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CorpseFister
Metalhead

Joined: Mon Apr 21, 2008 2:07 pm
Posts: 1883
Location: Canada
PostPosted: Fri Aug 10, 2012 11:25 am 
 

An Alesis mixer eh? Something like this, connected via USB?

http://www.alesis.com/multimix6usb

Plugging directly into a stock soundcard usually doesn’t work out so well, but a mixer/interface that connects via USB should probably be enough.

What’s the output meter on the mixer look like as you are playing? The meter should be well into the greens or yellows before it gets to your computer. If not then the problem is either that the input or output levels on the mixer are not high enough. Aside from turning up the main volume, there should be a separate input knob for each channel you can plug into, so make sure those are up.

Assuming you are trying to record guitar see if there is a small line/guitar switch on any of the channels. Guitars put out pretty small signals on their own, so recording into a line level channel might not produce a high enough signal. You should probably have at least one channel that can be switched to a high impedance input for guitars.

Those are probably the simplest suggestions. If the output meter is running high, then the problem is likely computer/software related. Oh, if there is no LED lights or display for the output meter you should be able to plug your headphones/stereo into a monitor jack to see how loud the device is outputting (it should be quite audible). And if none of that sounds like your device maybe post up the mixer you’ve got.

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Grave_Wyrm
Metalhead

Joined: Sun Mar 04, 2012 5:55 pm
Posts: 2043
PostPosted: Mon Aug 13, 2012 4:01 pm 
 

I have a 16 channel version of that one (firewire). I'll run some tests today and see. Thanks. You've probably answered my question. It's very likely that input knob .. just have to rtfm.

edit: just to clarify, I'm trying to record the amp through a microphone, not the guitar straight into the mixer. I doubt it matters, but .. fyi.

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Grave_Wyrm
Metalhead

Joined: Sun Mar 04, 2012 5:55 pm
Posts: 2043
PostPosted: Tue Aug 14, 2012 11:13 pm 
 

Yeah, it was the gain knob on the mic's channel. It's just weird that it has to be turned up so high. Maybe that's because my amp is too quiet .. but I can't play much louder. Thanks!

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dontlivefastjustdie
Metalhead

Joined: Thu Jun 18, 2009 3:16 pm
Posts: 2105
Location: Hotlanta, USA
PostPosted: Fri Sep 28, 2012 4:24 pm 
 

ok, so I've got garageband on my powerbook g4, a bass rig, a 4 channel PA (one of the transportable Fender ones), mics/cables, and my bass. what else do I need in order to record some bass tracks onto my laptop?

I've played in bands for a decade but don't have any home recording experience beyond using one of those BOSS 16 track "all in one" recorders so any insight would be incredibly helpful.
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infinitenexus
Metalhead

Joined: Tue Jan 22, 2008 2:35 am
Posts: 1939
PostPosted: Sun Oct 28, 2012 11:47 pm 
 

All you need to record bass is a bass, an audio interface, and your laptop. You could get a 1/4" -> 1/8" adapter and plug your bass right into the mic jack on your computer and record that way, but it will sound kinda crappy.
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Xenokrist
Metal newbie

Joined: Sun Oct 21, 2012 1:03 am
Posts: 56
Location: United States
PostPosted: Sat Dec 01, 2012 11:57 pm 
 

Hey guys, I'm hoping you can help me out here.

I've been wanting to do my own Opeth-like electric-acoustic metal project, and I need to know what I'll need to start it off. It's going to be low-budget, because I'm one broke motherfucker. What I have right now is an Epiphone Les Paul studio guitar, a Fender Stratocaster (that I'll be using for the clean parts), a Fender Mustang II amp that hooks up to my computer through a USB cord with a Marshall footswitch hooked up to it, Fender Fuse for all of my effects, a webcam microphone, and Ableton Live 8 for putting all the tracks down.

For the drum tracks I'm planning to use Acoustica Beatcraft as a drum machine. The bass is a Fender Affinity Precision Bass, and it's gonna be running through the same amp, the Mustang II (I know, bad idea, but I'm broke, okay?).

What else I need to know is how to avoid getting feedback on my microphone, and just how to make it sound good in general. I've pretty much learned how to lay down tracks in Ableton Live 8, so I'll need no assistance there.

