Encyclopaedia Metallum: The Metal Archives

Message board

* FAQ    * Search   * Register   * Login 



Reply to topic  
Author Message Previous topic | Next topic
ginometalhead
Metal newbie

Joined: Wed Apr 22, 2009 4:36 pm
Posts: 92
Location: United States of America
PostPosted: Tue Feb 14, 2012 12:32 am 
 

I am trying to evoke a sad atmosphere, so when I'm tremolo picking an E chord I would play the key tone (i.e. synth pad) at a G? That's three half steps up from the note you're picking, right? I assume I follow this method for the entire duration of my song which is composed in E minor. Any other recommendations on creating that dismal, depressive atmosphere?

Top
 Profile  
Suffersystem
Metalhead

Joined: Thu Mar 24, 2011 2:31 pm
Posts: 922
Location: United States
PostPosted: Tue Feb 14, 2012 1:02 am 
 

what genre?
_________________
Tumblr / Last.fm
Xa'ligha - Lovecraftian Dark Ambient
CorpseFister wrote:
Also, that vocal recording pic confirmed what I suspected: SLK records shirtless in a sweaty caveman-like delirium. You can almost hear the man stink in the recordings.

Top
 Profile  
awheio
Metal newbie

Joined: Tue Jul 05, 2011 2:00 am
Posts: 284
Location: United States
PostPosted: Tue Feb 14, 2012 1:12 am 
 

It's much more complicated than just that. The initial rule of thumb is that you should stay mostly in key. This means that you won't always be playing minor intervals (playing the G with the E is a minor interval 'cause the G is the 3rd in the E minor scale). For example, if you want to move from the E to a G chord (which you might want to do, since going to the minor third could work), you might want to have that G be major! Not only will it keep you in key, but the contrast between the majors and the minors will make the minors really stand out, especially you somehow emphasize the underlying E-minor structure. Of course, these are just rules of thumb: The only way to really find out is to just experiment a lot! Of course, learning the various parts of a sad song will help you see how others do it -- what works etc. You don't even need to learn them -- just download a good GuitarPro tab, for example, and look at the parts, how they flow, interlock, etc.

Top
 Profile  
ginometalhead
Metal newbie

Joined: Wed Apr 22, 2009 4:36 pm
Posts: 92
Location: United States of America
PostPosted: Tue Feb 14, 2012 1:18 am 
 

Suffersystem wrote:
what genre?

ambient black metal

Top
 Profile  
Suffersystem
Metalhead

Joined: Thu Mar 24, 2011 2:31 pm
Posts: 922
Location: United States
PostPosted: Tue Feb 14, 2012 1:22 am 
 

ginometalhead wrote:
Suffersystem wrote:
what genre?

ambient black metal

then lots of reverb on the vocals.
hahahahha sorry man thats kind of all i can think of, but it really does help with the atmosphere. but then again i dont listen to abm so idek if vox are in it
_________________
Tumblr / Last.fm
Xa'ligha - Lovecraftian Dark Ambient
CorpseFister wrote:
Also, that vocal recording pic confirmed what I suspected: SLK records shirtless in a sweaty caveman-like delirium. You can almost hear the man stink in the recordings.

Top
 Profile  
ginometalhead
Metal newbie

Joined: Wed Apr 22, 2009 4:36 pm
Posts: 92
Location: United States of America
PostPosted: Tue Feb 14, 2012 1:27 am 
 

awheio wrote:
It's much more complicated than just that. The initial rule of thumb is that you should stay mostly in key. This means that you won't always be playing minor intervals (playing the G with the E is a minor interval 'cause the G is the 3rd in the E minor scale). For example, if you want to move from the E to a G chord (which you might want to do, since going to the minor third could work), you might want to have that G be major! Not only will it keep you in key, but the contrast between the majors and the minors will make the minors really stand out, especially you somehow emphasize the underlying E-minor structure. Of course, these are just rules of thumb: The only way to really find out is to just experiment a lot! Of course, learning the various parts of a sad song will help you see how others do it -- what works etc. You don't even need to learn them -- just download a good GuitarPro tab, for example, and look at the parts, how they flow, interlock, etc.


Hmmm...I knew it had to be more complex than what I was thinking. It makes sense. Staying in key is first and foremost of importance. If I'm moving up 3 half steps on every tremolo picked chord, I will eventually run into some that do not flow accurately. Guitar pro it is.

Top
 Profile  
Zodijackyl
Lazy Wizard

Joined: Wed Apr 30, 2008 5:39 pm
Posts: 4918
Location: United States
PostPosted: Tue Feb 14, 2012 1:56 am 
 

ginometalhead wrote:
awheio wrote:
It's much more complicated than just that. The initial rule of thumb is that you should stay mostly in key. This means that you won't always be playing minor intervals (playing the G with the E is a minor interval 'cause the G is the 3rd in the E minor scale). For example, if you want to move from the E to a G chord (which you might want to do, since going to the minor third could work), you might want to have that G be major! Not only will it keep you in key, but the contrast between the majors and the minors will make the minors really stand out, especially you somehow emphasize the underlying E-minor structure. Of course, these are just rules of thumb: The only way to really find out is to just experiment a lot! Of course, learning the various parts of a sad song will help you see how others do it -- what works etc. You don't even need to learn them -- just download a good GuitarPro tab, for example, and look at the parts, how they flow, interlock, etc.


