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Varth
Metal newbie

Joined: Fri Jul 06, 2012 8:18 pm
Posts: 117
Location: United States
PostPosted: Sun Aug 25, 2013 9:22 pm 
 

The first three Dune books are all a buildup to God Emperor of Dune which is completely off the wall and great as hell. I haven't read it in 10 years so I think I'm going to do that again. After the third book all the sequels take place thousands of years after the last, it gets pretty awesome and weird, the last three books of Dune are better than the first but you half to read the first to understand them obviously. I really like the first Dune book but the characters act so goddamn over dramatic, mostly SHOCKED(!) about every fucking thing going on around them, I think Herbert got better at handling characters as the series went on.

The last C. Clarke book I read was Rendezvous With Rama where astronauts find a massive cynlinder floating in space, break into it to find a dead alien city with a population of worker robots that activates, the astronauts think it is weird then leave. I can't recall a single damn character or anything happening in the book at all besides descriptions of a robot city, pretty awesome but felt sort of like a waste of time.

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Nahsil
Clerical Sturmgeschütz

Joined: Sun Jan 08, 2006 2:06 pm
Posts: 3734
Location: United States
PostPosted: Sun Aug 25, 2013 11:09 pm 
 

Varth wrote:
The first three Dune books are all a buildup to God Emperor of Dune which is completely off the wall and great as hell. I haven't read it in 10 years so I think I'm going to do that again. After the third book all the sequels take place thousands of years after the last, it gets pretty awesome and weird, the last three books of Dune are better than the first but you half to read the first to understand them obviously. I really like the first Dune book but the characters act so goddamn over dramatic, mostly SHOCKED(!) about every fucking thing going on around them, I think Herbert got better at handling characters as the series went on.


Reading the wiki, that book looks fucking insane.
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Nahsil
Clerical Sturmgeschütz

Joined: Sun Jan 08, 2006 2:06 pm
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PostPosted: Tue Aug 27, 2013 4:23 am 
 

"Once when I was a prisoner of Vodalus, I was bitten by a blood bat. There was very little pain, but a sensation of lassitude that grew more seductive every moment. When I moved my foot and startled the bat from its feast, the wind of its dark wings had seemed the very exhalation of Death. That was but the shadow, the foretaste, of what I felt then in the gangway. I was the core of the universe, as we always are to ourselves; and the universe tore like a client's rotten rags and fell in soft gray dust to nothing." - Urth of the New Sun
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RainbowPrius19
Metal newbie

Joined: Thu Jul 04, 2013 4:10 pm
Posts: 85
PostPosted: Tue Aug 27, 2013 8:21 pm 
 

Does anyone have any good fantasy books that they recommend? Preferably dark fantasy.
>inb4 LOTR
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Metantoine
The XVI, dominar to over 258714 subjects

Joined: Sat Jun 21, 2008 5:00 pm
Posts: 8599
Location: Québec
PostPosted: Tue Aug 27, 2013 8:23 pm 
 

Read The First Law trilogy by Joe Abercrombie.
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failsafeman
Digital Dictator

Joined: Wed Sep 01, 2004 8:45 am
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Location: United States
PostPosted: Wed Aug 28, 2013 2:51 am 
 

Nahsil wrote:
"Once when I was a prisoner of Vodalus, I was bitten by a blood bat. There was very little pain, but a sensation of lassitude that grew more seductive every moment. When I moved my foot and startled the bat from its feast, the wind of its dark wings had seemed the very exhalation of Death. That was but the shadow, the foretaste, of what I felt then in the gangway. I was the core of the universe, as we always are to ourselves; and the universe tore like a client's rotten rags and fell in soft gray dust to nothing." - Urth of the New Sun

Urth of the New Sun is wild. The gigantic fucking spaceship piloted by a demigod is an awesome setting, too, and that's saying something considering how great the setting in the first four books was.
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Nahsil
Clerical Sturmgeschütz

Joined: Sun Jan 08, 2006 2:06 pm
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PostPosted: Wed Aug 28, 2013 8:50 am 
 

Yeah the ship is nuts, awesomely vivid and immense aesthetic imagery going on, not to mention the actual functionality of it. You could say it's far out.
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andersbang
Metalhead

Joined: Fri Apr 03, 2009 9:28 am
Posts: 666
Location: Denmark
PostPosted: Wed Aug 28, 2013 5:38 pm 
 

Nahsil wrote:
Varth wrote:
The first three Dune books are all a buildup to God Emperor of Dune which is completely off the wall and great as hell. I haven't read it in 10 years so I think I'm going to do that again. After the third book all the sequels take place thousands of years after the last, it gets pretty awesome and weird, the last three books of Dune are better than the first but you half to read the first to understand them obviously. I really like the first Dune book but the characters act so goddamn over dramatic, mostly SHOCKED(!) about every fucking thing going on around them, I think Herbert got better at handling characters as the series went on.