Thank you \m/

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Zodijackyl
Lazy Wizard

Joined: Wed Apr 30, 2008 5:39 pm
Posts: 4799
Location: United States
PostPosted: Sun Dec 02, 2012 1:09 am 
 

slayerdeicide666 wrote:
Hey guys, I'm hoping you can help me out here.

I've been wanting to do my own Opeth-like electric-acoustic metal project, and I need to know what I'll need to start it off. It's going to be low-budget, because I'm one broke motherfucker. What I have right now is an Epiphone Les Paul studio guitar, a Fender Stratocaster (that I'll be using for the clean parts), a Fender Mustang II amp that hooks up to my computer through a USB cord with a Marshall footswitch hooked up to it, Fender Fuse for all of my effects, a webcam microphone, and Ableton Live 8 for putting all the tracks down.

For the drum tracks I'm planning to use Acoustica Beatcraft as a drum machine. The bass is a Fender Affinity Precision Bass, and it's gonna be running through the same amp, the Mustang II (I know, bad idea, but I'm broke, okay?).

What else I need to know is how to avoid getting feedback on my microphone, and just how to make it sound good in general. I've pretty much learned how to lay down tracks in Ableton Live 8, so I'll need no assistance there.

Thank you \m/


A webcam microphone is not going to cut it. A cheap USB microphone is better - you can find microphones from the game Rock Band really cheap (especially in thrift stores) and those are serviceable if you're on a tight budget. It's also pretty easy to find someone you know with one that can be borrowed. Better microphones are great, but an interface that can handle them is going to set you back a bit, and even a $30 microphone with an XLR plug, a cable, and a $25 XLR-to-USB adapter is enough of an expense that you might as well put that towards a ~$99 interface.

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BoxCar Willy
Mallcore Kid

Joined: Thu Dec 06, 2012 6:05 pm
Posts: 18
Location: Canada
PostPosted: Sun Dec 09, 2012 1:12 am 
 

Really interesting read, I've gain quite a bit of knowledge from this that will definitely improve my recording process. Right now my guitar tracks are done by placing a Rockband mic on a sock in front of my amp :P

I'm quite surprised at the quality though, it impresses me that such a shitty mic sounds fairly clear and crisp.

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infinitenexus
Metalhead

Joined: Tue Jan 22, 2008 2:35 am
Posts: 1939
PostPosted: Sat Dec 15, 2012 10:41 pm 
 

When you say on a sock, do you mean putting a sock over the mic, to act as a pop filter? If so, you don't need that for guitar. Socks work pretty well for vocals though, and I've used one before. If you mean putting it directly on the sock, like using the sock for a mic stand, then forget what I said.
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xThe__Wizard
Metalhead

Joined: Sun Nov 18, 2012 2:59 pm
Posts: 845
PostPosted: Sun Dec 16, 2012 2:39 pm 
 

So I'm going to try and purchase some stuff for recording my stuff as well as my friends if need be. Mostly noise/ambient, grindcore, rock and roll, punk, etc. Just trying to figure out what I need. I'm getting a decent laptop for xmas so I got to figure out what DAW I want. I just have a few questions that hopefully some of you can answer for me.

I will need an interface first for recording instruments but I really don't know much about them. I would like 4 inputs for drums but I doubt I will have enough money for that and would be okay with 2. Any reccomendations?

Also I will need mics but I don't really know much about mics either. What different kinds of mics are there and which are good for recording?

If someone could answer these questions I will be grateful.
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infinitenexus
Metalhead

Joined: Tue Jan 22, 2008 2:35 am
Posts: 1939
PostPosted: Sat Dec 22, 2012 12:11 pm 
 

There's a ton of audio interfaces in the $100-$150 dollar range. I have a Presonus Audiobox USB and it's served me well over the past few years. Also make sure to get ASIO4ALL as your driver, it's free and helps a TON.

A Shure SM57 runs about $100 (new or used), will last longer than most people will live, and is a great mic for recording instruments, and some people use them for vocals as well. It's a great all-around mic that you simply cannot beat for the price.

As for your DAW, I would say get Reaper. It's cheap, works great, they update it constantly, and it has a great support community/forum. A lot of us use it around here as well, so we could all help you out.
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xThe__Wizard
Metalhead

Joined: Sun Nov 18, 2012 2:59 pm
Posts: 845
PostPosted: Sun Dec 30, 2012 1:53 pm 
 

infinitenexus wrote:
There's a ton of audio interfaces in the $100-$150 dollar range. I have a Presonus Audiobox USB and it's served me well over the past few years. Also make sure to get ASIO4ALL as your driver, it's free and helps a TON.

