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Architecture of Lust - 85%

todesengel89, May 16th, 2012

Since the release of the band's debut full length album in 1999, Italy's Antropofagus has gone rather quiet, and this year sees them breaking the silence with a brand new album in more than 12 years, entitled Architecture of Lust, featuring an almost completely new lineup, other than original guitarist and founder, Meatgrinder.

There are usually two main possibilities when a band comes back from such a long hiatus, with an album that far exceeds expectations or one that usually ends up disappointing older fans of the band, denting the band's legacy. Fortunately then, Architecture of Lust is my first contact with the band and there are no comparisons that can be done with the band's 13-year old album. The band, Architecture of Lust presents a more technical side of the band's songwriting all the while retaining the old school brutal touch in the music, and this is evident right from the relentless blasting that hits the listener from the start of the title track Architecture of Lust.

Musically, the band is somewhat reminiscent to bands like their New York counterparts Suffocation, especially so with the riffing patterns of guitarist Meatgrinder and the throaty growls of Tya, though songs like Sadistic Illusive Puritanism reminds the listener somewhat of later Bloodbath material. The element of brutality is further upped by the ruthless drumming of Davide, who punishes the drums relentlessly. His stamina is also impressive, going at full speed throughout the album and making them blast beats sound like child's play to him. Meatgrinder also proves that the years of Antropofagus' dormancy hasn't caused his skills to rust, with the complex riffs that he come up with, often punctuated by equally technical wankery in the middle of these riffs such as on Sanguinis Bestiae Solium, constantly throwing listeners nice surprises. The "real" lead guitar parts or solos though are often contrary to the complex and chaotic style and provides some sense of melody, and this gives a nice contrast to the overall feel of the album. Unfortunately though, the bass of Jacopo tended to be buried in the mix, and though it provides the low end growl that sometimes are audible, it would have been nice to hear his presence more as well.

The production quality of the album as well, is rather clean and nicely done, and allowing the guitars and drums to really have a strong presence was definitely enjoyable for the most part, giving Architecture of Lust an extremely powerful sound. The fact that most of the songs do not drag on for too long also helps to ensure that songs do not lose their impact, hitting the guts of the listener quickly and effectively.

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