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PhilosophicalFrog
The Hypercube

Joined: Thu May 04, 2006 7:08 pm
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Location: United States
PostPosted: Fri Jan 04, 2013 1:29 pm 
 

Just read some Jules Verne this morning. My goodness, gracious, that 20,000 Leagues is probably the most fun book.
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The Nightmare Rider
Metal newbie

Joined: Thu Jan 03, 2013 1:51 pm
Posts: 36
Location: United Kingdom
PostPosted: Sun Jan 06, 2013 7:32 pm 
 

I have currently ordered the Legend of Drizzt box set 2, containing books 4-6. I am a BIG fan of R.A Salvatore, and the Dark Elf Trilogy is currently my favourite book series. The way he writes action scenes is simply fantastic and engrossing. Plus he's a great writer of culture, to make the characters drastically contrast with it.

I'm also planning to buy the first book in Dragonlance Chronicles series, "Dragons of Autumn Twilight". Been given a good recommendation for this book and can't wait to read it!

Is anyone here a writer themselves? I write short fantasy stories, inspired allot by Power Metal and the fantasy literature I write. I am currently writing a short story called "Nazkrug the Gladiator", which is about an Orc named Nazkrug being held captive by dark elves in a gladiatorial arena. He must make alliances with the other gladiators to stay alive, but also face some of the toughest and most dangerous opponents ever. And this time there may be a slim chance of him escaping once and for all...

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Zelkiiro
Pounding the world with a fish of steel

Joined: Sat Apr 18, 2009 5:30 pm
Posts: 4130
Location: United States
PostPosted: Sun Jan 06, 2013 8:45 pm 
 

PhilosophicalFrog wrote:
Just read some Jules Verne this morning. My goodness, gracious, that 20,000 Leagues is probably the most fun book.

All of the man's major works are awesome. I've not read his essays or plays, but I bet they're awesome, too.
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Nahsil
Clerical Sturmgeschütz

Joined: Sun Jan 08, 2006 2:06 pm
Posts: 3867
Location: United States
PostPosted: Sun Jan 06, 2013 8:47 pm 
 

Is his writing less dry than H.G. Wells?
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Zelkiiro
Pounding the world with a fish of steel

Joined: Sat Apr 18, 2009 5:30 pm
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Location: United States
PostPosted: Sun Jan 06, 2013 8:48 pm 
 

Nahsil wrote:
Is his writing less dry than H.G. Wells?

Much less.
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bloodycumshit
Metalhead

Joined: Sat Sep 15, 2012 11:10 pm
Posts: 517
Location: New Zealand
PostPosted: Mon Jan 07, 2013 12:58 am 
 

Reading Richard Laymon's night in lonesome october, fuck he's a legend of that genre

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Abominatrix
Harbinger of Metal

Joined: Fri Oct 24, 2003 12:15 pm
Posts: 10267
Location: Canada
PostPosted: Tue Jan 08, 2013 12:45 pm 
 

Jonpo wrote:
I was at a loss for more music to order with my amazon gift card so I decided to splurge on my favorite author, the illustrious Jack Vance. Here's what I came away with:

Nopalgarth (The whole series in one edition. Contains: Nopalgarth, Son of the Tree, and The Houses of Iszm)

The Asutra (This is the conclusion of the Durdane trilogy. I read the first two about a year ago and never got around to ordering the third. Probably going to start from the beginning as I remember being very endeared to Gastel Etzwane's drama)

Big Planet and Showboat World (These are part of the same story I guess? I read a very brief description of "Big Planet" and it sounded exactly like the kind of setting Vance could stretch out in. Crash land on a hostile planet...fight for survival/escape)

The Languages of Pao

Suldrun's Garden, Madouc, and The Green Pearl (The legendary Lyonesse trilogy. I've already read these three in a digital copy but that's just not proper. Looking forward to re-reading this one once the paperbacks show up. Definitely his most "sword and sorcery" series but it's got that engimatic Vancian touch in the cultures/characters/dialogue.)

