Encyclopaedia Metallum: The Metal Archives

Message board

* FAQ    * Search   * Register   * Login 



Reply to topic  
Author Message Previous topic | Next topic
iAm
Wastelander

Joined: Tue Nov 20, 2007 12:18 am
Posts: 5629
Location: West of the Duwamish due South of the Sound
PostPosted: Mon Dec 17, 2012 1:04 am 
 

bodomlord wrote:
What are some cool occult books in they vein of the Necronomicon, the Satanic Bible, and the Liber Falxifer? (preferably in English)

The Bible.
_________________
iamntbatman wrote:
If the U.N. flew a bunch of C130's over Syria and rained down boxes of Thin Mints, they'd be standing in a giant circle hand-in-hand singing like goddamn Whoville residents within an hour.

I hate music

Top
 Profile  
PhilosophicalFrog
The Hypercube

Joined: Thu May 04, 2006 7:08 pm
Posts: 5648
Location: United States
PostPosted: Mon Dec 17, 2012 1:23 pm 
 

Tree of Life, Garden of Pomegranates, Golden Dawn, The Book of Enoch, Practical Magick, The Grand Grimoire (WHICH I'M SELLING), The Book of Solomon
_________________
BAPTIST - dr((((((((((((( )))))))))))))ne, Meditation, Ambient
I write funny things on twitter

Top
 Profile  
TheMizwaOfMuzzyTah
Metalhead

Joined: Tue Feb 09, 2010 2:18 pm
Posts: 1129
PostPosted: Mon Dec 17, 2012 1:31 pm 
 

PhilosophicalFrog is the keeper of the cheese. We are only the lemon merchants.

Top
 Profile  
FlaPack
Metal newbie

Joined: Mon Feb 14, 2011 9:36 am
Posts: 104
PostPosted: Mon Dec 17, 2012 2:51 pm 
 

Does Principia Discordia count as occult literature?

On a different note, does anyone have any good suggestions for young children's literature? I have always looked forward to being able to read to my children and get them interested in the same stuff that I read when I was younger. Unfortunately even sci-fi juveniles are a little too much for my three year old right now. Any suggestions that could keep me from reading the same Dr. Seuss and Sendak books over and over and over would be appreciated.

Top
 Profile  
Det_Morkettall
Metalhead

Joined: Wed Dec 29, 2010 12:02 am
Posts: 610
Location: Canada
PostPosted: Mon Dec 17, 2012 4:42 pm 
 

Bodomlord, if you like, I'm selling The Satanic Rituals, The Key of Solomon the King, and Grimorium Verum right now. Those are all really great books in terms of occultism.

Started reading 1984 today. Got six pages in; didn't have a lot of time. Great prose so far!
_________________
AIR Distro List | Facebook
whatajoke wrote:
Is he fucking that sloppy cunt of Morrigan's? She is a hypocrite! Calls me a child, then after she bans me she uses my name to make a fake post!

Lol

Top
 Profile  
Calusari
Metalhead

Joined: Thu Apr 27, 2006 1:36 am
Posts: 707
PostPosted: Tue Dec 18, 2012 8:35 am 
 

Re occult books, would 'Zohar' and the Sixth and Seventh books of Moses count?

Top
 Profile  
DeathfareDevil
Metalhead

Joined: Mon Nov 29, 2004 11:30 am
Posts: 526
Location: United States of America
PostPosted: Tue Dec 18, 2012 10:19 am 
 

bodomlord wrote:
What are some cool occult books in they vein of the Necronomicon, the Satanic Bible, and the Liber Falxifer? (preferably in English)


Agrippa's Three Books of Occult Philosophy is the mother lode, but good luck plowing through it. Had it for probably twenty years, never could get traction. Of course I probably had no reason to be trying. Not exactly a practical volume, that one, and it's not something one can really read "for pleasure."

