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Metalhead696
Mallcore Kid

Joined: Fri Feb 10, 2006 3:04 am
Posts: 15
Location: United States of America
PostPosted: Fri Sep 08, 2006 12:47 am 
 

OptimusPrime wrote:
This might be kind of a stupid question, but I'll ask it anyway.

I've been drumming for about 4 years and consider myself fairly proficient. However, when I'm playing the bass drum I keep my heel pretty much planted on the ground and kind of move my foot up and down from the ankle to play the bass. But whenever I see footage of any drummers playing, it looks like they lift up their whole foot to play. Am I the only one who doesn't do this and is there any real advantage to doing any particular way?

Playing by tapping the toes down, and having the heel up in the air has always beeh much faster for me, and it wears me down less. Playing with my heel planted gives more control though.

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Vansoth
Metal newbie

Joined: Sat Feb 05, 2005 11:19 pm
Posts: 99
Location: United States of America
PostPosted: Sun Sep 10, 2006 11:37 pm 
 

What are you guy's favorite setups? 3 up 1 down? 2 up down? 4 up 2 down? etc.

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OptimusPrime
Mallcore Kid

Joined: Wed Apr 05, 2006 11:10 pm
Posts: 5
Location: United States of America
PostPosted: Mon Sep 11, 2006 11:18 pm 
 

Right now I'm playing a 7 piece double bass kit with 2 rack and 2 floor toms.

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Andyminion
Metal newbie

Joined: Fri Jun 24, 2005 9:18 pm
Posts: 215
Location: United Kingdom
PostPosted: Wed Sep 13, 2006 8:36 pm 
 

3 rack toms, one floor tom, 1 kick drum with double pedal (makes life easier than 2 kicks, and i dont have to buy another bass mic for recording...), 2 snare drums (14" steel shell as standard, 12" maple shell for blasting).

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Tamagod
Mallcore Kid

Joined: Thu Sep 07, 2006 3:45 am
Posts: 1
Location: United States of America
PostPosted: Mon Sep 18, 2006 1:47 pm 
 

At the moment i just have a basic five piece set up with two crashes, hi-hat, ride and china. I feel it's all i really need for industrial. Besides maybe a couple of pads. :headbang:

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Le_Bag
Mallcore Kid

Joined: Fri Sep 15, 2006 1:03 pm
Posts: 2
Location: Sweden
PostPosted: Tue Sep 19, 2006 11:47 am 
 

Yey.

I'd recommend Flo Mounier (Spelling?) from Cryptopsy. Wicked good!
Also, Thomas Haake (Born i my town, Örnsköldsvik) from Meshuggah.

<3

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VainajanVala
Mallcore Kid

Joined: Tue Sep 19, 2006 2:41 pm
Posts: 5
Location: Finland
PostPosted: Wed Sep 20, 2006 2:39 am 
 

Metalhead696 wrote:
OptimusPrime wrote:
This might be kind of a stupid question, but I'll ask it anyway.

I've been drumming for about 4 years and consider myself fairly proficient. However, when I'm playing the bass drum I keep my heel pretty much planted on the ground and kind of move my foot up and down from the ankle to play the bass. But whenever I see footage of any drummers playing, it looks like they lift up their whole foot to play. Am I the only one who doesn't do this and is there any real advantage to doing any particular way?

Playing by tapping the toes down, and having the heel up in the air has always beeh much faster for me, and it wears me down less. Playing with my heel planted gives more control though.

Heel-down? That's pretty odd...


Last edited by VainajanVala on Wed Sep 20, 2006 2:46 am, edited 1 time in total.
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VainajanVala
Mallcore Kid

Joined: Tue Sep 19, 2006 2:41 pm
Posts: 5
Location: Finland
PostPosted: Wed Sep 20, 2006 2:43 am 
 

Metalhead696 wrote:
OptimusPrime wrote:
This might be kind of a stupid question, but I'll ask it anyway.

I've been drumming for about 4 years and consider myself fairly proficient. However, when I'm playing the bass drum I keep my heel pretty much planted on the ground and kind of move my foot up and down from the ankle to play the bass. But whenever I see footage of any drummers playing, it looks like they lift up their whole foot to play. Am I the only one who doesn't do this and is there any real advantage to doing any particular way?

Playing by tapping the toes down, and having the heel up in the air has always beeh much faster for me, and it wears me down less. Playing with my heel planted gives more control though.