Araminta Station and Ecce and Old Earth (Books 1 and 2 of the Cadwal Chronicles. Unfortunately the third one, Throy, was way too expensive so I'm hoping to pick that up later. No real clue what this series is about but I have a lot of faith, obviously.)

Marune, Wyst, and Trullion (The Alastor series! This is probably his most well-known work that I haven't read yet. Once again I haven't even bothered to get an idea what the story is about. I've got a distinct feeling it will involve long voyages with disparate characters and the most colorful cultures imaginable.)

The Dragon Masters and The Five Gold Bands (Two stand-alone novels, issued in a double-pack for the miserly among us. I haven't read many stand-alone works by Vance outside of The Blue World. I'm expecting these to be incredibly punchy and colorful. I think one or the other is a HUGO winner, not that that means much to me really.)

So there it is! I can't wait for some of these to start showing up. If he has a substandard work to his name I'm about to find it.


Aha, I didn't realise you never got around to The Asutra. Yeah, I'd maybe go over the first two again at least, because the third book is pretty dark and grim...and more impactful if you remember what came before. The surprise death at the end of Brave free Men is only a taster.

I haven't read the Alastor books either! I have really high hopes for them, though.
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Jonpo
Hypercolombowler

Joined: Tue Jul 31, 2007 10:05 am
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 08, 2013 12:56 pm 
 

Ahaha I guess I'm going to have to, because I don't even remember who dies at the end of Brave Free Men. I'm looking forward to it, honestly. I particularly remember a hilarious exchange between Gastel and one of the "balloon boys" or whatever they were called that operate those transporters on the wires.

I'm beginning to wonder if it matters at all which order I read the Alastor stuff in. Wyst showed up first, which I thought was the end of the series, but the descriptions I'm reading now make it sound as if they are all loosely collected and just happen to center around the same cluster.
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Nahsil
Clerical Sturmgeschütz

Joined: Sun Jan 08, 2006 2:06 pm
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 08, 2013 1:05 pm 
 

Yay, I got Book of the New Sun back from the library, time to finish it! I was in Sword of the Lictor.
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Abominatrix
Harbinger of Metal

Joined: Fri Oct 24, 2003 12:15 pm
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 08, 2013 1:37 pm 
 

Jonpo, yeah, I don't think they're meant to be in sequence at all.
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failsafeman
Digital Dictator

Joined: Wed Sep 01, 2004 8:45 am
Posts: 9727
Location: United States
PostPosted: Tue Jan 08, 2013 3:03 pm 
 

Abominatrix wrote:
Aha, I didn't realise you never got around to The Asutra. Yeah, I'd maybe go over the first two again at least, because the third book is pretty dark and grim...and more impactful if you remember what came before. The surprise death at the end of Brave free Men is only a taster.

Oh man, you ain't kidding, if that surprise death is a sucker punch (and a great one, too) then The Asutra has a whole bunch of them. Honestly I think the Durdane trilogy is tied with the Demon Princes for his best work, though I still haven't read anywhere close to all of them.

Jonpo, you gotta let us know what you think of all those Vance books, you've picked up a few I'm not familiar with.
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Jonpo
Hypercolombowler

Joined: Tue Jul 31, 2007 10:05 am
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 08, 2013 3:42 pm 
 

I keep going back and forth on my favorite series of his. Honestly I think it's just whichever I'm reading at the time. I've read both The Dying Earth and Demon Princes twice, and I constantly waffle back and forth. I'll probably go for a third when I get them back off loan. Can't really make any clear statement on the Durdane situation until I re-read them. I've forgotten so much. I will say that I really love the way he incorporated his knowledge/appreciation of music (especially jazz) into that one. The descriptions he comes up with for sounds and moods and textures of the various music played by the travelling troupe is just wondrous. I also got REALLY emotionally attached to some of the Lyonesse characters so I think that one might be in the running.