Crowley's autobiography, The Confessions of Aleister Crowley, is actually really interesting if a little unwieldy. For all his narcissism, he was an intelligent, well read guy who lived a robust life, and makes for a decent raconteur. I hope you like hearing about mountain climbing, though.

Top
 Profile  
failsafeman
Digital Dictator

Joined: Wed Sep 01, 2004 8:45 am
Posts: 9547
Location: United States
PostPosted: Tue Dec 18, 2012 1:08 pm 
 

FlaPack wrote:
Does Principia Discordia count as occult literature?

On a different note, does anyone have any good suggestions for young children's literature? I have always looked forward to being able to read to my children and get them interested in the same stuff that I read when I was younger. Unfortunately even sci-fi juveniles are a little too much for my three year old right now. Any suggestions that could keep me from reading the same Dr. Seuss and Sendak books over and over and over would be appreciated.

TINTIN!
_________________
antonthereaper wrote:
Seriously, why ban me??????? That topic had nothing wrong with it! Theres something wrong with you i can tell you! You're immoral banning of my account! Anyways, i'm creating my own metal arcives.

http://extrememetalencyclopedia.webs.com/

Top
 Profile  
inhumanist
Metal freak

Joined: Fri Jan 14, 2011 5:09 pm
Posts: 4204
Location: 50 Forts Along The Rhine
PostPosted: Tue Dec 18, 2012 1:23 pm 
 

...is kinda racist. :|
_________________
Celtic Frosted Flakes wrote:
Compared to how it is here in Sweden, fascism sounds like paradise.
Metantoine wrote:
If Summoning is the sugar of fantasy metal, is Manowar the bacon?

Top
 Profile  
Ancient_Sorrow
Metalhead

Joined: Fri Feb 11, 2011 2:10 pm
Posts: 2168
Location: Scotland
PostPosted: Tue Dec 18, 2012 1:30 pm 
 

Quote:
...is totally racist...


Some of the cornerstones of my childhood were the things I look at now and go "Holy fuck, that's racist". Tintin is a prime example, but at the same time, thoroughly enjoyable. Same goes for the Tom and Jerry cartoons, a boxed-set of which I recently purchased.

I can't really remember what I had read to me at age three - Tons of accessible factual books like the "eyewitness" series, which is essentially a series of books containing photographs and really basic information about a range of things - really got me into science, but I dunno if the series exists any more.
_________________
Heavy-Metal Spotlight: Reviews of the renowned and the obscure. Most Recently: Nunslaughter - Hell's Unholy Fire
I drum haphazardly in: Nolti Nan Gana Nan Nolta -- "Death By The Venomhammer" EP available on Bandcamp

Top
 Profile  
failsafeman
Digital Dictator

Joined: Wed Sep 01, 2004 8:45 am
Posts: 9547
Location: United States
PostPosted: Tue Dec 18, 2012 1:40 pm 
 

Sure, but it's easy enough to avoid the worst examples. The vast majority of Tintin books have no racism whatsoever. I don't think Tintin in the Congo is even published in America, as it's by far the worst one.
_________________
antonthereaper wrote:
Seriously, why ban me??????? That topic had nothing wrong with it! Theres something wrong with you i can tell you! You're immoral banning of my account! Anyways, i'm creating my own metal arcives.

http://extrememetalencyclopedia.webs.com/

Top
 Profile  
PhilosophicalFrog
The Hypercube

Joined: Thu May 04, 2006 7:08 pm
Posts: 5648
Location: United States
PostPosted: Tue Dec 18, 2012 1:58 pm 
 

Also, it's ridiculous to throw away an entire mythology because of the world-view of the time doesn't match up to ours. Still a fantastic series of adventurous books! Also, Winnie the Pooh is one of the finest books ever written for young minds - you should get it and read it to your child. It's fantastic and perfect.
_________________
BAPTIST - dr((((((((((((( )))))))))))))ne, Meditation, Ambient
I write funny things on twitter