A Shure SM57 runs about $100 (new or used), will last longer than most people will live, and is a great mic for recording instruments, and some people use them for vocals as well. It's a great all-around mic that you simply cannot beat for the price.

As for your DAW, I would say get Reaper. It's cheap, works great, they update it constantly, and it has a great support community/forum. A lot of us use it around here as well, so we could all help you out.


I've used Reaper and it seems really complex. I do have to get ASIO4ALL I was trying to figure out how to put it on last night and nothing seems to work so I will have to try again when I get home. The main thing is that with Mixcraft is I get a variety of virtaul instruments and I really like the layout of it. Reminded me of using Digital Performer a bit. I've been having trouble recording and I think the issue is with my driver so I need to figure that out before I buy anything.
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Goremasher
Metal newbie

Joined: Tue Jan 12, 2010 8:42 am
Posts: 167
Location: United States of America
PostPosted: Thu Jan 03, 2013 8:48 pm 
 

While recording, is louder better? I didn't buy a mic for recording, don't know which to get. I got a radio shack one. So anyway. My 200 watt half stack was on 1 or 2 and you could barley hear it on the recording. Any ideas? Louder? New/cheep mic?

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TheUglySoldier
Metalhead

Joined: Mon May 12, 2008 3:44 am
Posts: 1669
Location: Australia
PostPosted: Mon Feb 11, 2013 8:07 am 
 

Anyone have any experience with "live" recordings - as in recording the band all together in the studio with everything miced up, and using those takes for the finished product, not just as something to play along to? I find the band is working better all together when we can feel off each other a bit than when we are listening on headphones and playing along by ourselves.

What I'd mainly be worried about I suppose is the bleeding of sound into other tracks - as in a bit of guitar in the bass track, a bit of bass in the vocals, and probably a lot of drums in everything - and how that could effect mixing. Has anyone recorded this way and have any opinions on the topic? Is it worth it in the end?
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xpsychoblissx
Metal newbie

Joined: Sat Dec 20, 2008 11:18 am
Posts: 294
Location: Phoenix, AZ
PostPosted: Sun Feb 17, 2013 1:34 am 
 

Goremasher wrote:
While recording, is louder better? I didn't buy a mic for recording, don't know which to get. I got a radio shack one. So anyway. My 200 watt half stack was on 1 or 2 and you could barley hear it on the recording. Any ideas? Louder? New/cheep mic?


If it's quiet, that's probably a good thing--at least it's not clipping and sounding like shit. As long as the guitar sound is being picked up properly, I would just turn up the channel(s) that the guitar is recorded on to make it even with whatever else you have recorded.
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xpsychoblissx
Metal newbie

Joined: Sat Dec 20, 2008 11:18 am
Posts: 294
Location: Phoenix, AZ
PostPosted: Sun Feb 17, 2013 1:37 am 
 

TheUglySoldier wrote:
Anyone have any experience with "live" recordings - as in recording the band all together in the studio with everything miced up, and using those takes for the finished product, not just as something to play along to? I find the band is working better all together when we can feel off each other a bit than when we are listening on headphones and playing along by ourselves.

What I'd mainly be worried about I suppose is the bleeding of sound into other tracks - as in a bit of guitar in the bass track, a bit of bass in the vocals, and probably a lot of drums in everything - and how that could effect mixing. Has anyone recorded this way and have any opinions on the topic? Is it worth it in the end?


Not worth the trouble, IMO. Usually it sounds all mashed together and sounds like crap unless you have multiple microphones. No matter what though, it's going to bleed through to some extend. Drums will mix with guitars, bass with vocals, etc. If you have a couple really good mics that you could use as over head mics, you might be able to get a decent sound though (decent in terms of a "live" sound).
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doktersatan
Metal newbie

Joined: Sun Jun 06, 2010 12:42 pm
Posts: 202
Location: Amsterdam
PostPosted: Sun Feb 17, 2013 7:43 am 
 

Not true at all, when youre recording an entire band at once, the placement of the instruments/amplifiers and mics is crucial. If you place everything smart and away from other mics (and keep volume in check, youre micing everything anyway so just give everybody some cans with a makeshift mix - you can leave the drums out :P) It can get pretty darn cool. Ive recorded a lot of punk and grind bands this way. You get an energy thats just not possible with overdubbing everything, and besides not every musician is sklled in dubbing. Doing everything at once is a really quick way to get a nice take without the usual "BUT I THOUGHT THAT PART WAS SUPPOSED TO PLAY8 TIMES! WE"RE ONLY DOING 4!" "this is WRONG!" bullshit bands can put you through.