Man, I just got four of them in yesterday and I'm tearing through The Dragon Masters already, which looks like it's going to be really short and punchy. Highly recommended. It feels like the sort of story that he would have devoted a paragraph to describing in a much bigger novel, and then liked the idea so much he just decided to expand on it.
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LanceCriminal
Metal newbie

Joined: Sun Jan 13, 2013 6:25 am
Posts: 75
Location: United States
PostPosted: Mon Jan 14, 2013 10:03 am 
 

Just started reading The Way of Men by Jack Donovan...outstanding so far.

I got a brand new paperwhite Kindle for an early birthday gift a couple months ago, I was skeptical at first but I'm totally loving it. I'm free to read more books for cheaper, even cheaper than used book stores, and choose from a wider variety. All those hard to find indie-published novels and short stories I always thought looked cool but just couldn't afford to shell out ten or twelve bucks a pop for the real thing...usually between 99 cents and six bucks for that sort of thing via digital medium.

Yeah, I've been tearing through that stuff like candy. :lol: Currently picking away at the American Apocalypse series by 'Nova' and enjoying it tremendously. All the classic joys of end of the world stories like vigilante justice and firefights with government troops with a lot less of the usual political preachy-ness (and thank the dark gods, none of that "christian warriors reclaiming 'merica for jeebus" nonsense that so common in survivalist lit...in fact he pokes fun at it quite a bit) and, while there's a small dose of action cliches, they manage to control the over the top gung-ho shit a little better than most books. It's pretty realistic while still having plenty of suspense and action. (Most people don't mind that sort of thing, I can't read that crap without picking it apart) Halfway through the second book and I give it the thumbs up so far if you're looking for a fun easy read...I can't put this one down.

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TheMizwaOfMuzzyTah
Metalhead

Joined: Tue Feb 09, 2010 2:18 pm
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Location: Abyss of Hallucinations
PostPosted: Mon Jan 14, 2013 1:24 pm 
 

Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde is one of those classic tales that satisfied every time you read it.

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bloodycumshit
Metalhead

Joined: Sat Sep 15, 2012 11:10 pm
Posts: 517
Location: New Zealand
PostPosted: Mon Jan 14, 2013 2:19 pm 
 

LanceCriminal wrote:
Just started reading The Way of Men by Jack Donovan...outstanding so far.

I got a brand new paperwhite Kindle for an early birthday gift a couple months ago, I was skeptical at first but I'm totally loving it. I'm free to read more books for cheaper, even cheaper than used book stores, and choose from a wider variety. All those hard to find indie-published novels and short stories I always thought looked cool but just couldn't afford to shell out ten or twelve bucks a pop for the real thing...usually between 99 cents and six bucks for that sort of thing via digital medium.



meh..i can find those kind of books for about 2 bux at my local hospice quite easily..can't stand digital reading myself,that's just me though

never thought i'd say this but this Richard Laymon book im reading is total shit,started good with rape and cannibalism and has been shit for the rest of the book...it better have a fucking good ending.Looking forward to my "way of the wyrd" to turn up in the mail

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Nahsil
Clerical Sturmgeschütz

Joined: Sun Jan 08, 2006 2:06 pm
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Location: United States
PostPosted: Mon Jan 14, 2013 4:13 pm 
 

Lady friend let me borrow a collection of David Foster Wallace short stories. Never read him but heard lots.
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Post_Human_Shadows
Metal newbie

Joined: Wed Apr 20, 2005 3:36 pm
Posts: 84
Location: United States of America
PostPosted: Mon Jan 14, 2013 10:17 pm 
 

So I read The Metamorphosis for the first time, and it pretty much ruined last night for me. Couldn't bother thinking straight or feeling right after that, no way.... not that I expected Kafka to conjure tranquil, rolling green pastures.

Nahsil wrote:
Lady friend let me borrow a collection of David Foster Wallace short stories. Never read him but heard lots.


