Register Forgot login?

© 2002-2014
Encyclopaedia Metallum

Best viewed
without Internet Explorer,
in 1280 x 960 resolution
or higher.

But decorate the children of their own ego's way - 72%

TheBlash, June 24th, 2013

Avantasia, for me, has been quite a love/hate relationship. I really enjoyed the Metal Opera, Part I. Part II was more or less an abortion. The Scarecrow revolutionized my perspective on metal music. The Wicked Symphony was one of my favourite albums. But then I started paying attention to the lyrics.

This is yet another great line-up. I've said it before and I'll say it again: Tobias Sammet is the weakest link in Avantasia. He's a good singer. That is to say, he has great vocal technique. His voice is a little annoying and his vibrato is a little absurd (though perfect at times, see chorus of Savior in the Clockwork). However, surrounding himself with great singers such as Jørn Lande, Russel Allen and Bob Catley really makes him fall into the shadows. Sascha Paeth is an outstanding guitarist, and one of my all time favourites. The drumming doesn't amaze me, but I don't have much of an ear for drums. The bass is hardly in the mix at all, but hey, that's power metal.

The songwriting here is actually pretty great. The use of the orchestra is incredibly generic, but again, that's power metal. The soundscaping is also nice, and the production is astounding. But. These lyrics. Are. Terrible. I feel like Tobias Sammet got a hat (maybe the one he wore and lost during the Flying Opera), and in that hat put in a bunch of metal sounding stuff (dead of night, primal screams, etc) mixed with ones that fit into a clockwork aesthetic (I don't find examples necessary here), a few big words that a fair amount of native English speakers might not know (epiphanic, Phantasmagoria) and perhaps a few helping verbs and article adjectives (the, are, etc), and pulled them out and random just hoping to form rhyme schemes. Either that, or he resorted to what he did so blatantly in the Wicked Trilogy and just pieced together some enigmatic crap and try to pass it off as artistic. But it's not. It's empty.

Normally, I can let substandard lyrics pass off without too much issue. I mean, words by themselves are not music, and I call myself a musician, not a poet. And because of that I must admit the music here is quite good. But I can't let this crime against English writing go unpunished. I'll leave you off with a few of my favourites (not including the piece of crap with which I named this review):

"If you don't follow your self- preservation drive
They'll crucify the one who won't affiliate"

"Welcome to the aftermath of the incidence
That made the tower fall"

"My heart beat quickens I behold the god-machine
I can't help but write history"

What. The. Hell.

And this of course is without even including "Sleepwalking" into my critique. I'm being generous in that aspect. Don't get me wrong, a good ballad can be absolutely great ("The Maiden and the Minstrel Knight," "Always Will Be," etc.) but this isn't even worth the mention. I instantly regret bringing it up. Cheers, and happy listening.

How the mighty have fallen... - 30%

Deathaura, June 24th, 2013

Avantasia is the reason I weep for the modern world of power metal.

Put me in the camp of people who have been underwhelmed since Avantasia's return about 5-6 years ago with The Scarecrow. Since then, they've released 3 more albums, completed a second full story arc, and have started a third with "The Mystery of Time." The Mystery of Time does little to break the mold of Avantasia. Aside from a roster of musicians that is heavily geared towards rock musicians of Tobias's preference (having Uriah Heep's drummer, a fair bit of Bob Catley again, and Tobi's jagged voice, to start), there is absolutely nothing on this album you have not heard before. More on that in a minute.

The Mystery of Time was recorded with a full orchestra, but months later I'm still scratching my head wondering why Tobias wasted everyone's time, money, and energy putting an orchestra in the background of this bloated hour of music. There are songs without any orchestra (Invoke the Machine) and songs that rely heavily on them (album opener Spectres). Most of the time, the orchestra is barely audible and adds very little to the song. Spectres has a nice balance of rock band and orchestra, but after that it's kind of downhill. There's no consistency to this album - the album shifts moods at a jarring, uneasy rate. Black Orchid is a dreary, forgettable, annoying song that is twice as long as it should be. It then leads into the soaring Where Clock Hands Freeze with Michael Kiske, which is the high point of the album. From there, it immediately switches to a contemporary pop number. The switch is just too jarring and the songs seem to have nothing to do with one another. For an alleged concept album, this is a bad thing.