Reading the wiki, that book looks fucking insane.


Indeed. I almost want to slug the way through Children of Dune (I've only read the first two, decided to call it quits after because everyone seems to agree it goes downhill from there) just to get to the apparent mindfuck of God Emperor of Dune...

..

I myself just read The Stranger by Camus for the first time, which was a quite easy read and strangely more unsettling looking back at it and digesting it than actually reading it. Next up is Occurance in the Immediate Unreality by Blecher or The Fall, also by Camus. I want to reread Sutree by McCarthy soon, too.

Oh, and I also bought (and read) five FUKITOR magazines, which are awesome. Porn-gore-exxxploitation-violence hand drawn comix. http://fukitor.blogspot.com. I think they'll have a lot of "reread value" (mainly looking at the awesome illustrations). Also got an artbook with Beksinski that I've looked through a couple times, good stuff.
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bloodycumshit
Metalhead

Joined: Sat Sep 15, 2012 11:10 pm
Posts: 493
Location: New Zealand
PostPosted: Sat Sep 07, 2013 10:15 pm 
 

There are so many historical fiction books European based but was wondering if anyone new of any Asian/Japanese or Chinese historical fiction books, particularly the samurai era ?

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andersbang
Metalhead

Joined: Fri Apr 03, 2009 9:28 am
Posts: 666
Location: Denmark
PostPosted: Sun Sep 08, 2013 4:04 pm 
 

Shogun and Tai-Pan by James Clavell about the Samurai-era and the Hong Kong trade respectively.
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Dr_Prozac
Metal newbie

Joined: Sat Jan 05, 2013 10:56 am
Posts: 35
Location: Spain
PostPosted: Sun Sep 08, 2013 11:06 pm 
 

I'm glad to see there's a thread about literature,I love literature and,in fact,in these last years I've spend much more time on it than in any other hobby that you can practice at home. These are some of my favourite novels:
-Gabriel García Marquez-Cien años de soledad (One Hundred Years of Solitude)
-Vladimir Nabokov-Lolita
-Fyodor Dostoyevsky-Crime and Punishment
-Benito Perez Galdós-Marianela
-George Orwell-1984
-The short stories by Franz Kafka

I don't know if you'll know the spanish/latin american writers I've mentioned,they're very famous among spanish speakers but I don't know if they're famous in the rest of the world,I guess that García Marquez is (he's got a nobel prize),but I don't know if Perez Galdós is internationally famous.

Right now I don't have much time to read, so I'm not reading any novel, I'm just reading a short story or two by Allan Poe or by Borges every now and then.

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bloodycumshit
Metalhead

Joined: Sat Sep 15, 2012 11:10 pm
Posts: 493
Location: New Zealand
PostPosted: Mon Sep 09, 2013 12:39 am 
 

andersbang wrote:
Shogun and Tai-Pan by James Clavell about the Samurai-era and the Hong Kong trade respectively.


thanks i will check them out

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FlaPack
Metal newbie

Joined: Mon Feb 14, 2011 9:36 am
Posts: 104
PostPosted: Mon Sep 09, 2013 3:51 pm 
 

bloodycumshit wrote:
There are so many historical fiction books European based but was wondering if anyone new of any Asian/Japanese or Chinese historical fiction books, particularly the samurai era ?


I enjoyed Yoshikawa's Taiko long ago but then again I was completely obsessed with Asia that semester (well to tell the truth it was an Asian girl but whatever). I remember it being a fairly action packed sprawling samurai epic. Got me interested in the Sengoku period. I've heard good things about his other well known novel Musashi as well.