Top
 Profile  
Azmodes
Ultranaut

Joined: Fri Nov 02, 2007 10:44 am
Posts: 5679
Location: Gradec, Austria
PostPosted: Tue Dec 18, 2012 2:03 pm 
 

Finished devouring this today after I had started reading with mild interest last night. Fucking amazing novella. The usual captivating (for me at least) post-human mind-upload carnival, but with some unique takes on key tropes of the "genre" and tightly interwoven considerations of the selfish gene and the consciousness it makes use of. Outright bizarre in places, but grippingly so. Just plain fun to read too.
_________________
theunrelentingattack wrote:
i've whitelisted Whores

Last.fm | Collection

Top
 Profile  
PhilosophicalFrog
The Hypercube

Joined: Thu May 04, 2006 7:08 pm
Posts: 5648
Location: United States
PostPosted: Tue Dec 18, 2012 2:14 pm 
 

ok, after your description and the first things I saw on the page - I'm on it.
_________________
BAPTIST - dr((((((((((((( )))))))))))))ne, Meditation, Ambient
I write funny things on twitter

Top
 Profile  
MazeofTorment
Metalhead

Joined: Mon Feb 07, 2005 11:06 pm
Posts: 2039
Location: United States of America
PostPosted: Tue Dec 18, 2012 2:18 pm 
 

I'll probably be checking out some of those occult works as well. Had my introduction a few months ago when I picked up Qabalah, Qliphoth, and Goetic Magic by Thomas Karlsson. Pretty interesting, cool stuff.
_________________
Sokaris wrote:
I love this board but I'm fucking tired of everyone ejaculating every time someone puts a tree on an album cover.

Top
 Profile  
inhumanist
Metal freak

Joined: Fri Jan 14, 2011 5:09 pm
Posts: 4204
Location: 50 Forts Along The Rhine
PostPosted: Tue Dec 18, 2012 4:02 pm 
 

PhilosophicalFrog wrote:
Also, it's ridiculous to throw away an entire mythology because of the world-view of the time doesn't match up to ours.

We were talking about literature appropriate for children though.
_________________
Celtic Frosted Flakes wrote:
Compared to how it is here in Sweden, fascism sounds like paradise.
Metantoine wrote:
If Summoning is the sugar of fantasy metal, is Manowar the bacon?

Top
 Profile  
andersbang
Metalhead

Joined: Fri Apr 03, 2009 9:28 am
Posts: 666
Location: Denmark
PostPosted: Thu Dec 20, 2012 4:47 am 
 

Read aloud by an adult. Come on.
_________________
That god lives in silence who has scoured the following land with salt and ash.
ralfikk123 wrote:
Music is like a blowjob. Just shut up and enjoy it. However metal is the blowjob given by a hot model.

Top
 Profile  
failsafeman
Digital Dictator

Joined: Wed Sep 01, 2004 8:45 am
Posts: 9547
Location: United States
PostPosted: Thu Dec 20, 2012 5:45 am 
 

Yeah, as long as an adult is there to basically explain "hey, black people aren't like that, Japanese people aren't like that, people just thought racial and national stereotypes were REALLY funny back then," it'd be fine. Herge also backed way off on them as time went on, even going back and obscuring some of them in his older works himself, so the modern editions are generally pretty OK, except for a few doozies.
_________________
antonthereaper wrote:
Seriously, why ban me??????? That topic had nothing wrong with it! Theres something wrong with you i can tell you! You're immoral banning of my account! Anyways, i'm creating my own metal arcives.

http://extrememetalencyclopedia.webs.com/

Top
 Profile  
Grave_Wyrm
Metalhead

Joined: Sun Mar 04, 2012 5:55 pm
Posts: 2022
Location: In the Open Sea
PostPosted: Sat Dec 22, 2012 1:04 pm 
 

When I was reading Tintin, all racistness totally blew past me. Not one Asian or African-American at my elementary school looked like anyone in the books. For that matter, neither did any of the white people. I wasn't raised by racists, so I didn't even know to laugh in mock at the caricatures.