That's just the beginning of my problems with this album. All of the vocalists, with the exception of Michael Kiske, sound completely over-the-hill. The performances on this album sound pathetic, as if they were recorded once and everyone went, "That's fine!" Throughout the entire album we are forced to listen to Tobias's voice, which, over the last several years, has become little more than a terribly nasally, jagged shout/moan/exaggerated syllable that bears striking resemblance to a pissed off housecat. On The Watchmaker's Dream you can hear the guest vocalist actually crack his voice a couple times as the song goes on. Excluding Michael Kiske, the album really does sound like an album of aging men attempting to do something relevant but kind of missing the mark. On Where Clock Hands Freeze, two bars before the first chorus, Michael Kiske sustains a note and then unleashes a power metal scream that leaves you wondering how the hell this guy has kept his voice in such remarkable condition. The next time this bridge comes in, Tobias is on vocals, and just shouts the last note. Instead of leading into the chorus with some lyrics or his signature whiny scream, we're simply treated to the most underwhelming drum fill/solo (two bars' worth) that I have ever heard. For fuck's sake, it's pathetic. Jorn Lande's absence is really felt on this release.

This whole album reeks of Meat Loaf and Jim Steinman. There are hardly any metal moments on this album, but the few there are actually do sound good. Tobias can still write a mean, MEAN hook (Where Clock Hands Freeze, Savior In The Clockwork) but the reality is there are so many uninspired, unnecessarily drawn out musical ideas that it sound stale. It gets tiresome extremely fast. Every song has at least a little bit of filler, except maybe Where Clock Hands Freeze, which is more reminiscent of The Scarecrow. The *entire* title track is an exercise in exhausting, overblown rock concepts, just like everything Meat Loaf has done since Bat Out Of Hell 2. I actually looked through the booklet waiting to see Steinman

This version of Avantasia is why I weep for power metal. Tobias Sammet is arguably the most prolific artist to have graced the genre at this point and it's easy to make the case that he is one of the most important figures in it. However, the music has become little more than a bland, half-assed rock opera utilizing Tobias's idols to flesh out the musical lines Tobias is no longer capable of singing. There are very few songs that matter, and most of them are too long (Savior In The Clockwork, The Great Mystery, the latter of which I have never been patient enough to finish more than once), some are too boring (What's Left of Me), some are a combination of the two (Black Orchid). Dweller In A Dream sounds *exactly* like Rocket Ride-era Edguy, and Where Clock Hands Freeze, while a gorgeous, catchy song, brings *nothing* new to the table. Not one song on this album makes me think, "Yeah, that's the Avantasia I know and love." Even the mediocre Angel of Babylon's first few tracks are pretty solid.

Oh, and by the way, I'm not a guitarist so I don't know if there's a term for this, but tell Sascha Paeth to knock it the fuck off with his style of playing. It ruins everything I love about Avantasia. It ruined Scales of Justice on The Wicked Symphony (about halfway through when it stops kicking ass), it comes back in spades throughout this album (especially the second verse of Sleepwalking), and if I hear it rehashed through another five shitty songs two years from now I may just throw all of my Avantasia albums off the freeway.

Check out Spectres and Where Clock Hands Freeze, and if you like those, give the album a shot, but coming from a once-huge Avantasia fan, I'm sorely disappointed with this. The only reason I purchased it was because I came across it by chance at a Best Buy for $10.

Avantasia - The mystery of time - 70%

Radagast, May 3rd, 2013

Let’s just get one thing out of the way right now. “Sleepwalking” is an embarrassment. It’s just awful. It’s another abject ‘soft verse/booming chorus’ pop ballad that stands out a mile from the rest of the CD around it. It’s no more or less than an empty, lifeless, cynical attempt to sell Avantasia to a wider market than their usual demographic; I know it, you know it and, moreover, Toby knows it.

With that hideousness out of the way, Avantasia’s 6th full-length CD is another patchy affair that wobbles between the sublime and the not-so-sublime with regularity. Very much in the mould of the 3 previous Sascha Paeth-produced CDs, it doesn’t offer too many surprises but, the aforementioned defilement aside, is a bit more consistent and restrained than the sprawling ‘The wicked symphony’/’Angel of Babylon’ double offering.

Thankfully the Jim Steinman-inspired pomp rock that swamped much of ‘Angel of Babylon’ has been reigned in a bit, and at least 4 of the 9 credible songs on here should have those pining for a the power metal Avantasia of old feeling all nostalgic. The rest of the songs tend more towards a more bombastic symphonic approach that in some cases succeeds and in others is found somewhat lacking.

