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Det_Morkettall
Metalhead

Joined: Wed Dec 29, 2010 12:02 am
Posts: 610
Location: Canada
PostPosted: Thu Jan 26, 2012 7:15 pm 
 

This is an idea that came to me a little while ago, but only recently have I taken the initiative to search the subforum to see if it's already been done.

Basically, in this thread, we would direct any of our programmed drum related stuff into the reply box and get the help anyone may need. Though the title does say programmed drums, I meant this thread to also cover resampling, replacing, sharing samples, etc., so we should also talk about that too.

For all those new to Drum Software, let me explain it:

DEFINITION
~ Drum programming is the use of samples arranged either by playing with triggers, triggering software, or arranging manually with drum samples to replicate having a live drummer. Since various factors could leave people without the option of using traditionally recorded drums, this is an often used method of adding drums.

IMPORTANT THINGS TO REMEMBER
~ The current standard in drum programming technology is to have MIDI-compatible VSTi plugins do the triggering and sampling.
~ Many famous metal bands opt to use drum triggering on their records (along with great samples).
~ Generally, to use the MIDI-compatible plugins, you need to generate MIDI in a different program. A free option is to download TuxGuitar and learn the notes for certain kit pieces.

WELL KNOWN PROGRAMS/SOFTWARE

~ Beatcraft Acoustica (this program is able to build patterns one by one and allow you to arrange them however you'd want. Unfortunately, the samples aren't very realistic or versatile)

~ Toontrack EZDrummer (this one is especially popular in the metal scene for its Drumkit From Hell expansion, which features samples that would be much better suited to heavy types of music than anything else. The samples are nice for the price, but they're not great by any means; resampling will fix this.)

~ Toontrack Superior Drummer (not as popular as EZDrummer, though I can't see why. The samples far exceed those of EZDrummer, as there's more mixing options in regards to how each track sounds with each other, and the options for customization are incredibly diverse. It can take a while to learn how to use it, but once it's been learned, you'll realize this is the closest you'll get to having realistic sounding programmed drums. Comes with hundreds of different samples, a humanizer, effects, a mixer, and the ability to route the tracks out into a DAW)

~XLN Addictive Drums (The cymbal samples here are among the best stock samples I've ever heard! They're really meaty and sound extremely realistic, as opposed to Toontrack's sub-par cymbal samples. Unfortunately, there is no humanizer built in, and its MIDI-mapping is radically different and much harder to learn than Toontrack's. Those are the only two hindering qualities of the software).

The above are all paid software, but there are... alternative methods. (NOTE: M-A AND ITS MODS DO NOT CONDONE PIRACY)

SAMPLES

Another important aspect of drum programming is the use of samples. Samples are basically different high-end kit pieces that are recorded with moderate-to-high quality equipment and methods, usually used to make drum programming possible. However, since many companies record their own samples, they include samples in their programs already. An option to change this is to replace the drum kit pieces with better, meatier samples of your choosing.

That's all for now. I'll add more later.
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Awblaster
Metalhead

Joined: Mon Feb 08, 2010 6:07 pm
Posts: 474
Location: United Kingdom
PostPosted: Thu Jan 26, 2012 8:17 pm 
 

I would recommend the Metalheads expansion for EZ Drummer. It's sampled off Tomas Haake from Meshuggah's kit, and it sounds really good for heavy stuff, and it's just a bit different from the DfH sounds. With a bit of EQ, it's possible to make it sound really different as well, so I find it pretty versatile.

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Menschenfeindlic
Metal newbie

Joined: Sun Jan 25, 2009 7:05 am
Posts: 256
Location: Syria
PostPosted: Fri Jan 27, 2012 8:13 am 
 

I use Addictive Drums, I can get good sound for snare and kick, but I haven't settled down on a good sound for the cymbals.
the preset I use is in the attachments...it was basically a modified version from a preset I downloaded from guitarampmodeling.com forums, I don't recall the name of the member who made it.
you'll need two tracks for this preset, in first track load the preset a1 and in the second one load a2.
I think AD has a built in humanizer...anyway i usually use reaper to 'humanize' the snare track and make the snare volume a bit quieter where there is blasbeating.
For the MIDI mapping, it has become much easier to use AD with guitar pro in version 1.5.
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CorpseFister
Metalhead

Joined: Mon Apr 21, 2008 2:07 pm
Posts: 2009
Location: Canada
PostPosted: Fri Jan 27, 2012 11:40 am 
 

Your post requires clarification. Triggering is not the same thing as programming. It involves a real drum performance. Sensors translate a drummers hits into electric signals which then trigger drum samples. The cost of buying either triggers or a quality electronic drum kit, plus the skill level required to play, will prove a significant barrier to many amateur musicians.

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garthmargengi
Metalhead

Joined: Tue Nov 01, 2011 7:16 am
Posts: 482
Location: Argentina
PostPosted: Fri Jan 27, 2012 12:08 pm 
 

Well, since I've already explained this several times, and to save myself from repeating the same in the future, quick first steps into programming drums for newbies:

-First you need a DAW, that's a Digital Audio Workstation, the place where you're setting everything up. The drum sampler/synth will need a host software in order to work in most cases, that's what the DAW is for.
Well known ones are Reaper and Cubase for example, but whichever is your choice, make sure it supports MIDI writing and editing.
-When you're installing the DAW, it will ask you to set up a VST folder, PAY ATTENTION HERE, you need to remember where you're placing that folder.