Also on the subject of louder= better.. it all depends. guitar amplifiers usually open up when you crank them.. find the sweet spot and record that. On the mixer/mic side of things it depends on the recording medium. I'm going to assume you're recording digital. Recording in the digital realm has such an insanely low noisefloor that its definitely best not too record anything too hot. You can increasee the gain later digitally if you really feel it's too quiet but most of the time this is just something in the mix that needs correcting (learn to use compressors, limiters, eq'ing to give everything its own space in the mix etc.)

Also when mixing trynot to mix towards 0 , but -6 dB instead. Digital clipping is something no one likes. Whereas analog distortion has a certain nice sound to it. Also on tape it's crucial to not record anything too quiet, lest you want boost all the mechanical noise such machines make.

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jasonofthestorm
Mallcore Kid

Joined: Tue Mar 09, 2010 4:19 pm
Posts: 3
PostPosted: Wed Feb 20, 2013 10:25 pm 
 

When it comes to setting the level of an amp, I figure it's ideal to have the volume set wherever sounds best. Crank it until it sounds good. If you get unwanted feedback, reel it back a bit. Find the balance that sounds best. The level that it ends up being recorded at is separate from the amp volume--if it's too quiet or if it's clipping, adjust the preamp/input gain accordingly.

This is assuming the amp is being recorded by itself. If there is a whole band playing together in the same room, there are more elements to consider.

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TheUglySoldier
Metalhead

Joined: Mon May 12, 2008 3:44 am
Posts: 1669
Location: Australia
PostPosted: Sat Feb 23, 2013 7:11 am 
 

doktersatan wrote:
Doing everything at once is a really quick way to get a nice take without the usual "BUT I THOUGHT THAT PART WAS SUPPOSED TO PLAY8 TIMES! WE"RE ONLY DOING 4!" "this is WRONG!" bullshit bands can put you through.


Yeah, that's part of why I'm thinking a live recording would be good for my band, as that did come up (not hostile, just confusing at times as we normally all just kinda nod at each other when we want to go into the next part).

I'd definitely - if I was to do this - be using a a lot of mics and be in a pretty big room. A bit of bleeding is alright, I just want to be able to get the closest thing to how we sound together on record, even if only as an experiment.
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doktersatan
Metal newbie

Joined: Sun Jun 06, 2010 12:42 pm
Posts: 202
Location: Amsterdam
PostPosted: Wed Feb 27, 2013 3:23 pm 
 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P3-C1g55GU8

This was recorded on 8 track cassette (tascam 688) , all at once.

We did the bass through a DI (a damagecontrol somethingorother pedal)
The guitars are 2 halfstacks turned towards the walls with shure sm57's in front of them.
The drums were done with a single overhead and kick and snare mics.

Everybody monitored the guitars and stuff through headphones, so that we could keep the amplifiers at a reasonable level.
The vocals through cheap sennheiser live vocal mics.
verb through FX bus.

recording "in the barn" is a really fun way to record, as you can instantly hear how the finished thing is (roughly) going to sound. You can get perfectly acceptable sounds if you think everything through, don't let them tell you otherwise, and don't get sucked into the overproduced metal thing! :P

Our old taperecorder is giving lots of noise on the vocal tracks but that is not an issue your'e going to have whilst recording digital.
I'm the drummer by the way.

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TheUglySoldier
Metalhead

Joined: Mon May 12, 2008 3:44 am
Posts: 1669
Location: Australia
PostPosted: Sun Mar 03, 2013 8:47 am 
 

Cheers for that man, really helpful and a cool example (in case I need to convince anyone, haha). Awesome track, by the way!
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somefella
Veteran

Joined: Sat Dec 20, 2008 11:57 pm
Posts: 2508
Location: Singapore
PostPosted: Thu Aug 08, 2013 12:11 am 
 

TheUglySoldier wrote:
Anyone have any experience with "live" recordings - as in recording the band all together in the studio with everything miced up, and using those takes for the finished product, not just as something to play along to? I find the band is working better all together when we can feel off each other a bit than when we are listening on headphones and playing along by ourselves.