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bloodycumshit
Metalhead

Joined: Sat Sep 15, 2012 11:10 pm
Posts: 493
Location: New Zealand
PostPosted: Tue Sep 10, 2013 12:47 am 
 

Do you mean Miyamoto Musashi ? I have read his "book of five rings" but that is only interesting if you are studying martial arts.

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Marag
Veteran

Joined: Fri Feb 27, 2009 8:55 pm
Posts: 2660
Location: down there where chaos prevails
PostPosted: Tue Sep 10, 2013 12:54 am 
 

There is a novel based on Mushashi's life, I don't think he meant the book written be the actual Musashi

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Earthcubed
Peregrinus sine aetate

Joined: Sun Nov 07, 2004 3:44 am
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Location: Orocarni
PostPosted: Tue Sep 10, 2013 1:04 am 
 

I need to get back into fiction. I am a compulsive consumer of information so non-fiction is right up my alley, but I used to never touch non-fiction. Been reading this lately, utterly fascinating: http://www.nytimes.com/2012/07/31/books ... .html?_r=0



Those Book of the New/Long/Short Sun stories sound interesting. I've never read much science fiction though.
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Scorntyrant
Metalhead

Joined: Mon Nov 15, 2004 5:55 am
Posts: 1064
PostPosted: Tue Sep 10, 2013 2:44 am 
 

So, speaking of Gene Wolfe again, I just finished "Soldier of the mist" and "The Devil in a forest". The latter was pretty average IMO, none of the awesome prose or weirdness that made the Sun books so awesome. "Soldier of the mist", on the other hand, was killer. Particularly if you know your Classics/Greek Mythology.
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bloodycumshit
Metalhead

Joined: Sat Sep 15, 2012 11:10 pm
Posts: 493
Location: New Zealand
PostPosted: Tue Sep 10, 2013 3:04 am 
 

Marag wrote:
There is a novel based on Mushashi's life, I don't think he meant the book written be the actual Musashi


That book seems quite hard to find in my little country unless i want to pay 40 bux. There are plenty
of the "The Lone Samurai: The Life of Miyamoto Musashi" books around which would be very factual, but the book Musashi sounds like a much more thrilling read.

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failsafeman
Digital Dictator

Joined: Wed Sep 01, 2004 8:45 am
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Location: United States
PostPosted: Tue Sep 10, 2013 4:39 am 
 

Scorntyrant wrote:
So, speaking of Gene Wolfe again, I just finished "Soldier of the mist" and "The Devil in a forest". The latter was pretty average IMO, none of the awesome prose or weirdness that made the Sun books so awesome. "Soldier of the mist", on the other hand, was killer. Particularly if you know your Classics/Greek Mythology.

I haven't read The Devil in a Forest, but I hardly ever see it mentioned, so it wouldn't surprise me if it were weaker. The Fifth Head of Cerberus and Peace from his early era are much better.

Soldier of the Mist on the other hand is definitely excellent; I hope you have the next two? The series isn't over yet, but there's still time for Wolfe to finish it, especially considering the fourth book will probably be the last, given his predilection for tetralogies. Latro is such a great character; his memory forces him to re-evaluate his companions every day, sometimes arriving at very different conclusions. It's a neat way to force the reader to consider the nature of character judgments - Latro is obviously an extreme case, but unless we see a person every day, how accurate can our judgment of their character be? How much is it affected by chance - maybe you met them in an uncommonly good or bad mood, maybe they gave in to some weird impulse that day, maybe you caught them in a vulnerable moment - and how might that imperfect character judgment lead to further judgments based on faulty information? Trust might be given or withheld undeservedly, or kinship, or generosity, or a million other things.

Of course Latro's memory issues affect many other things. It's just a fascinating setup, and Wolfe of course explores every nook and cranny of it he can.
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Under_Starmere
Abhorrent Fish-Man

Joined: Tue Apr 24, 2007 5:00 pm
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PostPosted: Tue Sep 10, 2013 8:02 am 
 

Ugh, Soldier in the Mist/Soldier of Arete are so fucking good.
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Icsant3
Mallcore Kid

Joined: Wed Sep 11, 2013 11:40 am
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Location: Uruguay
PostPosted: Wed Sep 11, 2013 8:41 pm 
 

Recently I finished reading Fevre Dream by George RR Martin, La Vita Nuova by Dante Alighieri and The importance of being Earnest by Oscar Wilde. I started Dune yesterday and I think it has a weird feel, I really hope the characters get more interesting on ahead.
I'm planning on reading "The name of the wind" or "Gadsby" or "Wild Cards", all of them seem interesting.