As this would suggest, ‘The mystery of time’ proves to be very much a CD of contrasts – for all the more reduced roster of guest musicians, it also features a full orchestra on some songs, and while the power metal quotient is probably slightly higher than it has been in a while, 3 of the 6 male guest vocalist fall into the “brash and ballsy” category.

Michael Kiske and Bob Catley of course make their customary appearances, but Joe Lynn Turner is the most prominent guest presence on the CD, with Saxon’s Biff Byford also cropping up from time to time and Ronnie Atkins of Pretty Maids making an excellent single contribution on the rollicking “Invoke the machine”. This is one of the more power metal-oriented songs, and while it is maybe a little cluttered, it’s also plenty energetic and features some cracking lead guitar from Oliver Hartmann.

“Where clock hands freeze” is another of the pounding double-bass numbers and features Kiske’s most prominent performance, with Sammet even managing to coax a bit of the old high-register stuff out of him, which is simply a joy to behold. For all the frustrations Sammet has inflicted over the last few Edguy and Avantasia CDs, I suppose he will always be due a debt of gratitude for gradually easing Kiske back where he belongs.

Getting back to those bass pedals, possibly the most pleasantly surprising announcement in the run-up to ‘The mystery of time’ being released was the news that Uriah Heep’s Russell Gilbrook had been snagged as the drummer. He’s a stunningly energetic performer who has helped breathe new life into his parent band, and while Sammet and Paeth maybe don’t quite get the best out of him, he still puts in a sprightly and varied set of performance on the faster stuff.

It can be no coincidence that the 2nd track, and the first to feature Gilbrook prominently is “The watchmaker’s dream” which is shrouded in some delightfully old-fashioned organ noodling from Miro Rodenberg which is reminiscent of the Heep at their most exhuberant.

The longer, orchestral songs don’t quite have the same impactas the nippier tracks, and are often left feeling quite bitty. By their very nature less comact, they each feature some inspired sections typically being undercut by more tiresome fits of chugging guitars, most notably on the lacklustre opener “Spectres” and the over-long “Black orchid”.

Sandwiched in amongst this battle for dominance between the 2 main styles is the tender, and yes, rather cheesy ballad “What’s left of me”. A little predictable to be sure, it nonetheless is a stand-out on the CD, thanks in no small part to the soulful vocals of Eric Martin in his single appearance. While some of the longer songs tend to flounder around a few different approaches without really making a connection, this song manages to hit an emotional bullseye despite – or perhaps, because of – its more restrained arrangement.

The difference between the emotions that followed the announcement of ‘The scarecrow’ being released with that of ‘The mystery of time’ couldn’t really be more marked, with the former triggering a wave of elation and the latter a quick “oh that’s cool, I guess”. It’s pretty safe to say that the mystique of the project has been diminished somewhat with each passing release, and while the shivering feeling of revulsion that followed that first listen to “Lost in space” back in 2007 has never really gone away, if you’re prepared to swallow the tasteless business-minded single and focus on the rest of the CD, ‘The mystery of time’ will prove to be generally quite satisfying.

(Originally written for http://www.metalcdratings.com/)

Time to run - tell me for how long! - 87%

Empyreal, April 1st, 2013

Tobias Sammet is something of an institution nowadays, as he produces quality material at an alarmingly fast rate and a lot of people resent him for being so, well, institutionalized. But I have been a fan more and more over the years as he’s evolved from imperfect, if important, power metal into quite a wonderful mix of commercial melodic metal with shiny, glistening 80s-style hard rock and whatever other influences he’s wanted to pull in. It’s not about the musical style he plays for me, but more just the tremendous effect his music has had on me – I love the grandiosity of the big epics, the emotional appeal of the softer songs and the quirky creativity of the ones in-between. It’s just great, and I’ve expounded on it enough in my other reviews. This is The Mystery of Time, his latest venture into Avantasia-country, and is it good? Well, yes, it is, but I still have things to say about it in plenty.

This is a very ambitious work, especially for Sammet, who mostly just sticks to substance over style most of the time, if you will. The Mystery of Time still has all the hallmarks of the recent Avantasia albums – the catchy choruses, the hard-rock-twinged guitar playing and the manic diversity – but there is precious little kitsch about it now, very little of the Bon Jovi-isms and 80s callbacks. This is a very dramatic, serious work that relies more on its atmosphere to tell a story, rather than repetition of its choruses…really, these songs repeat their choruses precious little compared to previous efforts, and the heightened complexity is very refreshing here.