I don't know if kids would actually be interested, but I really liked the Little Nemo comic compendium my brother gave me. That has some oddly drawn (aka: potentially racist, if you insist on that kind of thing) character art.

Top
 Profile  
Dragunov
Metalhead

Joined: Wed Dec 29, 2004 6:34 pm
Posts: 2327
Location: United States of America
PostPosted: Wed Dec 26, 2012 11:46 am 
 

Almost through with A Storm of Swords, so I went ahead and ordered Feast and Dance. I keep hearing I should be prepared to be bored and/or irritated, but hopefully it won't be too bad.
_________________
HamburgerBoy wrote:
Chugging DURDURDUR is more metal than airy lelelelelelelelleele.

Top
 Profile  
AstrumLuciferi
Mallcore Kid

Joined: Wed Dec 26, 2012 4:57 pm
Posts: 4
Location: Switzerland
PostPosted: Wed Dec 26, 2012 5:59 pm 
 

Hello everyone!
I need some recomendation, and I'm sure this is a good forum to ask for it...
I'm looking for a novel similar to what Umberto Eco has done in his Foucault Pendulum (or some of his other works) - something very historical, and that has a very large content (philosophy, esoteric, mythology,... themes, it can have only one of these themes if it is well used). So, the most important aspect for me would be the atmosphere (like in the Name of the Rose) and I'm more into underground (but complex) writers who write about more occult, obscure, esoteric, fantastic themes. The story may deal with anything, from Kaballah, mythology, to philosphy.
Sorry if there are any errors, I'm not used to writing in English, and feel free to ask for any precision.
Thank you.

Top
 Profile  
inhumanist
Metal freak

Joined: Fri Jan 14, 2011 5:09 pm
Posts: 4204
Location: 50 Forts Along The Rhine
PostPosted: Wed Dec 26, 2012 7:09 pm 
 

Frank Herbert's Dune may not seem like an obvious answer but I think it meets most of your requirements. Haven't read Eco though.
_________________
Celtic Frosted Flakes wrote:
Compared to how it is here in Sweden, fascism sounds like paradise.
Metantoine wrote:
If Summoning is the sugar of fantasy metal, is Manowar the bacon?

Top
 Profile  
AstrumLuciferi
Mallcore Kid

Joined: Wed Dec 26, 2012 4:57 pm
Posts: 4
Location: Switzerland
PostPosted: Thu Dec 27, 2012 7:01 am 
 

Thank you inhumanist, Frank Herbert's Dune is not the novel I was looking for but I like the thematics of this one and I'll have to read it. I was maybe looking for something more 'ancient', but thank you though.

Top
 Profile  
Calusari
Metalhead

Joined: Thu Apr 27, 2006 1:36 am
Posts: 707
PostPosted: Thu Dec 27, 2012 7:32 am 
 

They're perhaps a bit different to Eco's work, but you might enjoy Neal Stephenson's Baroque Cycle (in order: 'Quicksilver', 'The Confusion' and 'The System of the World'), Peter Carey's 'The Chemistry of Tears' and Tom McCarthy's 'C'.

EDIT: If you're into philosophy and don't mind science fiction, I'd also recommend Stephenson's 'Anathem' (it's set in a monastery, if that helps, hehe).

Top
 Profile  
TheMizwaOfMuzzyTah
Metalhead

Joined: Tue Feb 09, 2010 2:18 pm
Posts: 1129
PostPosted: Thu Dec 27, 2012 11:36 am 
 

Just cracked open Undoing Yourself with Energized Meditation and Other Devices by Dr. Christopher Hyatt, PHD. Interesting so far, nothing great. Hasn't really gotten into the exercises yet, though.