-Second, now we've got to seach the drums, you should look for a VSTi (Virtual Studio Tech instrument), it can either be a sampler (a software that uses recorded sounds) or a synthesizer (generates them digitally, so to speak), whatever suit your needs. An easy one to start is EZdrummer, not the best sound ever, but it's pretty simple and there are lots of tutorials around the net, but do some research to see what fits you best.
-VSTis rarely work as standalones, and even if they do, they aren't really meant to write down the music, this is why you need the host/DAW. Now, when installing the VSTi, it will ask you to locate that VST folder you set up in the first step, this will place a .dll inside it, which is the file the DAW needs to read in order to open the VSTi.

-All installed? Good, now open your DAW, add a MIDI track, load the VSTi drums in it, open the piano roll/score/MIDI editor and start writing. Can't give much specifics here because it all depends in which host and sampler you're using, but remember: GOOGLE AND YOUTUBE ARE YOUR FRIENDS, when in doubt, just SEARCH, lots of people went already thru those first steps and through the same troubles you might be facing now, there are tons of tutorials and tips around the net to be found, if you're stuck, just open the explorer and start reading.
Problems understanding any terms in specific, want further explanation on any given subject? There's also wikipedia for that.
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MrTubefox
Metalhead

Joined: Wed Aug 11, 2010 6:37 pm
Posts: 564
PostPosted: Tue Jan 31, 2012 5:18 pm 
 

I'd recommend adding Hydrogen to your list of programs. It's pretty good, and it's free.
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Nightwisher1990
Metalhead

Joined: Wed Nov 18, 2009 6:26 pm
Posts: 480
PostPosted: Wed Feb 01, 2012 5:10 am 
 

I use addictive drums with metal pack extension the whole thing is really good but it's really not easy to learn it fast, anyway, I've tot used to it, everything in AD is good except snare samples, even the one in metal pack isn't that good, I've made my own map for AD using same mapping that guitar pro 5 uses with this I can write everything on guitar pro.
As for humanization, I use reaper's midi humanizer to humanize the whole kit using more humanization on snare and toms, but anyway, I havn't used this with any of my musical or mixing projects.

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Misfit74
Metalhead

Joined: Fri Aug 05, 2011 1:23 am
Posts: 1590
Location: United States
PostPosted: Thu Feb 02, 2012 3:38 pm 
 

I'm getting used to Addictive Drums and it appears to be one of the more user-friendly, intuitive progs out there. I actually like the snares ok, but the double-bass drums are excellent sounding. I haven't yet gotten to the point where I can utilize many of my own creations, so I'll be monitoring this thread as I travel further into it.
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Saskatu
Metal newbie

Joined: Fri Mar 26, 2010 2:29 am
Posts: 34
PostPosted: Mon Feb 06, 2012 10:37 pm 
 

If you want the most bang for your buck, I would highly recommend Steven Slate Drums (SSD). The customization for the drums is arguably more dynamic and easier to use than Superior Drums, and much better customer support. Go to into Google and look up more information for SSD.

My only complaint is the price for the platinum addition (which comes with 100 drum kits) is 300 USD.

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Misfit74
Metalhead

Joined: Fri Aug 05, 2011 1:23 am
Posts: 1590
Location: United States
PostPosted: Tue Feb 07, 2012 1:48 am 
 

Saskatu wrote:
If you want the most bang for your buck, I would highly recommend Steven Slate Drums (SSD). The customization for the drums is arguably more dynamic and easier to use than Superior Drums, and much better customer support. Go to into Google and look up more information for SSD.

My only complaint is the price for the platinum addition (which comes with 100 drum kits) is 300 USD.


That's kind of the issue I have with all these programs. I don't need 50,000 drum kits or samples or 25,000 ways to tweak 15,000 different snares. I need to easily lay down my own tracks or piece together drum parts using the program along with my DAW. The sound variety is always a major selling point by these companies and honestly that interests me the least. Heck, 5 good kits and ease of use would be key for me.
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MrDisgrace
Metal newbie

Joined: Sun Dec 04, 2011 3:11 pm
Posts: 34
Location: Brazil
PostPosted: Tue Feb 07, 2012 7:50 am 
 

I use Superior Drummer 2.0. It's soooo good! I can get most of the sounds I want out of it - I've used it on grindcore, black metal and shoegazy songs I made. Really versatile. I used EZdrummer once too but didn't really fancy it.
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DisciplineOfRevenge
Metal newbie

Joined: Sat Sep 03, 2011 10:33 pm
Posts: 66
PostPosted: Wed Feb 08, 2012 3:16 pm 
 

what's a good drum machine software that's free that works for windows?

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Saskatu
Metal newbie

Joined: Fri Mar 26, 2010 2:29 am
Posts: 34
PostPosted: Wed Feb 08, 2012 4:30 pm 
 

Misfit74 wrote:
Saskatu wrote:
If you want the most bang for your buck, I would highly recommend Steven Slate Drums (SSD). The customization for the drums is arguably more dynamic and easier to use than Superior Drums, and much better customer support. Go to into Google and look up more information for SSD.

My only complaint is the price for the platinum addition (which comes with 100 drum kits) is 300 USD.


That's kind of the issue I have with all these programs. I don't need 50,000 drum kits or samples or 25,000 ways to tweak 15,000 different snares. I need to easily lay down my own tracks or piece together drum parts using the program along with my DAW. The sound variety is always a major selling point by these companies and honestly that interests me the least. Heck, 5 good kits and ease of use would be key for me.

SSD and about every single drum software that comes with an interface allows MIDI programming. The band Soilwork substituted a lot of parts in their latest album, The Panic Broadcast, with Superior Drummer and they kept it to a minimum for their drum sounds. I can understand where you're getting at about using these softwares, but they were created for the convenience of not needing a real drummer and you can create a drum track in a matter of minutes.

Also, I agree about not needing too many kits except greed takes over most of the time. :P

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