The main change is the full, real orchestra he’s recruited for this. On tracks like shining opener “Spectres” and the show-stopping “Savior in the Clockwork” (the most dark and dramatic track he’s ever written) we see Sammet really playing around with the symphonic aspect of the band and crafting a much deeper, fuller integration of the symphonics with the metal than he’s ever had before – or that most bands ever get. Most bands just sort of lay over the orchestration with cheesy power chords and a big chorus – not this album. Here we get a very layered sound where the rocking choruses and hard-hitting riffs are done up with songwriting befitting of a classical symphony, moving and flowing as emotional peaks and valleys, with some of the best integration of classical with metal/rock I’ve ever heard.

Okay, okay, I’m sure the purists and the musical theory buffs will rebuke that in a second – I’m not professing to be a scholar on classical music and I won’t bother making any comparisons to actual movements and symphonies. But The Mystery of Time is closer to the “symphonic metal” genre, in a literal sense, than many other bands commonly touted as such, or at the very least, approaches things in a novel way. It’s not on every song, but the more detailed, longer pieces showcase this really interesting, dark sound that alchemically blends the two genres together in ways that power metal isn’t really known for. And really, when I think about the name Avantasia, this whimsical, fantastical sound is really what I think most appropriately sums it up, better than any of the band’s previous output ever did. The long songs like “Savior in the Clockwork” and “The Great Mystery” just showcase this incredibly narrative, involving and opaque style that really eschews a lot of the stereotypes of the rock music genre in favor of a much more flowing, classically inspired songwriting style. It’s very different for Sammet and really makes me look forward to whatever he’ll come up with next.

Now, the problem with this was a bit hard to spot at first, but I think I finally know what it is. It’s what I just said – not every track utilizes the symphonic sound. A lot of these songs are more traditional rock-based ones, like Tobias usually does, even if they are markedly less “fun” sounding than he’s usually known for. I didn’t expect him to dive head-on into his new experiments without some forays back to the familiar territory, but it would help if some of these songs were better. “The Watchmaker’s Dream” is about as close to a definition of filler as we’re likely to get, and it’s not bad or anything but certainly isn’t the peak of Sammet’s abilities – it just sounds so ordinary. “Dweller in a Dream,” likewise, is pretty fun, but it just feels so short and underdeveloped in the long run.

Fortunately, a lot of the rest of this is really good. Witness the pounding, ghastly stomp of “Black Orchid,” or the kinetic power of “Invoke the Machine.” And the ballads are just great, with “What’s Left of Me” boasting an impressive performance from Mr. Big vocalist Eric Martin, and a very emotive hook. “Sleepwalking,” the album’s pop single, might even be one of the album’s most affecting moments…just a wonderful, beautiful little song, and the best pop song Sammet has done yet. And we get some good old school power metal on “Where Clock Hands Freeze,” which is the token bone thrown to the Metal Opera crowd – it’s kick ass, however.

The Mystery of Time will be a disappointment to those who were expecting the easy gratification of 2010’s magnificent double-album set, and it might be more friendly to those who wanted more of the epic storytelling style of the Metal Opera albums, but really this is its own new beast. More involved and cleverly written than previous albums, this one requires some time and intense listening to really understand, but it’s well worth it. This is a really intelligent and well-written album of bombastic, symphonic rock music, and Sammet’s ambition is appreciated even when the album isn’t always hitting its all-time highs. I think I might score this one even higher, though, once we get the second part of its story in a few years’ time – then I think its wide scope will be able to be truly appreciated. It’s all part of the mystery behind as of now…lost between the time.

One of the best releases by Avantasia! - 80%

aplws, April 1st, 2013

"The Mystery Of Time" is the sixth studio album of the rock opera project, Avantasia. The project offers a very good new album that rivals some of its past achievements. The use of a real orchestra proves to be a welcome addition, creating a bigger and more captivating sound than before.

The cast of musicians includes Tobias Sammet on bass and lead vocals, Sascha Paeth (ex-Heaven's Gate) on guitars, and Russell Gilbrook (Uriah Heep) on drums, and guest guitarists Bruce Kulick (ex-Kiss, ex-Meat Loaf), Oliver Hartmann (ex-At Vance), and Arjen Anthony Lucassen (Ayreon). The Mystery Of Time is also the first Avantasia album to feature the German film orchestra Babelsberg.

The list of guest vocalists is expectantly impressive and includes Joe Lynn Turner (ex-Rainbow, ex-Yngwie Malmsteen), Biff Byford (Saxon), Michael Kiske (ex-Helloween, Unisonic), Ronnie Atkins (Pretty Maids), Eric Martin (Mr. Big), Bob Catley (Magnum), and Cloudy Yang.