The only piece I read so far by him, The Devil is a Busy Man, made me put on the moral thinking cap. Maybe Infinite Jest, a 1000 pager hailed as his stand-out work, can do the same; but I think Moby Dick and IT are first up in line for fictional marathon material.
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Nahsil
Clerical Sturmgeschütz

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PostPosted: Mon Jan 14, 2013 11:57 pm 
 

Moby Dick is such a pain. It's got its moments and overall I think somewhat highly of it, but good god, Melville.

I'll stick to his shorter works.
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Empyreal
The Final Frontier

Joined: Thu Nov 30, 2006 6:58 pm
Posts: 19350
Location: Where the dead rule the night
PostPosted: Tue Jan 15, 2013 12:01 am 
 

Post_Human_Shadows wrote:
So I read The Metamorphosis for the first time, and it pretty much ruined last night for me. Couldn't bother thinking straight or feeling right after that, no way.... not that I expected Kafka to conjure tranquil, rolling green pastures.


I hated The Metamorphosis. I can respect Kafka from what I know about his tortured life and all, but The Metamorphosis is too long and just drags on forever. I guess that was the intent, to give the story a kind of drugged out feel, but hey, so what.

And personally none of Melville's shorter works have done it for me like Moby Dick. Didn't really like Bartleby the Scrivener, and the other stuff I read was good enough I suppose, just didn't electrify me like Moby Dick did - God, that was a powerful fucking book.
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Nahsil
Clerical Sturmgeschütz

Joined: Sun Jan 08, 2006 2:06 pm
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 15, 2013 12:19 am 
 

Bartleby's one of his more well-known and it's not bad. I like The Piazza and The Paradise of Bachelors and the Tartarus of Maids better, probably.

Btw Kafka's Trial is a great book. Haven't managed to finish Metamorphosis.
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Last edited by Nahsil on Tue Jan 15, 2013 1:07 am, edited 2 times in total.
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RedMisanthrope
Poet Laureate of the Old Ones

Joined: Sat May 19, 2007 1:53 pm
Posts: 1959
Location: United States of America
PostPosted: Tue Jan 15, 2013 12:31 am 
 

I received a $50 dollar Barnes and Noble gift card from my mother on Christmas. Got around to cashing it in today.

Joseph Conrad: Heart of Darkness
Charles Dickens: A Tale of Two Cities
Gabriel Garcia Marquez: 100 Years of Solitude
John Steinbeck: Grapes of Wrath
Christopher Hitchens: Arguably

A lot of literary classics that I've been meaning to pick up for a while. Right now I'm reading "Suttree" by Cormac McCarthy. "Blood Meridian" (my favorite book ever) is more acclaimed, but a lot of diehards tell me that this is his meisterwerk. At over four hundred pages long, it may as well be eight hundred. His vocabulary is beyond astounding.
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Ancient_Sorrow
Metalhead

Joined: Fri Feb 11, 2011 2:10 pm
Posts: 2215
Location: Scotland
PostPosted: Tue Jan 15, 2013 9:08 am 
 

I finished Joseph Conrad's short-story "Youth" last night. Really enjoyable stuff, and a narrative which really balances delicately between portraying the loss of youth, and the futility of many of it's endeavours, but at the same time glorifies it. As the reader it was difficult indeed to settle upon finding the story depressing or elating. While it didn't have much of a feeling of peril or adventure, I assume from being more symbolic and metaphorical than in any way swashbuckling, it was also an enjoyable tale of sea travel on the literal level, even if everything which can possibly go wrong for the crew does.

It came in a volume with Heart of Darkness and some other things, which I will be reading next - the style was fantastically readable but at the same time there was a lot of symbolism and content crammed into twenty seven pages.
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Azmodes
Ultranaut

Joined: Fri Nov 02, 2007 10:44 am
Posts: 6097
Location: Gradec, Austria
PostPosted: Tue Jan 15, 2013 10:10 am 
 

