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One last quality banger - 81%

Gabometal86, April 9th, 2005

BARON ROJO – EN UN LUGAR DE LA MARCHA.

By the year of 1985 Baron Rojo was held in a really high status and they even played on such metal festivals as The Reading Festival with Gary Moore, iron Maiden, etc and their were a top-selling band, all their previous albums have either gone gold or platinum. Sadly, this was their last album that would enjoy those privileges, Baron Rojo had lyrics about social injustice and that’s what attracted many people to their in the early 80´s. lyrics like “Resistiré” and “El Pobre” were a strong fulcrum point for this band, the youthful and rebellious mass felt identified with those lyrics, and now in “En Un Lugar De La Marcha” those kind of lyrics were missing. On the musicianship, this album has some of Baron Rojo´s highest peaks; lots of nifty speed metal moments and overt riffing. The band wanted a change of sound, so they mixed and produced the album themselves and believe me that this is their better sounding album up to that point.

This album made a few eardrums burst with songs like “Chicos Del Rock” which is a nice mid-paced tune with an anthem-like and ubber catchy chorus and showing hints of Thin Lizzy and Ted Nugent on that blazing hard rock riff but featuring really cheesy and childish lyrics about heavy rock. “Cuerdas De Acero” is a quality and melodic speed metal number featuring a semi-godly guitar work with lots of harmony leads a la Judas Priest and lyrics dedicated to the guitar and its steel strings. “Hijos De Caín” is a nice heavy ballad that starts with a tidy drum intro and it features a really lengthy and shredding solo on the break. The lyrics tell the biblical story of Cain and Abel. “Tras De Tí” is a kinda rock boogie with a southern feel to it.

It’s not bad to have some lyrics dealing with the fact that you like heavy rock and all that kind of issues, but when half of your lyrics are similar to Twisted Sister’s “I Wanna Rock”, then you are somehow screwed and that’s what’s happening here. Still, those silly and cheesy lyrics really don’t harm the album but I would have rated this one higher if the lyrics were more or less similar to the ones on their previous releases. Anyhow, the musicianship is as tight as ever and that makes this a worthy album.

Conclusion: The De Castro brothers did it again; they have delivered another enjoyable slab of heavy metal with equal catchiness and speed.