What I'd mainly be worried about I suppose is the bleeding of sound into other tracks - as in a bit of guitar in the bass track, a bit of bass in the vocals, and probably a lot of drums in everything - and how that could effect mixing. Has anyone recorded this way and have any opinions on the topic? Is it worth it in the end?


It can sound cool in certain situations, but IMO it generally isn't advisable unless you are all extremely tight. Kreator's last 2 albums were recorded in such a manner, and it gives the songs a very 'live' feel. But Kreator are one of the tightest live bands around so it works for them.

I know it isn't directly related to what you're asking, but it is an important point nevertheless.
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infinitenexus
Metalhead

Joined: Tue Jan 22, 2008 2:35 am
Posts: 1939
PostPosted: Sun Aug 11, 2013 5:43 pm 
 

In order for a live recording to sound halfway decent, you're going to need to (at least somewhat) isolate each instrument/amp. There will be some bleed regardless, but that'll help. I don't really see much of a benefit to doing things that way, unless you're going for a specifically energetic live feeling. The problem with live recordings is you can't really go back and fix mistakes that easily.
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The_Black_Priest
Metal newbie

Joined: Sat Aug 01, 2009 3:10 am
Posts: 188
Location: India
PostPosted: Wed Aug 14, 2013 1:43 pm 
 

Can someone tell me the most handy soundcards for home recordings? Prices should be affordable :P

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infinitenexus
Metalhead

Joined: Tue Jan 22, 2008 2:35 am
Posts: 1939
PostPosted: Thu Aug 15, 2013 7:23 am 
 

A majority of people don't even bother with soundcards these days. Just get an audio interface, it functions as your soundcard.
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somefella
Veteran

Joined: Sat Dec 20, 2008 11:57 pm
Posts: 2508
Location: Singapore
PostPosted: Mon Aug 26, 2013 8:58 pm 
 

For really really affordable stuff, go for a Line 6 Toneport. I don't like it but it works well enough.
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themicrulah
Metalhead

Joined: Tue Jul 05, 2011 12:00 am
Posts: 1167
PostPosted: Mon Sep 23, 2013 3:16 pm 
 

Hi everyone,

Just wondering if anyone knows of any USB microphones in the $200 or less range. Would be using for recording vocals and guitar. Thanks!
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infinitenexus
Metalhead

Joined: Tue Jan 22, 2008 2:35 am
Posts: 1939
PostPosted: Tue Sep 24, 2013 8:52 pm 
 

For $200 you can get a decent audio interface and a good mic. I would take that over a USB mic any day.
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hots_towel
Metal newbie

Joined: Mon Dec 09, 2013 2:19 am
Posts: 123
Location: United States
PostPosted: Sat Dec 14, 2013 11:06 pm 
 

metronome practice is DEFINITELY a must. a few years ago when me and the guys went into our friends studio to get our single down, one of our guitarists couldn't keep in tune with the metronome. we had to call it for that day and ended up going back a week later after he got it down. Good thing we got hooked up instead of paying strangers.

The thing is, when you are practicing in a garage or studio or whatever, its hard to tell if someone is actually playing at EXACTLY the desired pace with all the noise going on. I agree with OP in that you should have everyone run through the song by themselves before you go in blind and start loosing money.
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Wanderer
Mallcore Kid

Joined: Thu Oct 14, 2004 10:38 pm
Posts: 7
Location: United States
PostPosted: Mon Dec 16, 2013 6:06 pm 
 

Just to jump in with a note on recording guitars and bass for anyone just starting out: for all my recordings made in the past five years or so, I've been using a Johnson J-Station. For those of you who don't know, it simulates amplifier sounds and is plugged into an interface to record. I find that it is incredibly convenient and the tone is excellent/fully believable. I have several good amps (1974 Musicman 210, 1964 Gibson Explorer) and a good condensor mic, but the J-Station is all I really need. They run about $40-50 now (a lot cheaper than when I got mine), so they're perfect for people starting out doing solo projects. They have a decent bank of effects, a built in tuner, and you can save your various amp settings.

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DarkWhatever
Metal newbie

Joined: Wed Dec 11, 2013 11:12 am
Posts: 42
Location: Seattle, WA
PostPosted: Wed Dec 25, 2013 12:05 am 
 

Man... Original post resonates pretty hard with me. Do in fact get your shit together. One of my old bands went to record an EP with J. Robbins, who is pretty legendary in the indie/d.c. hardcore scene. The rates were super high and we were totally DIY, but we wanted to have a solid as fuck first release so we figured "5 songs, whatever... should be in and out..."