Top
 Profile  
failsafeman
Digital Dictator

Joined: Wed Sep 01, 2004 8:45 am
Posts: 9547
Location: United States
PostPosted: Thu Dec 27, 2012 2:51 pm 
 

AstrumLuciferi wrote:
Hello everyone!
I need some recomendation, and I'm sure this is a good forum to ask for it...
I'm looking for a novel similar to what Umberto Eco has done in his Foucault Pendulum (or some of his other works) - something very historical, and that has a very large content (philosophy, esoteric, mythology,... themes, it can have only one of these themes if it is well used). So, the most important aspect for me would be the atmosphere (like in the Name of the Rose) and I'm more into underground (but complex) writers who write about more occult, obscure, esoteric, fantastic themes. The story may deal with anything, from Kaballah, mythology, to philosphy.
Sorry if there are any errors, I'm not used to writing in English, and feel free to ask for any precision.
Thank you.

The collected works of Jorge Luis Borges are the answer. He wrote short stories rather than novels, but he absolutely fulfills all of your criteria. Fantastic, philosophical, very historical, esoteric, etc. Very complex, as well.
_________________
antonthereaper wrote:
Seriously, why ban me??????? That topic had nothing wrong with it! Theres something wrong with you i can tell you! You're immoral banning of my account! Anyways, i'm creating my own metal arcives.

http://extrememetalencyclopedia.webs.com/

Top
 Profile  
AstrumLuciferi
Mallcore Kid

Joined: Wed Dec 26, 2012 4:57 pm
Posts: 4
Location: Switzerland
PostPosted: Thu Dec 27, 2012 3:49 pm 
 

Thank you guys! I'll try to read the collected works by Borges as it seems very well written and well-received (maybe I'll begin with Ficciones or The Aleph, the most famous ones), and I think that the format of short stories indeed goes well with what I'm looking for. And I'm also looking forward to reading Stephenson's Anathem, although Baroque seems more representative of 'ancient' philosophy and esoterism (it is difficult to begin with such a great novel: three books...).

Top
 Profile  
failsafeman
Digital Dictator

Joined: Wed Sep 01, 2004 8:45 am
Posts: 9547
Location: United States
PostPosted: Thu Dec 27, 2012 8:45 pm 
 

All of his collected works only end up filling a fairly brief volume, it sounds like way more than it is. There are tons of single novels longer than everything he wrote in his entire life. He was just very very good at packing in tons of meaning into a very small space; some of his stories are barely a couple of pages long.
_________________
antonthereaper wrote:
Seriously, why ban me??????? That topic had nothing wrong with it! Theres something wrong with you i can tell you! You're immoral banning of my account! Anyways, i'm creating my own metal arcives.

http://extrememetalencyclopedia.webs.com/

Top
 Profile  
TheMizwaOfMuzzyTah
Metalhead

Joined: Tue Feb 09, 2010 2:18 pm
Posts: 1129
PostPosted: Wed Jan 02, 2013 6:39 pm 
 

So, the Hyatt book was a bit goofy. For as much as I respect his intelligence and good humor, it was basically just a compilation of various methods Crowley and other yogis have recorded over the years reiterated in his obnoxious writing style. I've gotten results using these methods, but the way the book is executed does nothing for me. I much prefer Crowley's purple prose, as someone else on this board aptly described it.

I've started The Walls Came Tumbling Down, which is a screenplay Robert Anton Wilson wrote that never made it into production. Very good, thus far. Wish it had been filmed. The way Wilson writes screenplays is very similar to the way I write them.

I've got a lot of books stacked up to read, and I'm not sure where to go after here. I could keep on the RAW train (easy to do) with Quantum Psychology or The New Inquisition, but I'm pretty sure I've burned myself out on him for a while.

I'd really like to read a novel I could happily get lost in. Heavy reading is fun but can be exhausting. At least for me. Has anyone read The Dice Man by Luke Reinhart or whatever his name is?