For me, playing heel-up has always felt more... natural. It sort of gives the strokes a lot more power, and speed. And for myself, to play heel-down has always felt nearly impossible. I just can't get the stability, that I do, when I play heel-up. But if you manage to play that way, and accomplish to get the feel that you're really hittin' off, then what the hell, that's great. But, I really recommend you try the heel-up technique too, even if just foor your feet, 'cause there could be a possibility that it causes some serious injuries to your ankle. But, If you've played like that for four years now, and never felt anything, then I don't think you have anything to worry about. :D

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AlastairN
Metal newbie

Joined: Wed Mar 15, 2006 7:28 pm
Posts: 58
PostPosted: Fri Sep 22, 2006 3:20 am 
 

Chryxtolf wrote:
Thorgrim_Honkronte wrote:
I've been wanting to get into drumming for such a long time, but I don't really own a set, nor would I have anywhere to practice :(

I imagine that'd a large factor in what seems to be the percieved unavailability of drummers.


I dont blame you, drumming is amazing, and I love it. I love using my bass pedals soooo much. :drool: I've only been playing for about a year and a half, but it became one of my passions, along with the rest of Metal itself. Right now Iv'e been experimenting a little with a band. God, it's one thing to listen to what you love, but to create it is a completly different thing. I love going fast as hell, with Blastbeats and stuff, but sometimes I like to slow down, and go into a little Doom Metal. But I think the unavailability of drummers is really that guitar is the most sought after musical skill, (in Metal) and people become intimidated using all of their limbs at once. It's really simple though. Anyone else?


The cost and space that drums take up is usually more off-putting to new players.

Also, a guitar is easily stored and transported, drums not so.

I agree though, drums are great!

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GoreObsessed
Metal newbie

Joined: Thu Aug 12, 2004 11:56 am
Posts: 37
Location: Finland
PostPosted: Fri Sep 22, 2006 11:26 am 
 

VainajanVala wrote:
Metalhead696 wrote:
OptimusPrime wrote:
This might be kind of a stupid question, but I'll ask it anyway.

I've been drumming for about 4 years and consider myself fairly proficient. However, when I'm playing the bass drum I keep my heel pretty much planted on the ground and kind of move my foot up and down from the ankle to play the bass. But whenever I see footage of any drummers playing, it looks like they lift up their whole foot to play. Am I the only one who doesn't do this and is there any real advantage to doing any particular way?

Playing by tapping the toes down, and having the heel up in the air has always beeh much faster for me, and it wears me down less. Playing with my heel planted gives more control though.

For me, playing heel-up has always felt more... natural. It sort of gives the strokes a lot more power, and speed. And for myself, to play heel-down has always felt nearly impossible. I just can't get the stability, that I do, when I play heel-up. But if you manage to play that way, and accomplish to get the feel that you're really hittin' off, then what the hell, that's great. But, I really recommend you try the heel-up technique too, even if just foor your feet, 'cause there could be a possibility that it causes some serious injuries to your ankle. But, If you've played like that for four years now, and never felt anything, then I don't think you have anything to worry about. :D


True. Definitely heel up and with the ball of the foot. Expecially when we talk about metal music.

Otherwise IMO, it's impossible to play fast... and it gives the necessary firmness and power to the punch. Whatever type of metal you are playing you should try heels up. But hey... It's really up to you :)

I think that in studio conditions the way you play is especially important. Basically, the harder you hit the drum, the better it sounds... that's my experience of it anyways.

-H-

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VainajanVala
Mallcore Kid

Joined: Tue Sep 19, 2006 2:41 pm
Posts: 5
Location: Finland
PostPosted: Sun Sep 24, 2006 4:13 am 
 

GoreObsessed wrote:
VainajanVala wrote:
Metalhead696 wrote:
OptimusPrime wrote:
This might be kind of a stupid question, but I'll ask it anyway.

I've been drumming for about 4 years and consider myself fairly proficient. However, when I'm playing the bass drum I keep my heel pretty much planted on the ground and kind of move my foot up and down from the ankle to play the bass. But whenever I see footage of any drummers playing, it looks like they lift up their whole foot to play. Am I the only one who doesn't do this and is there any real advantage to doing any particular way?

Playing by tapping the toes down, and having the heel up in the air has always beeh much faster for me, and it wears me down less. Playing with my heel planted gives more control though.

For me, playing heel-up has always felt more... natural. It sort of gives the strokes a lot more power, and speed. And for myself, to play heel-down has always felt nearly impossible. I just can't get the stability, that I do, when I play heel-up. But if you manage to play that way, and accomplish to get the feel that you're really hittin' off, then what the hell, that's great. But, I really recommend you try the heel-up technique too, even if just foor your feet, 'cause there could be a possibility that it causes some serious injuries to your ankle. But, If you've played like that for four years now, and never felt anything, then I don't think you have anything to worry about. :D


True. Definitely heel up and with the ball of the foot. Expecially when we talk about metal music.