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iamntbatman
Chaos Breed

Joined: Sat Feb 21, 2009 5:55 am
Posts: 7439
Location: Innsmouth
PostPosted: Sat Oct 05, 2013 4:01 am 
 

So I just finished my first Gene Wolfe book, The Fifth Head of Cerberus. It started a bit slow but was really pretty fucking cool. Really neat world-building and it was fascinating how he tied it all together so well despite jumping across a bunch of different presentation styles throughout the three novellas. I know it's meant to be subtle and that some questions aren't really meant to be answered, but certain details leave me curious as hell:

1) It's sort of implied that the Shadow Children are actually human beings descended from some ancient spacefaring race. However, their physiology seems to have changed quite a bit from standard human in order to survive the harsh environment on St. Anne. Plus, it seems like they've also got some new evolutionary traits, like the sort of hive-mind creation of the Old Wise One and the ability to use their minds to conceal the planetary system from spacefaring human explorers through some means. If indeed the Shadow Children are human, how have they changed so much in such a relatively short period of time?

2) The Annese are all named either John or Mary, and it's implied that they copied their physical appearances from the original humans who landed there. If the aborigines also appropriated the names John and Mary, these can't have been Atlanteans or proto-neolithic humans or anything else that's suggested in the book; the names came from some more recent human society.

I suppose it's possible that the whole thing is supposed to be set so damn far into the future that 21st century-ish space exploration to alien worlds could already be ancient. Or, more likely, those are just unimportant details. I can't help but be curious, though, especially since the Shadow Children don't really get mentioned beyond the middle part of the book.

Really cool shit, though, and has me itching to read more Gene Wolfe stuff soon. Before then, though, I've got Vol. 1 of Jack Vance's Demon Princes here to read.
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bloodycumshit
Metalhead

Joined: Sat Sep 15, 2012 11:10 pm
Posts: 493
Location: New Zealand
PostPosted: Sat Oct 05, 2013 4:20 am 
 

Just read Bernard Cornwell's 'Stonehenge'. Very good book, amazing story that "who knows" could have been close to the truth.
Am also so reading "Maori healing and herbal".
It's amazing how different ancient cultures who never even knew of each other all abide there lives by the same sorts of things, gods nature spirits and rituals.

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failsafeman
Digital Dictator

Joined: Wed Sep 01, 2004 8:45 am
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Location: United States
PostPosted: Sat Oct 05, 2013 4:36 am 
 

iamntbatman wrote:
I suppose it's possible that the whole thing is supposed to be set so damn far into the future that 21st century-ish space exploration to alien worlds could already be ancient. Or, more likely, those are just unimportant details. I can't help but be curious, though, especially since the Shadow Children don't really get mentioned beyond the middle part of the book.

Just FYI, Gene Wolfe's other science-fiction books are unequivocally set super, super far into the future. His best-known one, The Book of the New Sun, is as you might have guessed, about Earth needing a new sun because the old one is dying. As for the Shadow Children, when I read the book I just assumed they were aliens, but it's definitely possible they're hyper-evolved humans too. Gene Wolfe is nothing if not ambiguous (though never just for its own sake).
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iamntbatman
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PostPosted: Sat Oct 05, 2013 1:26 pm 
 

Hmm, in that case I'm more convinced that the Shadow Children are hyper-evolved humans. The book *does* touch on what evolution might be like far into the future in other ways. For example, he brings up Dollo's law of evolutionary irreversibility, which applied to the Annese could be related to their inability to use tools. They're clearly intelligent, but not being able to really use tools effectively seems like a pretty huge disadvantage. However, since they can effectively mimic more advanced species, all they have to do is mimic humans in a post-tool age (like John Marsch) where their shitty motor skills basically result in nothing more annoying than bad penmanship. Because their motor skills are effectively vestigial, even over long periods of time they wouldn't "eventually" develop them anyway per Dollo's law if their shapeshifting allows them to effectively bypass that part of regular humanoid evolution.

