different band than that of the previous years, sharing only the name and the glorious past. However, they deserved to continue as Deep Purple and they added another one legendary piece to the history of the band with “Come taste the band”, an ignored (for its quality) album, which is not so heavy as “Machine head” for example, but it’s, along with “Stormbringer”, the most melodic and emotional too.

“Comin’ home’ (9/10) is a vivid, fast song, with Tommy’s distinctive guitar and David’s bluesy voice being the landmarks of the track. It’s not so heavy as other openers of the group (“Highway star”, “Burn” etc.), but it’s also impressive. “Lady luck” (9/10) is another vivid song, catchy at its structure and another chance for David and Tommy to show their skills. “Gettin’ tigher” (8,5/10) is the most funky track of the album, with the apparent involvement of Glenn in the songwriting and performance too. “Dealer” (8/10), “I need love” (8/10), “Drifter” (8/10) and “Love child” (8,5/10) are the result of David’s characteristic lyrics and melodies (these songs remind me of “Whitesnake” sometimes) and the magnificent solo work of Tommy. “This time around/Owed to G” (10/10) is a melodic track divided to two parts. In the first one, the three singers share the vocals one by one, while Jon Lord backs them perfectly playing all the instruments (!). The second part breaks the serenity, with an impressive crescendo of Tommy and Jon, full of emotion and dynamic solos. Finally, the album ends with the best closer in their entire history. “You keep on moving” (10/10) is a melodic, slow song in which the long eerie vocals of the three singers, the poetic lyrics and the killing solos of Tommy really rule.

CONCLUSION: Caution! I adore that album, because I am also a hard-rock fan (not only metalhead). But when I say that it’s one of the best quality albums of Deep Purple, I really mean it. So, don’t expect to hear a heavy metal anthem such as “In rock”, but only good rock music.