We weren't in and out. We spent the entire week 4 hours from home in a shady area of Baltimore. 5 dudes had to share a single bed in a fucking hooker motel with mirrors on the ceilings. We were awakened the first morning by the obnoxious sound that I can only guess was hate sex or bondage.

Anyway, about the studio... Definitely have a plan. I played drums and I only took a half a day to finish my job because I'm a one take, bad ass motherfucker. That was our problem as a band. We only really prepared for our individual roles and not so much as a collective, production team. We had no outline or schedule written out. We had to go back a few months later because guitar parts were forgotten, lyrics were written last minute and left out.

If a label isn't paying for you to make an album then you really can't afford to be writing songs on studio time, unless you can in which case I highly recommend it. We spent 5 times the money we planned on spending but the album came out a lot more multi dimensional which will obviously happen if you have an external producer who believes in what you are doing. Still, for a band that broke up a year later I can't say that $2,000.00 is worth dropping on a twenty minute EP.

Here's what you need to figure out and have written down and ready to go before going to record:

-If using a metronome it will help the engineer if you at least have a good idea what the BPM is on your songs with tempo changes. We spent a whole 8 hour day mapping out click tracks because none of our songs were a constant tempo.

-Think track order. Instead of sitting around behind the mixer thinking "oh, wouldn't it be cool if the end of this song faded out and then had a swell up into this song?" lock that down in advance. I'm not saying you won't have spontaneous moments in a recording studio, but I can usually tell when track transitions are lazy and thoughtless.

-Know what you want sonically. Prepare your instruments. New strings, new drum heads and cymbals that aren't really thick, particularly crash cymbals. Be sure of the general tone you want. You don't wanna spend a whole day getting the right guitar tone. It's a fickle process regardless, but you can have a head start. Have your lyrics done........... for drums, tune everything correctly with fresh, but broken in heads. Getting the drums prepared for recording is a lot easier even if you just use simple adjectives like "punchy," "washy," or "raw" to give the engineer somewhere to begin. And obviously, don't go in there with parts you can barely play.

-even if you don't have the technology or software, its a great idea to know if you want any samples or unorthodox instruments that you have no access to. Don't be afraid to bring reference music with you. It doesn't mean you are ripping a band off if you say that a part should sound similar to another bands part. We're humans and we all draw inspiration. No one is original and we are all going to die alone. Hegel taught me that.

I didn't learn much in college, but what I did learn was to never assume that your audience is made up of experts or clairvoyants. Sorry if some of this stuff comes off as obvious or patronizing, but I didn't think of half of this shit 5 years ago.

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roisen
Mallcore Kid

Joined: Mon Apr 07, 2014 3:41 pm
Posts: 1
PostPosted: Wed Apr 16, 2014 8:53 am 
 

Thanks everybody for these tips.
They are very useful

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mike40k
Metal newbie

Joined: Thu Apr 19, 2007 3:27 pm
Posts: 364
Location: Canada
PostPosted: Thu Jun 26, 2014 3:14 am 
 

Any recs for a reasonably priced (say $150 max) mic for recording acoustic instruments and vocals? Currently only have an SM-57 which I've found great for micing the guitar amp, but not so much other stuff.
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comingxcurse
Mallcore Kid

Joined: Mon Oct 23, 2006 4:10 pm
Posts: 2
Location: United States of America
PostPosted: Thu Jul 03, 2014 1:22 am 
 

My grip with the recording process are the producers who take notes from Dr. Robotnick and roboticize the hell out of everything and sample Steven Hawking on all the vocal tracks. It's also absurd to me that I've had to stand my ground about not being copied and pasted. It's not your album, shut up press record, we're paying you because you bought the equipment to record. Our primary monetary investment is in the live sound.

Auto-tune/Melodyne are great tools to guide the vocalist, but should never be left on the final product.

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RepulsiveVenom
Metal newbie

Joined: Fri Jul 18, 2014 3:56 am
Posts: 58
Location: Australia
PostPosted: Wed Aug 27, 2014 1:56 am 
 

Can anyone recommend a good Audio Interface to record with? One that is really basic and simple.. I suck when it comes to computers so the more basic, the better.
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