I think the first novella was also a commentary on evolution; with rampant cloning and genetic engineering going on, maybe the humans of a billion years in the future are basically just hyper-idealized versions of present-day humans. However, the humans (Shadow Children) who've been on St. Anne this whole time, without access to that kind of tech, would instead evolve normally, both advancing (i.e. their psychic powers) and returning to a more primitive state that let them live as a tribal society that eats people and doesn't even have fire.
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MARSDUDE
Metalhead

Joined: Fri Apr 29, 2005 8:17 pm
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Location: Canardia
PostPosted: Sat Oct 05, 2013 1:45 pm 
 

Anyone read (or reading) Doctor Sleep? Soon as I finish Clive Barker's Books Of Blood 4-6, I'm reading Doctor Sleep.
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failsafeman
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Joined: Wed Sep 01, 2004 8:45 am
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PostPosted: Sun Oct 06, 2013 2:33 pm 
 

iamntbatman wrote:
Hmm, in that case I'm more convinced that the Shadow Children are hyper-evolved humans. The book *does* touch on what evolution might be like far into the future in other ways. For example, he brings up Dollo's law of evolutionary irreversibility, which applied to the Annese could be related to their inability to use tools. They're clearly intelligent, but not being able to really use tools effectively seems like a pretty huge disadvantage. However, since they can effectively mimic more advanced species, all they have to do is mimic humans in a post-tool age (like John Marsch) where their shitty motor skills basically result in nothing more annoying than bad penmanship. Because their motor skills are effectively vestigial, even over long periods of time they wouldn't "eventually" develop them anyway per Dollo's law if their shapeshifting allows them to effectively bypass that part of regular humanoid evolution.

I think the first novella was also a commentary on evolution; with rampant cloning and genetic engineering going on, maybe the humans of a billion years in the future are basically just hyper-idealized versions of present-day humans. However, the humans (Shadow Children) who've been on St. Anne this whole time, without access to that kind of tech, would instead evolve normally, both advancing (i.e. their psychic powers) and returning to a more primitive state that let them live as a tribal society that eats people and doesn't even have fire.

Fair points about the tools use, I read the book about 6 years ago and am a tad hazy on the details. Since you clearly enjoyed it and (I assume) want to read more Gene Wolfe, you can go a couple of different ways. You can either dive right into his Book of the New Sun series, 4 main books with 1 extra to wrap it up. Great stuff set on far-future Earth, with a setting heavily influenced by Vance's Dying Earth, but told in a totally different way. It's really dense and hard to figure out what's going on sometimes, especially since Severian is a notoriously unreliable narrator, but it's also top-notch stuff. If you'd rather just stick to single books, Peace is widely regarded as Wolfe's best standalone, a sort of mashup of mainstream fiction with horror and fantasy elements. Really complex but also rewarding. For heroic fantasy, the Wizard Knight duet is Gene Wolfe's take on deliberate fantasy cliches, but rather than simply aping the cliches or "subverting" them, he simply reinvents them entirely, keeping their essence and meaning intact (dragons are still violent and greedy, elves are still ethereal, beautiful, and aloof), but utterly changing the way they're presented and operate to the point that you can't predict what's going to happen at all. It also goes into great detail about the morality and ethos of knightly chivalry and honor, how being a knight was (ideally) about much more than just owning armor and a horse and a sword and knowing how to use them.

Really you should read all of the above, and more, but unfortunately you can't just read them all at the same time!
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Nahsil
Clerical Sturmgeschütz

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PostPosted: Sun Oct 06, 2013 5:54 pm 
 

I'd marry Gene Wolfe. I'm sad he isn't more known outside some circles.

Also sad to say I need to finish Urth.
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iamntbatman
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PostPosted: Sun Oct 06, 2013 11:10 pm 
 

Well, the library's got a whole shitload of Gene Wolfe stuff, so I'm sure I'll work my way through it all in time. Unfortunately their Jack Vance collection is extremely skimpy. They've only got Demon Princes and a couple of his most recent stand-alone books and that's it. I'll probably have to pick those up on Abe Books or something.
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Under_Starmere
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Joined: Tue Apr 24, 2007 5:00 pm
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PostPosted: Sun Oct 06, 2013 11:21 pm 
 

Everybody always needs to read more Gene Wolfe. It's one of those facts of life.