Otherwise IMO, it's impossible to play fast... and it gives the necessary firmness and power to the punch. Whatever type of metal you are playing you should try heels up. But hey... It's really up to you :)

I think that in studio conditions the way you play is especially important. Basically, the harder you hit the drum, the better it sounds... that's my experience of it anyways.

-H-
All true.

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CthvlhvCvlt
Mallcore Kid

Joined: Mon Sep 18, 2006 10:52 am
Posts: 4
Location: United States of America
PostPosted: Mon Sep 25, 2006 10:55 am 
 

I think when it comes to speed there is no contest for Hellhammer. Maybe not so much the speed of his blasting or double bass, but I've never heard any drummer match his speed on drum fills. If you're looking for some interesting/wierd/brutally fast drumming, I'd listen to Mayhem's Grand Declaration of War. It's definitely Hellhammer at his technically best.

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Earthad1000
Mallcore Kid

Joined: Sun Aug 06, 2006 1:31 am
Posts: 18
Location: United States of America
PostPosted: Tue Sep 26, 2006 9:24 pm 
 

I love Hellhammer, but he is soooo over triggered. Listen to any of the live cds, the one in Italy is the best. At some of the fills i think he's using an electronic drum set. Anywho he is great, not Art Blakey, but great for his style. I also Like Frost, moreso for his tone. On Volcano i love how his bass sounds. For all out blasting listen to his stuff with 1349.


On antoher note, back to double bass... i have trouble counting when i'm playing fast and i end up having my hands playing at a different tempo than my feet. Any suggestions? I find i even lose myself with a metornome(maybe i need to practice with it more.)

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GoreObsessed
Metal newbie

Joined: Thu Aug 12, 2004 11:56 am
Posts: 37
Location: Finland
PostPosted: Wed Sep 27, 2006 3:54 am 
 

Practice

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Vansoth
Metal newbie

Joined: Sat Feb 05, 2005 11:19 pm
Posts: 99
Location: United States of America
PostPosted: Fri Sep 29, 2006 3:25 am 
 

Right now I'm using 2 up and 2 down (10x8, 12x10 racks, 14x14, 16x16 floors), with a 22x16 bass drum, 14x5 Stewart Copeland brass snare, and a 10x6.5 Gretch popcorn snare.

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Andyminion
Metal newbie

Joined: Fri Jun 24, 2005 9:18 pm
Posts: 215
Location: United Kingdom
PostPosted: Fri Sep 29, 2006 6:35 pm 
 

Vansoth wrote:
14x5 Stewart Copeland brass snare, and a 10x6.5 Gretch popcorn snare.


How is the copeland snare? can you recommend it? I was thinking of getting one, i have an old tama imperialstar snare kicking about that stewart used to use but its a bit battered and i was thinking about getting the signature one....

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GoreObsessed
Metal newbie

Joined: Thu Aug 12, 2004 11:56 am
Posts: 37
Location: Finland
PostPosted: Mon Oct 02, 2006 2:52 am 
 

I dunno about you guys, but I would like to see what kinda bongos you all have.. so be free to post some pics.

I have Pearl BLX birch shells TT 12",13",14",16", BD 22" (I don't remember the depths)
14"x8" TRAK (NOT TRAX!!) ash/mahogany laminated snare

I don't have any fresh photos so I just put these old ones from 2004 "Gospel of Madness" -sessions.

Image

Image

Image

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GoreObsessed
Metal newbie

Joined: Thu Aug 12, 2004 11:56 am
Posts: 37
Location: Finland
PostPosted: Tue Oct 03, 2006 1:51 am 
 

Hmmm.


Last edited by GoreObsessed on Wed Oct 04, 2006 2:32 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Vansoth
Metal newbie

Joined: Sat Feb 05, 2005 11:19 pm
Posts: 99
Location: United States of America
PostPosted: Wed Oct 04, 2006 2:18 am 
 

Andyminion wrote:
Vansoth wrote:
14x5 Stewart Copeland brass snare, and a 10x6.5 Gretch popcorn snare.


How is the copeland snare? can you recommend it? I was thinking of getting one, i have an old tama imperialstar snare kicking about that stewart used to use but its a bit battered and i was thinking about getting the signature one....

It works quite well, has a wide tuning range but works especially well at higher tunings. Nice crack and a decent amount of body for a shallow snare.