Almost through with Fulgrim (5th Horus Heresy novel). Still good pacing, dialogue, action, atmosphere and (most) characters. Add to that a surprising amount of depth. And Eldar! Woohoo. I also like how the novels so far cross over with previous ones and explore the unfolding story from different perspectives, adding new details and insights to previous books. Graham McNeill isn't Dan Abnett, that I noticed, but he does a good job regardless, although he sometimes gets carried away with all the "OMFG PRIMARCH/ASTARTES" descriptions. I could have done without the 25th mention of how Fulgrim causes spontaneous orgasms in everyone in the room or how demigodly Space Marines are. Minor nitpick, though, guess that comes with the setting. Ben Counter, as someone already mentioned, knows how to write a battle and Galaxy in Flames was pretty intense in that regard. The account of the Eisenstein I also enjoyed, especially
Spoiler: show
the appearance of Dorn's flying fortress plus fleet and the not-so-warm welcome Garro and his little band received. Their frustration and despair were conveyed well.


With all the different authors involved so far I think they did a pretty great job at creating a reasonably smooth overall story.
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Empyreal
The Final Frontier

Joined: Thu Nov 30, 2006 6:58 pm
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Location: Where the dead rule the night
PostPosted: Tue Jan 15, 2013 12:31 pm 
 

Nahsil wrote:
Bartleby's one of his more well-known and it's not bad. I like The Piazza and The Paradise of Bachelors and the Tartarus of Maids better, probably.


I haven't read either of those two stories. I guess I should check em out, no? ;) Moby Dick though, despite being unwieldy and by all accounts it shouldn't work...really inspired me, and the writing is excellent. The story is incredibly triumphant and meaningful really - a great tale of fate and what matters to a man. Ahab is really one of my favorite characters in literature.
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Nahsil
Clerical Sturmgeschütz

Joined: Sun Jan 08, 2006 2:06 pm
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Location: United States
PostPosted: Tue Jan 15, 2013 1:30 pm 
 

It's got a large scope and a lot of depth and Melville was definitely brilliant, and it's probably proto post-modernism, but I found it tedious to read. The fact that I chose to write a final essay over its meaning probably factors into my disdain :P

Because fuck if anybody in literary criticism can agree on what that book's singular meaning is. The post-modern criticism is especially ridiculous. I went with it being an anti-Transcendentalist text, anti-religions of nature, but if that's even partly true, it's definitely only partly, and I knew that as I was writing the paper. Frustrating.

Conrad's Heart of Darkness is so well written, beautiful book.
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metaldiscussor666
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Joined: Tue Sep 18, 2012 9:09 pm
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 15, 2013 3:30 pm 
 

The book I've gotten into more than any other book in a long time--Metalion The slayer Mag Archives. It gives really good insight into the culture of earlier metal. When I ordered it, I thought it would be a book full of just mags, and it turned out to be more than that! Good stuff.
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Dragunov
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 15, 2013 7:54 pm 
 

I went to a local bookstore to pick up the first few Horus Heresy books, but they didn't have them. They did have a good amount of Omnibus books though. For someone that hasn't read any of the WH40K novels, it's my understanding that I can start pretty much anywhere. Is this correct?
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wreath_of_coils
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Joined: Thu Jun 02, 2011 12:38 am
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PostPosted: Wed Jan 16, 2013 8:40 pm 
 

Just finished Chuck Palahniuk's Snuff. It's about a 600 man gang bang (that's a lotta dicks huh?) and basically the story centers around three of the participants (Mr. 72, Mr. 137 and Mr. 600 respectively) and the gang bang enchantress herself Cassie Wright. I found this book to be damn good fun in a demented sort of way. And it pulled out quite a few unsuspected laughs as well.

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Razakel
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Joined: Wed Dec 06, 2006 8:36 pm
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PostPosted: Thu Jan 17, 2013 12:06 am 
 

RedMisanthrope wrote:
A lot of literary classics that I've been meaning to pick up for a while. Right now I'm reading "Suttree" by Cormac McCarthy. "Blood Meridian" (my favorite book ever) is more acclaimed, but a lot of diehards tell me that this is his meisterwerk. At over four hundred pages long, it may as well be eight hundred. His vocabulary is beyond astounding.