Top
 Profile  
Aquarius
Metalhead

Joined: Wed Jan 17, 2007 11:17 am
Posts: 587
Location: Czech Republic
PostPosted: Thu Jan 03, 2013 9:58 am 
 

Today I have finished reading Helpless by Barbara Gowdy in English and I liked that book a lot. It is very captivating story from my point of view, I recommend.
I enjoy reading books in English language, however difficult they are.
_________________
Zbohatlíci zbohatlí, na čem jste to zbohatli?
My Space

Top
 Profile  
Jonpo
Hypercolombowler

Joined: Tue Jul 31, 2007 10:05 am
Posts: 4383
PostPosted: Thu Jan 03, 2013 6:34 pm 
 

I was at a loss for more music to order with my amazon gift card so I decided to splurge on my favorite author, the illustrious Jack Vance. Here's what I came away with:

Nopalgarth (The whole series in one edition. Contains: Nopalgarth, Son of the Tree, and The Houses of Iszm)

The Asutra (This is the conclusion of the Durdane trilogy. I read the first two about a year ago and never got around to ordering the third. Probably going to start from the beginning as I remember being very endeared to Gastel Etzwane's drama)

Big Planet and Showboat World (These are part of the same story I guess? I read a very brief description of "Big Planet" and it sounded exactly like the kind of setting Vance could stretch out in. Crash land on a hostile planet...fight for survival/escape)

The Languages of Pao

Suldrun's Garden, Madouc, and The Green Pearl (The legendary Lyonesse trilogy. I've already read these three in a digital copy but that's just not proper. Looking forward to re-reading this one once the paperbacks show up. Definitely his most "sword and sorcery" series but it's got that engimatic Vancian touch in the cultures/characters/dialogue.)

Araminta Station and Ecce and Old Earth (Books 1 and 2 of the Cadwal Chronicles. Unfortunately the third one, Throy, was way too expensive so I'm hoping to pick that up later. No real clue what this series is about but I have a lot of faith, obviously.)

Marune, Wyst, and Trullion (The Alastor series! This is probably his most well-known work that I haven't read yet. Once again I haven't even bothered to get an idea what the story is about. I've got a distinct feeling it will involve long voyages with disparate characters and the most colorful cultures imaginable.)

The Dragon Masters and The Five Gold Bands (Two stand-alone novels, issued in a double-pack for the miserly among us. I haven't read many stand-alone works by Vance outside of The Blue World. I'm expecting these to be incredibly punchy and colorful. I think one or the other is a HUGO winner, not that that means much to me really.)

So there it is! I can't wait for some of these to start showing up. If he has a substandard work to his name I'm about to find it.
_________________
I'm livin' for givin' the Devil his due...

Top
 Profile  
Thiestru
Metalhead

Joined: Thu Oct 09, 2008 9:18 am
Posts: 1109
Location: United States
PostPosted: Thu Jan 03, 2013 6:55 pm 
 

Don't forget to raise a glass in memory of Prof. J. R. R. Tolkien tonight, as it's his birthday. Wassail!

Top
 Profile  
inhumanist
Metal freak

Joined: Fri Jan 14, 2011 5:09 pm
Posts: 4204
Location: 50 Forts Along The Rhine
PostPosted: Thu Jan 03, 2013 7:39 pm 
 

It's still the third in England so here's to John Ronald Reuel's 11². :beer:
I'm reading the Silmarillion and I am enjoying it greatly. As a work of original Mythology it is impressive. And despite its (for lack of a better word, I know that means something else) epic style of narration it is touching like little else.
_________________
Celtic Frosted Flakes wrote:
Compared to how it is here in Sweden, fascism sounds like paradise.
Metantoine wrote:
If Summoning is the sugar of fantasy metal, is Manowar the bacon?