Speaking of another author everybody needs to read more of (especially around here!):

http://www.tor.com/blogs/2013/04/on-thi ... l-r-delany
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bloodycumshit
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Location: New Zealand
PostPosted: Mon Oct 07, 2013 12:34 am 
 

Since no one will shut up about him i might just have to check him out...after Shogun

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Dr_Prozac
Metal newbie

Joined: Sat Jan 05, 2013 10:56 am
Posts: 35
Location: Spain
PostPosted: Mon Oct 07, 2013 8:09 am 
 

I've finished reading "Notes from the Underground" by Dostoyevski and this time I wanted to read something completely different,so I decided to get started in science fiction,a genre that I hadn't try yet(excepting Dystopian novels such as 1984 and A Brave New World).It was a hard decision,because most of the classic novels of the genre are part of a saga,and I don't want to start a saga in this moment,but I finally chose Athur C. Clarke's "2001:A sapce Odyssey" (though I've got no intention of reading the sequels for the moment).
The novel is entertaining and the story is original and interesting,but the copy I've bought is awfully translated,so I've download a pdf with the original version and I read again in english almost every paragraph,which it makes it a little heavy.Nevertheless,I think I could enjoy this book (and the whole genre of sci-fi itself) much more if my knowledge about some scientific disciplines such as physics,biology or the ones realted to technology/engineering was bigger.

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Nahsil
Clerical Sturmgeschütz

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PostPosted: Mon Oct 07, 2013 8:13 am 
 

Clarke writes relatively "hard" science fiction meaning it tries to stay within the boundaries of science and doesn't get into a lot of "fantastical" stuff. For "softer" stuff you might want to try Dune, Ender's Game, The Left Hand of Darkness, Hyperion...more focus on characters than Clarke's stuff, at least from what I've read.
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KatyShouldKnowBetter
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PostPosted: Mon Oct 07, 2013 12:01 pm 
 

Dr_Prozac wrote:
I'm glad to see there's a thread about literature,I love literature and,in fact,in these last years I've spend much more time on it than in any other hobby that you can practice at home. These are some of my favourite novels:
-Gabriel García Marquez-Cien años de soledad (One Hundred Years of Solitude)
-Vladimir Nabokov-Lolita
-Fyodor Dostoyevsky-Crime and Punishment
-Benito Perez Galdós-Marianela
-George Orwell-1984
-The short stories by Franz Kafka

I don't know if you'll know the spanish/latin american writers I've mentioned,they're very famous among spanish speakers but I don't know if they're famous in the rest of the world,I guess that García Marquez is (he's got a nobel prize),but I don't know if Perez Galdós is internationally famous.

Right now I don't have much time to read, so I'm not reading any novel, I'm just reading a short story or two by Allan Poe or by Borges every now and then.


Have you read Tolstoy? I am certain that you would love Anna Karenina.

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Dr_Prozac
Metal newbie

Joined: Sat Jan 05, 2013 10:56 am
Posts: 35
Location: Spain
PostPosted: Tue Oct 08, 2013 5:17 pm 
 

Nahsil wrote:
Clarke writes relatively "hard" science fiction meaning it tries to stay within the boundaries of science and doesn't get into a lot of "fantastical" stuff. For "softer" stuff you might want to try Dune, Ender's Game, The Left Hand of Darkness, Hyperion...more focus on characters than Clarke's stuff, at least from what I've read.

In fact I don't dislike all those technical descriptions,but when I read them I feel sorry that I don't have the knowledge that I need to understand them totally and to know how the author has imagine that the facts he's telling could be possible in the future basing his suppositions in the cientific knowledge of his time,because I know that if I had that knowledge I would find it very interesting.

But the bright side of this is that it made me want to learn more about science so maybe I'll start reading some of those "Popular science" books.This is something really good,because though I've always been interested in social sciences such as philosophy,history or psicology I've never been interested in "hard sciences".