What a coincidence, I got Suttree for Christmas and just finished it last night. I absolutely loved it, McCarthy's prose gets me every time. Some passages were just unreal. Out of the four books I've read of his, it would be my second favourite behind Blood Meridian (yes, it's also one of my favourite novels).

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RedMisanthrope
Poet Laureate of the Old Ones

Joined: Sat May 19, 2007 1:53 pm
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PostPosted: Thu Jan 17, 2013 1:38 am 
 

Razakel wrote:
RedMisanthrope wrote:
A lot of literary classics that I've been meaning to pick up for a while. Right now I'm reading "Suttree" by Cormac McCarthy. "Blood Meridian" (my favorite book ever) is more acclaimed, but a lot of diehards tell me that this is his meisterwerk. At over four hundred pages long, it may as well be eight hundred. His vocabulary is beyond astounding.


What a coincidence, I got Suttree for Christmas and just finished it last night. I absolutely loved it, McCarthy's prose gets me every time. Some passages were just unreal. Out of the four books I've read of his, it would be my second favourite behind Blood Meridian (yes, it's also one of my favourite novels).


Awesome man. I'm about a fourth of the way through; I'm a very slow reader, but so far I'm impressed, as always. Just that intro with the italic font...most of the time I was saying to myself "What are these words?".
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Scorntyrant
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Joined: Mon Nov 15, 2004 5:55 am
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PostPosted: Thu Jan 17, 2013 5:15 am 
 

Just finished "Interrogations - the Nazi elite in allied hands", which was quite fascinating. About half of the book sets the context, then the rest is verbatim transcripts of the interviews with Speer, Hess, Georing, Keitel, Ley etc. Also recently finished "Life after Death" by Damien Echols. It's his account of the 17 years he spent on death row for the West memphis three murders. Surprisingly upbeat despite the horrific subject matter. And "Ravenwing" by Gav Thorpe - good olde 40k pulp. Finished the first 2 books in the "Danilov quartet" ("Twelve" and "thirteen years later") by Jasper Kent - entertaining pulp great for the commute into work. Nearly done with "A dance with dragons".....sort of felt that dragged a bit. Maybe I'm just reaching the "get to the damn point already" stage with Martin.

Next up are the 3 books that arrived in the mail the other day - "Storm of Steel" (Ernst Junger), "Revolt against the modern world" and "Metaphysics of War" by Julius Evola. All 3 are things I've been meaning to read for years.

My new years resolution was to keep track of everything I read this year. To that end I'm using Goodreads.com. I know it's a lot in any given year as I read about 2 or 3 hours a day (30 mins on the tram into work, an hour at lunchtime, 30 mins home and an hour before bed) but I've never tracked it enough to come up with a list before.
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TheMizwaOfMuzzyTah
Metalhead

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PostPosted: Thu Jan 17, 2013 1:09 pm 
 

Reading Dubliners by James Joyce. The man perfected the craft of the short story. In fact, I'd perhaps rank him among my favorite short story writers, and those that I consider the best. The realness of his tales, combined with the occasional element of unease, makes for quite a juicy and unforgettable reading experience. And better yet, you can re-read each of his stories and pick up on new subtexts, etc., every time.

The Portrait of the Artist... is next. I wanted to start that one first, but decided I'd take on his prose chronologically. Chamber Music doesn't count as it is poetry. Mighty fine poetry, I might add. I found an old Viking Portable of his collected works (everything except the Wake and Ulysses, obviously), and find myself skimming through Chamber Music and Pomes Penyeach throughout the days.

But yeah, Dubliners is excellent. The Sisters filled me with a sense of unease and anxiousness, as well as a deathly serenity. Joyce really hypnotizes you with his realistic prose and incredibly realistic dialogue. I find his take on the Catholic upbrining very interesting, being raised Catholic myself. An Encounter was quite effective, and saunters nicely into unexpected territory. I just finished After the Race this morning, and would like to read it again as I sense a lot of initially undetected social and ethical commentary. In it, a Frenchman, a Hungarian, an Irishman and an American take to a night on the town.