Top
 Profile  
bloodycumshit
Metalhead

Joined: Sat Sep 15, 2012 11:10 pm
Posts: 492
Location: New Zealand
PostPosted: Fri Jan 04, 2013 12:45 am 
 

Just like to say thanks to STORM for the recommendation "The way of the wyrd" by Brian Bates.Obviously i haven't read it yet' but the summary for the story sounds like just what i was looking for.I also noticed he had another book that looked interesting too "THE REAL MIDDLE EARTH: MAGIC & MYSTERY IN THE DARK AGES" .

Top
 Profile  
Nahsil
Clerical Sturmgeschütz

Joined: Sun Jan 08, 2006 2:06 pm
Posts: 3724
Location: United States
PostPosted: Fri Jan 04, 2013 11:47 am 
 

Currently reading The Wisdom of Insecurity by Alan Watts, which does a great job of summing up his views (principally modern adaptations of Hinduism and Buddhism). It and The Way of Zen are my favorites of his.

Also started Slaughterhouse Five, which I hadn't gotten around to.
_________________
and we are born
from the same womb
and hewn from
the same stone - Primordial, "Heathen Tribes"

Top
 Profile  
Calusari
Metalhead

Joined: Thu Apr 27, 2006 1:36 am
Posts: 707
PostPosted: Fri Jan 04, 2013 11:55 am 
 

I absolutely love 'Slaughterhouse 5'; it was the first Vonnegut I read, and remains one of my favourite novels of all time.

Top
 Profile  
ScandalfTheShite
Metal newbie

Joined: Sun Oct 21, 2012 10:46 am
Posts: 392
Location: Finland
PostPosted: Fri Jan 04, 2013 11:57 am 
 

Has anyone got any information on a writer named Adobe James? I got this collection of horror stories that has his novel "The Road to Mictlantecutli" on it. It's a some sort of an illustration of the Aztecs' kingdom of the dead. Very powerful and inspired story, one of my all time favourites. The internet doesn't seem to know much about him, and I'm very curious if he has written something else too. Any help would be appreciated.
_________________
Give me the mustard, you bastard!

Top
 Profile  
Empyreal
The Final Frontier

Joined: Thu Nov 30, 2006 6:58 pm
Posts: 18741
Location: Where the dead rule the night
PostPosted: Fri Jan 04, 2013 11:58 am 
 

@Calusari: Same here. It's a really great example of a war commentary turned into something very individualistic and entertaining even outside of the satire and political ramifications of it. I also really love Cat's Cradle's angle on the atomic bomb/end of the world scenario (even relevant today, really) and a lot of the stories in Welcome to the Monkey House are amazing. Shame I haven't gotten to read more Vonnegut lately due to schoolwork and etc.
_________________
Cinema Freaks latest reviews: Robin Williams Tribute, Ender's Game

Top
 Profile  
Calusari
Metalhead

Joined: Thu Apr 27, 2006 1:36 am
Posts: 707
PostPosted: Fri Jan 04, 2013 12:08 pm 
 

Yeah, Cat's Cradle is quite stunning. I haven't had the time to read as much Vonnegut as I'd like to, either; I really want to explore his short stories, finally.

I think the last book of his that I read was 'Hocus Pocus', which doesn't seem to get a lot of critical attention; I really enjoyed it, actually - it's a work of poignant, crazy brilliance.

Top
 Profile  
TheMizwaOfMuzzyTah
Metalhead

Joined: Tue Feb 09, 2010 2:18 pm
Posts: 1129
PostPosted: Fri Jan 04, 2013 1:09 pm 
 

@ Nahsil:
I liked that one, too. I have yet to read The Way of Zen, though. Will probably do so soon.

The only Vonnegut I've read is Slapstick, which I enjoyed immensely.

Top
 Profile  
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Reply to topic Go to page Previous  1 ... 73, 74, 75, 76, 77, 78, 79 ... 100  Next


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Gastjale, henkkjelle, StainedClass95, Woolie_Wool and 8 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  

Back to the Encyclopaedia Metallum


Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group