The album offers a variety of hard rock, symphonic rock, power metal, and pop rock. The overall sound doesn’t differ a lot from The Wicked Trilogy releases, but the orchestra surely makes things more interesting and the vocals are more evenly distributed.

There are many highlights among the songs and only two of them sound rather weak or filler-like. The major highlights include the longest song on offer entitled “Savior In The Clockwork”. A varied hard rock track, with doses of power metal, containing several tempo changes, great vocals by Biff Byford and Tobias Sammet, a big chorus, short performances by Joe Lynn Turner and Michael Kiske and very good guitar work by Bruce Kulick. “Where Clock Hands Freeze” is another highlight. It is the mandatory Michael Kiske-fronted power metal track, featuring Kiske’s best performance on an Avantasia song and the best chorus on the album. “Black Orchid” is the darkest song on offer and features a duet between Byford and Sammet, another great chorus, prominent orchestral passages and a captivating atmosphere. The fourth major highlight is the second longest track and perfect album closer, “The Great Mystery”. A big ballad-type of song with several tempo changes that combine influences from Magnum to The Trans-Siberian Orchestra. Bob Catley and Sammet do a very good job on the vocals, the chorus is memorable, and the orchestra shines as well.

Besides the album’s strong points, there are also some flaws. The biggest flaw is the absence of longer and more technical guitar solos and the low mix of the guitars (in parts). At some instances it seems that the guitars are not very important and that all the weight is placed on the orchestra and the vocals. Another disadvantage is the weak pop ballad “Sleepwalking”, which ruins the flow of the album and the mediocre hard rocker, “The Watchmaker’s Dream”, which features an unimpressive Joe Lynn Turner and a weak chorus. The final minor flaw is the use of certain tempo changes, on some songs, that don’t necessarily work for the best.

In conclusion, "The Mystery Of Time" is a great rock opera release. It flows better than the previous three Avantasia albums and includes only a small number of weak songs. Most guest vocalists do a great job and their roles are overall more prominent compared to past releases. The orchestra is a great addition and works well, as it is used wisely. Personally, I view the new installment as one of the stronger Avantasia albums, which surpasses Angel Of Babylon, The Metal Opera Part II and probably even The Scarecrow.

(Originally written for http://www.amazon.co.uk website)

Mr. Sammet starts getting serious again...mostly. - 70%

hells_unicorn, April 1st, 2013

It's a foregone conclusion that regardless of the outcry from numerous older fans of butchering a once powerful sound, Tobias Sammet will continue to insist that he has remained consistent in his approach from day one regarding his work with Edguy and Avantasia. Sure, there will be an admission of an evolution of sound guided by the spirit of the time in question, but at no point will a mea culpa regarding a drop in quality be acknowledged from the same guy that went from the brilliance of "Mandrake" to the over-the-top buffoonery of "Age Of The Joker". But while the jury is still out on whether Edguy will put out another album that's worth the average power metal enthusiast's time, some positive reforms are going on regarding the sound of Avantasia of late, thought they seem to be of the painfully gradual variety, as Toby seems hellbent on clinging to a number of the same errors that took this projects post-2002 material into the toilet.

"The Mystery Of Time" recovers lost ground primarily in the songwriting department, as a rekindled interest in the olden fantasy subjects has been given its proper prominence again, and along with it a more metallic edge. It's particularly noticeable on the faster numbers such as "Where Clock Hands Freeze" and "Invoke The Machine", the former of which features a brilliant vocal display out of Michael Kiske that takes one back to the high flying majesty heard on his work with this project early on. Both of these songs definitely bring in a familiar element of catchy hooks, but largely manages to avoid the muddied mess of rock guitar noise heard on the last couple albums. Similarly, when things go longer there is a bit less meandering from one section to the next, though nothing on here reaches the same pinnacle accomplished on "Seven Angels". Perhaps the closest contender to holding a candle to the earlier days in the down tempo department is the album's opener "Spectres", which does remind a bit of the closing song off the first "Metal Opera" album in "The Tower", particularly in its usage of brief piano ballad sections to counterbalance an otherwise heavier anthem.