I am very excited to finish this book. I'm more excited to start The Portrait, though.

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Rild
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Joined: Sun Jul 05, 2009 2:38 pm
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Location: Vancouver
PostPosted: Sat Jan 19, 2013 12:20 am 
 

Scorntyrant wrote:
Next up are the 3 books that arrived in the mail the other day - "Storm of Steel" (Ernst Junger), "Revolt against the modern world" and "Metaphysics of War" by Julius Evola. All 3 are things I've been meaning to read for years.

I'm interested to hear where you ordered Storm of Steel from, and how mucho it costo?
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Scorntyrant
Metalhead

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PostPosted: Sat Jan 19, 2013 4:05 am 
 

It's out in penguin classics now, so you can get it anywhere for around $10.
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DisembowelMe
Metalhead

Joined: Thu Aug 09, 2007 10:59 am
Posts: 539
Location: Iceland
PostPosted: Tue Jan 29, 2013 1:02 pm 
 

I occasionally work at a place that goes through stuff people throw away to resell, and my god have I been hoarding books from there..

Men Who Hate Women (Stieg Larsson)
Crime and Punishment (Dostoevsky)
Hard Times (Dickens)
Spirits of the Dead: Tales And Poems (Edgar Allan Poe, Penguin publishing)
Misery (Stephen King)
The Tommyknockers (Stephen King)
The Shining (Stephen King)
Cell (Stephen King)
The Discovery Of Society (Randall Collins, Michael Makowsky. Haven't read, but deals with sociology)
Civilization and Its Discontents (Sigmund Freud, translated)
Philosophy And The Young Child (Dno, I pretty much snag up every book that seems to deal with philosophy)
How The Mind Works (Steven Pinker)
The Republic (Plato)
Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion (David Hume, translated)

most of which are in a good condition, plus a few more I've acquired from libraries and flea markets which I'll spare you from listing. I basically have enough literature to last me for more than a year. (would be less wasn't my brain addled with ADD's)

Either way, been reading Heldenhammer in the Legend Of Sigmar omnibus (Warhammer Fantasy) by Graham McNeill and enjoy it quite a bit. It feels a tad pulpy for it's bare minimum quality dialogue, but the storyline itself is pretty gripping and the world immersive, with at least a single tearjerking moment so far, so it definitely isn't just pure fanboy jerkoff material. (without being unbiased enough to even make such a claim, heh)

Also, has anyone noticed how many of the newer Black Library titles have these really shitty covers, especially the Time of Legends and Horus Heresy series? Time of Legends look like artwork promoting a JRPG game with it's stylized digivomit, while many Horus Heresy covers look like done with 3D models when not obscured by photoshop magic. It just feels tastelessly digital as fuck, and I literally can't bring myself to spend any amount of money to have trash like that degrading my bookcase, which sucks because I really wanted to check out the Horus Heresy series having been teased with tiny tidbits of history of that arc since I was a kid. Thankfully, the artists who did the Time of Legends omnibuses don't seem to have been dragged out of the gutter, because the style used there actually feels much closer to being timeless and genuine as all good Warhammer artwork is. Let's hope the future of Horus Heresy will be the same.

Maybe I've just been spoiled by all the amazing artwork in the older Warhammer rulebooks though..

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Nahsil
Clerical Sturmgeschütz

Joined: Sun Jan 08, 2006 2:06 pm
Posts: 3867
Location: United States
PostPosted: Tue Jan 29, 2013 7:50 pm 
 

Finally around to finishing Book of the New Sun. It's so damn good! I love Gene Wolfe. Nearing the end of Sword of the Lictor and I've been savoring his adventures up in the mountains. Just got to the lake town.
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Under_Starmere
Abhorrent Fish-Man

Joined: Tue Apr 24, 2007 5:00 pm
Posts: 4419
Location: United States of America
PostPosted: Tue Jan 29, 2013 8:22 pm 
 

Gwwaaahh you're making me want to read it again! :hyper: The mountain section was just beautiful. Though...which parts weren't, really. Right now I'm almost halfway through The Book of the Long Sun, having picked it back up after about a year and half away from it. Really enjoying it. It's amazing how different in tone it is than New Sun, it's a lot...breezier, more candid, more innocent-feeling, as opposed to the sense of insane density you find in its predecessor. Almost to the end of the first volume and it's starting to get quite heady. Like all Wolfe that I've read, I really have no idea where this is leading; it's so dreamlike and obtuse, yet so elegantly rendered.