Hmmm...I knew it had to be more complex than what I was thinking. It makes sense. Staying in key is first and foremost of importance. If I'm moving up 3 half steps on every tremolo picked chord, I will eventually run into some that do not flow accurately. Guitar pro it is.


While staying in a minor key, you will play some major chords. To maintain the sad mood, resolve from major chords back to minor chords. Emphasize the minor chords and the minor thirds, and while you can move to other intervals, resolving back to minor rather than moving major to major helps keep this. You can also shift to minor modes other than aeolian, emphasizing the first and third. This allows for more variation while keeping you from getting stuck playing Em all the time.

Any sort of rules/guidelines are soft - they're not binding, they're just suggestions and you can certainly break them if you manage to work it into the composition as a whole.

Top
 Profile  
ginometalhead
Metal newbie

Joined: Wed Apr 22, 2009 4:36 pm
Posts: 92
Location: United States of America
PostPosted: Tue Feb 14, 2012 3:58 pm 
 

awheio wrote:
It's much more complicated than just that. The initial rule of thumb is that you should stay mostly in key. This means that you won't always be playing minor intervals (playing the G with the E is a minor interval 'cause the G is the 3rd in the E minor scale). For example, if you want to move from the E to a G chord (which you might want to do, since going to the minor third could work), you might want to have that G be major! Not only will it keep you in key, but the contrast between the majors and the minors will make the minors really stand out, especially you somehow emphasize the underlying E-minor structure. Of course, these are just rules of thumb: The only way to really find out is to just experiment a lot! Of course, learning the various parts of a sad song will help you see how others do it -- what works etc. You don't even need to learn them -- just download a good GuitarPro tab, for example, and look at the parts, how they flow, interlock, etc.


I think I should mention that I'm a guitarist, and am driven to become more of a complete musician. That being said, I am still learning when it comes to composition. I am also trying to familiarize myself with musical terminology. Seven years of playing guitar and I am ready to write and record a proper demo of the ambient black metal persuasion. I have my guitar, bass, drum machine, mic, and keyboard all set. Now I just need to tighten my grasp in the composition. Any other pointers would be appreciated.

Top
 Profile  
Pfuntner
Metalhead

Joined: Wed Jul 19, 2006 9:33 pm
Posts: 1096
Location: United States of America
PostPosted: Wed Feb 15, 2012 12:25 am 
 

Repetition can do a lot for you. Zodijackyl gave a lot of really good advice. Reverb is also wonderful for this sort of stuff.
_________________
Random Child : http://randomchild.bandcamp.com/

Top
 Profile  
awheio
Metal newbie

Joined: Tue Jul 05, 2011 2:00 am
Posts: 284
Location: United States
PostPosted: Wed Feb 15, 2012 9:48 am 
 

And do try out different kinds of chords! E.g. try adding the 2nd/9th to the chord -- as when playing your normal E-minor chord but fretting the F# on the high E string. Or throw in some 6ths, either with or without the 5ths. It can produce some great tension, I think, to play something like an A-minor chord, then fret the F on the high E -- gives you something like the minor 6th vibe, but it gets very dissonant with the lower E you're playing (above the A) and it's terrific. Just experiment. If you've got that many years, I'm sure you've run into some stranger shapes than these.

Top
 Profile  
ArtificialStupidity
Metalhead

Joined: Wed Apr 07, 2010 10:07 am
Posts: 673
Location: Finland, Kuopio
PostPosted: Wed Feb 15, 2012 12:53 pm 
 

Extending the tertian structure of minor chords usually gets the desired sad sounding feel. Also try to build many chords on the same bass note. This is called pedal tone and it really helps you to hear the chord-scale harmonies, for instance E phrygian mode as Em7(b9,11,b13).
_________________
NecroFile wrote:
Lars Ulrich used to post under the name Anal_Gladiator but then he got banned. Dude, if you break the rules you get kicked off the forum. We don't care how many Grammies you have.

Top
 Profile  
Syntek
Metalhead

Joined: Mon Sep 13, 2010 1:14 pm
Posts: 615
Location: United Kingdom
PostPosted: Fri Feb 17, 2012 6:39 am 
 

Some straightforward 4/4 chord progressions I can recommend (each chord is worth a bar/4 beats):

1a) B | C#/Db | D | A#/Bb (creates a sense of impending doom)

OR alternatively:

1b) B | C#/Db | D | E
1c) B | C#/Db | D | F#/Gb
1d) B | C#/Db | D | F (very doomy)

2) D#/Eb* | G | A#/Bb | F (this sounds more triumphant than sad, but makes a good contrast; requires good leads for any effect)

*can be substituted with an F

3a) C | (lower) G | G#/Ab | F
3b) C | (lower) G | G#/Ab | E

4) F | D | E (hold 2 beats)
5) D | F | F# (hold 2 beats)
6) C | C#/Db | D#/Eb | E
7) F | E | C#/Db (hold 2 beats)

These work far more effectively with leads, and when applied correctly and tastefully are fairly fool-proof. Remember that these can all be transposed to fit nicely together. IMO it's the ground bass (and often in black metal the body of the piece) that affects the mood the most.

Top
 Profile  
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Reply to topic


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 6 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  

Back to the Encyclopaedia Metallum


Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group