Naturally, a gradual move towards a better sound of this sort is mired by some past pitfalls, and a few really blatant stains on an obviously tainted recent history have yet to be washed off. The worst offender is the limp-wrist pop ballad "Sleepwalking", which is 100% unfathomable sonic rubbish that will offend any ear that is uncomfortable with Matchbox 20 meets Coldplay drivel being on a metal album. Things take a slight step up on the second fit of balladry "What's Left Of Me", which comes off more as a 3rd rate homage to Meatloaf (a common well for Tobias to draw from, and one that he has done far better with in the past). What is perhaps most annoying about these songs is that they are utterly generic and unmemorable, and apart from the superior vocal abilities of the likes of Billy Byford, Joe Lynn Turner and Bob Catley, is indistinguishable from the ever expanding pile of rubbish populating rock radio of late. But one thing that is almost as annoying is the garbled, mushy guitar tone that Sascha Paeth keeps using to punish the ears of those who want to hear an actual power metal album. In the early 2000s, Henjo Richter brought a punchy, clear, speed metal-like character to what would otherwise have been an extremely formulaic latter day Helloween homage, and his presence probably would have helped a number of these songs quite a bit.

There seems to be a growing consensus that "The Mystery Of Time" is a departure from the so-called "The Scarecrow" sound, which also hints at a return to the good old days. I agree with this sentiment in part, as Toby appears to be looking for something musically, but has stopped a bit short of actually finding it and taking ownership of it yet again. Older guard fans of this band back in the days when Stratovarius, Helloween and Gamma Ray were having a more direct influence on Sammet's sound are advised to approach this album with a degree of caution and with a bit less cash in hand. In fact, those going the digital route are encouraged to skip over purchasing the ballads on here and pretending that they don't exist. Better yet, while at it, one would do well to pretend that this project hadn't put out anything since 2002 and keep hoping that this project will, in time, do the same.

Later submitted to (www.metal-observer.com) on April 3, 2013.

So close to being a masterpiece... - 85%

Immortally_Insane, March 31st, 2013

The Mystery of Time features yet another all star lineup. Outside of Sammet's constant presence, the album features Michael Kiske, Biff Byford, Arjen Anthony Lucassen, and Joe Lynn Turner just to name a few. There are many new vocal presences in the album, different from the usual heard in Avantasia's past, and it really helps create a refreshing and new sound to the project. As usual however, the production and orchestrations, instrumentation, choir presence, and vocal layering are absolutely spot on. Upon first listen to the album however, I wasn't completely sold. I felt like a few of the songs were hollow and emotionless. Unlike my favorite albums, The Metal Opera I and II and The Scarecrow, I didn't get pulled into the record right away. Listening to the album four or five times however, I saw the album for what it truly is, a quite flawlessly executed rock opera.

The first track on “Spectres” begins slowly and doesn't feel like a proper way to kick off an album. The drum work is more fitting of a faster tempo thrash song than the mellow presence of the music throughout the verses. However, as soon as the chorus kicked in I felt that rush of joy and sheer happiness typically expected when listening to Avantasia. Tracks like “The Watchmakers Dream” and “Black Orchid” manage to bring back all of that which I love from Sammet, strong, soaring choruses and beautiful guitar work from Arjen Lucassen. Biff Byford joins in, bringing with him that raw, true heavy metal roughness that is found in Saxon, and has an amazing way of rounding out and complementing Sammet's vocals. “Where Clock Hands Freeze” and “Dweller in a Dream” feature the ever amazing, and never aging voice of Michael Kiske himself. Kiske brings such a crisp, soaring presence to a song that is simply unmatched.

The ballad-like “Sleepwalking” features the familiar female vocal accompaniment of Cloudy Yang. Her vocal presence brings an ever pop-like sound to the album, but it is a beautiful song nonetheless. Two 10 minute long songs “Savior in the Clockwork” and “The Great Mystery” truly make this album strong and epic, while tracks like “Invoke the Machine” bring a serious heavy metal vibe, featuring Ronnie Atkins of Pretty Maids. This is easily one of the best tracks on the album, blending that epic power metal sound of choruses and keyboards with perfect and heavy thrashing elements.

The album as a whole manages to, as usual, feature not only the musical artistry of Tobias Sammet, but also brings together names from all over the rock and metal genre to show off each individual's talent. Personally, I am so happy that Avantasia is still alive and kicking. The Mystery of Time is absolutely an album to be proud of, and for any fans of power metal, Edguy, or previous Avantasia albums, there are absolutely elements of all three in these songs for you to enjoy. Here's to another great album thanks to Tobias Sammet, cheers!

[Originally written for Metalwani.com, TheMetalReview.com, & Metalholic.com]