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The single from the low point - 67%

Napero, November 22nd, 2009

Day of Your Beliefs, together with Evil Inside, holds the questionable honour of being the single off the worst album of Amorphis, Far from the Sun. While the single cannot be blamed for the poor performance of the album, it shares the same musical foundations. The single could therefore be compared to a child of a redneck family with a century and a half of inbreeding behind it: the starting points and the first impressions are not the best possible ones, and the expectations of outside observers are not anything ballistic.

The first and second tracks, two different versions of the title track, confirm the suspicions to a degree. The song is monotonous, too slow for the melody, and Koskinen's vocal performance certainly doesn't do the track justice. At this point of Amorphis' career Koskinen couldn't cope with the developments and requirements of the band's sound, the developments that, three years later, were to lead to Eclipse and the two almost equally good follow-up albums. While the track lags its feet and somehow sounds like swimming in tar, the guitars already sign the familiar, trademark Amorphis song that found its inception already on Tuonela and took seven long years and a new vocalist to bear its sweet, sweet fruits.

This is not meant to downplay Koskinen's value. He has done some pretty damn good stuff, but it's obvious that Amorphis was the wrong band for him at this point. Interestingly, Ajattara had already released its first album by the time the single came out, and Koskinen's departure was a logical continuation of the developments. At that point, many fans and metalheads thought for a couple of years that Amorphis was dead, but the phoenix was to rise from the ashes to a new life in 2006.

The second track on the single, "Darkrooms", is again one of the tracks that can't be found on the full-length, as has been usual on Amorphis' singles. And while the other singles have held some kind of curiosities or tracks that would not have fit the atmosphere of their respective full-lengths, this time the extra track beats the title track qualitywise with ease. The faster song allows Koskinen the kind of pace his vocal style needs, and somehow bears mre resemblance to the stuff later found on Eclipse. It simply works much better as a song and as a group effort. It's a sure sign of trouble if the B-side of the first single off an album, the one track that didn't make it onto the full-length, is better than the title track. That's exactly what happened here.

This single has, in retrospect, terribly challenging origins, but it doesn't completely fail. It's neither irritating nor enchanting, but simply a lukewarm experience. It won't get many spins in most people's players, but if an inbred family's kid makes it to become a beat cop, I guess it's a good achievement; nobody could seriously expect him to turn into a rocket engineer, right?