KatyShouldKnowBetter wrote:
Dr_Prozac wrote:
I'm glad to see there's a thread about literature,I love literature and,in fact,in these last years I've spend much more time on it than in any other hobby that you can practice at home. These are some of my favourite novels:
-Gabriel García Marquez-Cien años de soledad (One Hundred Years of Solitude)
-Vladimir Nabokov-Lolita
-Fyodor Dostoyevsky-Crime and Punishment
-Benito Perez Galdós-Marianela
-George Orwell-1984
-The short stories by Franz Kafka

I don't know if you'll know the spanish/latin american writers I've mentioned,they're very famous among spanish speakers but I don't know if they're famous in the rest of the world,I guess that García Marquez is (he's got a nobel prize),but I don't know if Perez Galdós is internationally famous.

Right now I don't have much time to read, so I'm not reading any novel, I'm just reading a short story or two by Allan Poe or by Borges every now and then.


Have you read Tolstoy? I am certain that you would love Anna Karenina.

I've read "The Death of Ivan Ilyich" this summer and I've like it so much and I have "Hadji Murat" at home,so I may read it one of these days.I'm interested in Ana Karenina more than in any other novel by Tolstoi but I don't want to read something as long as that for the moment,though I MUST read it some day.

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iamntbatman
Chaos Breed

Joined: Sat Feb 21, 2009 5:55 am
Posts: 7439
Location: Innsmouth
PostPosted: Tue Oct 08, 2013 5:34 pm 
 

Just finished the first book of Vance's Demon Princes a little while ago. It was pretty sweet, though the ending was a little anti-climactic since I was sort of expecting some bigger twist or something really heinous and cunning that would thwart Gersen's plans. It has really enticed me to keep reading to see what future Demon Princes are like, though, and what kind of stuff Gersen will have to pull off in order to get to them.
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darkeningday
Metalhead

Joined: Mon Aug 23, 2004 1:20 pm
Posts: 1842
Location: United States
PostPosted: Tue Oct 08, 2013 8:27 pm 
 

Like homosexuality in high school, it definitely Gets Better Later, batman. I was even less impressed with the first book than you but by the fourth I was about to promise my firstborn's blood to the Vance estate. It really becomes almost dangerously addictive, especially if you've got time-sensitive obligations to fulfill.

I still need to venture into the other Vance books recommended by FSM.
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Jonpo
Hypercolombowler

Joined: Tue Jul 31, 2007 10:05 am
Posts: 4404
PostPosted: Tue Oct 08, 2013 9:10 pm 
 

*slowly rises from a pile of trash in the corner*

OH HEY! WE TALKIN' VANCE???

I just recently finished Big Planet. If I've got my timeline straight I think this may actually be his first "Earthman marooned on a strange planet" novel? You can feel heavy shades of what would later be the Planet of Adventure series. It's almost like watching a really creative child in a sandbox, imagination just running wild.

The simple genius of the "Kirstendale" culture he created was so quaint and so obvious that I'm genuinely surprised it hasn't happened in the real world yet!

Just started on Marune: Alastor 933 sunday night and I'm already more than half way through it. As with everything I've read by him the pages just melt away. He's so good at a revenge plot/mystery.
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waiguoren
Metalhead

Joined: Tue Jan 27, 2009 8:23 am
Posts: 2155
Location: Make a kiss to her
PostPosted: Wed Oct 09, 2013 4:27 am 
 

Vance and Wolfe are the recurring themes in this thread, with Lovecraft popping up from time to time, and arguments about Dune, and the occasional 'I just started reading Fellowship Of The Ring' rearing its head. You should know this by now, Jonpo, it's what this thread is all about.

I just started reading Abercrombie's The Blade Itself, it's a pleasant read so far, but then, anything with torture in it is for me as there are many people I know/have known that damned well deserve to have their digits hacked off and stuck up their orifices. He is a pom but writes in an American style, which is weird, as some American fantasy writers seem to write in a pom style, if that makes any sense, and it probably doesn't, because it shouldn't, so it won't.
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failsafeman
Digital Dictator

Joined: Wed Sep 01, 2004 8:45 am
Posts: 9553
Location: United States
PostPosted: Wed Oct 09, 2013 8:46 am 
 

Hey Jonpo, have you read the Moon Moth? It's only a short story, but I think that features possibly my favorite Vancian culture (with the Darsh of Dar Sai being a strong competitor). The way the ornate masks and ridiculous instruments are described is just perfect, as are the outsider protagonist's often laughable attempts to successfully navigate the complex etiquette. Really the simple plot is essentially background to the hilarious worldbuilding and comedic scenes.
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