Think you'll read The Urth of the New Sun when you're done with BotNS, Nahsil? Talk about dreamlike...fucking hell.

And I know I've mentioned this in passing before, but have any of you sci-fi/fantasy heads read any of the Nevèrÿon books by Samuel R Delany? Or any Delany, for that matter? He's by far one of the most interesting sci-fi/fantasy authors I can invoke, and yet I never hear people even mention him here, let alone discuss his work. I think some of you folks might really, really like what he does.
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Nahsil
Clerical Sturmgeschütz

Joined: Sun Jan 08, 2006 2:06 pm
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Location: United States
PostPosted: Tue Jan 29, 2013 8:51 pm 
 

I came across some literary criticism for Delaney while I was in a science fiction and empire literature course. I'd like to read him eventually, seems to be a big name in literary scifi.

I'm sure I'll read that eventually, but I'll take a break from Wolfe when I'm done with this. I've got David Foster Wallace, Kurt Vonnegut, Alan Watts, Irvin Yalom, Aldous Huxley, Umberto Eco, George Saunders and others lined up.
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John_Sunlight
President Satan

Joined: Tue Apr 20, 2010 4:41 am
Posts: 4748
PostPosted: Tue Jan 29, 2013 9:06 pm 
 

Any of you guys know any good war memoirs or good books about less cliche wars like the iraq/iran war or the ethiopia/eritrea war? African bushwars? Maoists in asia? Comedy skits in south america? etc etc etc. Been interested in reading about cool wars lately (IE: not the world wars or the civil war).
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failsafeman
Digital Dictator

Joined: Wed Sep 01, 2004 8:45 am
Posts: 9727
Location: United States
PostPosted: Wed Jan 30, 2013 12:39 am 
 

Under_Starmere wrote:
Think you'll read The Urth of the New Sun when you're done with BotNS, Nahsil? Talk about dreamlike...fucking hell.

Yeah, you HAVE to read that one. It's stupid that it's separate, without it all the prophecies and shit in the first four don't really get a conclusion.

Under_Starmere wrote:
And I know I've mentioned this in passing before, but have any of you sci-fi/fantasy heads read any of the Nevèrÿon books by Samuel R Delany? Or any Delany, for that matter? He's by far one of the most interesting sci-fi/fantasy authors I can invoke, and yet I never hear people even mention him here, let alone discuss his work. I think some of you folks might really, really like what he does.

I haven't read the Neveryon books, but I did read the monolithic Dhalgren, which took me a long time to get through but I enjoyed it a lot. It's one of those dense books during the reading of which I take a break to read a shorter, lighter book. It's fantasy in that the setting is inherently fantastical, in fact a lot like the Zone from Stalker/Roadside Picnic, in that a bizarre event of some kind happened to a modern-day US city and now it's really weird there. But it's much less dangerous than the Zone, and the story basically follows one character's journey into, and eventually out of, the city. He finds gangs, weird hippie communes, crazy artists, etc., all sorts of people who have chosen to live there for various reasons, and over time you figure out why he has chosen to live there. It's like modern literary fiction in that it's all about characters talking and their developing relationships and such, without a lot of forced drama, except with this really unsettling spin on everything. There are all sorts of weird omens, surreal events, that kind of thing. There's A LOT of social commentary, transgressive sex, philosophy, etc. but it's not ham-handedly delivered for the most part. Anyway I'd recommend it as long as people know what they're getting into.
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