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Andyminion
Metal newbie

Joined: Fri Jun 24, 2005 9:18 pm
Posts: 215
Location: United Kingdom
PostPosted: Thu Oct 05, 2006 6:45 pm 
 

sounds like exactly what im looking for - cheers, il check it out

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Paul_the_blastard
Mallcore Kid

Joined: Sun Oct 08, 2006 6:14 pm
Posts: 4
Location: United Kingdom
PostPosted: Mon Oct 09, 2006 10:06 am 
 

check out romain goulon. Hes a french drummer and fucking brutal. Easily as good as kollias

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Corscorpii
Mallcore Kid

Joined: Wed Jun 07, 2006 5:27 pm
Posts: 4
PostPosted: Sat Oct 14, 2006 11:33 pm 
 

Alright, lets see. First off - just because on an album a guy is playing at 240 BPM doesn't mean he is truly amazing, or if a drummer can blast it doesn't mean he's good. A fact (which is always 100% true for every metal drummer in a professional recording studio) is that every drummer uses drum triggers - and basically triggers make every drum hit sound accurate and great. With recording technology today also, some shitty 15 year old punk-ass kid can play a totally piss-poor drum beat but engineers can make the drums sound ridiculously amazing. All in all, don't believe everything you hear to be true.

Though, there are some drummers in the metal spectrum which actually should be given credit - and the one drummer off the top of my head that I'm mainly thinking of is Derek Roddy - whom is amazing. He is the best in the field of blast beats, and he also has a good sense of timing and precision.

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Unearthly
Spectre of Wrath

Joined: Sun Mar 27, 2005 8:10 pm
Posts: 635
Location: United States
PostPosted: Sun Oct 15, 2006 10:24 am 
 

Um, okay?

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Andyminion
Metal newbie

Joined: Fri Jun 24, 2005 9:18 pm
Posts: 215
Location: United Kingdom
PostPosted: Sun Oct 15, 2006 3:27 pm 
 

Corscorpii wrote:
Alright, lets see. First off - just because on an album a guy is playing at 240 BPM doesn't mean he is truly amazing, or if a drummer can blast it doesn't mean he's good. A fact (which is always 100% true for every metal drummer in a professional recording studio) is that every drummer uses drum triggers - and basically triggers make every drum hit sound accurate and great. With recording technology today also, some shitty 15 year old punk-ass kid can play a totally piss-poor drum beat but engineers can make the drums sound ridiculously amazing. All in all, don't believe everything you hear to be true.

Though, there are some drummers in the metal spectrum which actually should be given credit - and the one drummer off the top of my head that I'm mainly thinking of is Derek Roddy - whom is amazing. He is the best in the field of blast beats, and he also has a good sense of timing and precision.


I agree with your basic point - just because a drummer plays fast doesnt automatically mean hes good. However its a bit of a sweeping statement to say "its always 100% true" that all metal drummers in professional recording studios use triggers. I agree the vast majority do, but I know and have recorded several who do not. Also using triggers isn't 'cheating' to the level some people believe - you still have to play the drum to get the sound (although i can make blasting more convincing sounding). Plus 9 times out of 10 the triggered sample will be blended with the mic'ed up drum recording. Triggers aren't something exclusive to metal drummers either, they are widely used in most styles of popular music now.
I agree about Derek Roddy though, a really good drummer - also deserving of special mention is Kai Hahto...

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Vansoth
Metal newbie

Joined: Sat Feb 05, 2005 11:19 pm
Posts: 99
Location: United States of America
PostPosted: Sun Oct 15, 2006 10:59 pm 
 

Andyminion wrote:
sounds like exactly what im looking for - cheers, il check it out

Yeah, not a problem man.

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GoreObsessed
Metal newbie

Joined: Thu Aug 12, 2004 11:56 am
Posts: 37
Location: Finland
PostPosted: Mon Oct 16, 2006 2:20 am 
 

Corscorpii wrote:
Alright, lets see. First off - just because on an album a guy is playing at 240 BPM doesn't mean he is truly amazing, or if a drummer can blast it doesn't mean he's good. A fact (which is always 100% true for every metal drummer in a professional recording studio) is that every drummer uses drum triggers - and basically triggers make every drum hit sound accurate and great. With recording technology today also, some shitty 15 year old punk-ass kid can play a totally piss-poor drum beat but engineers can make the drums sound ridiculously amazing. All in all, don't believe everything you hear to be true.

Though, there are some drummers in the metal spectrum which actually should be given credit - and the one drummer off the top of my head that I'm mainly thinking of is Derek Roddy - whom is amazing. He is the best in the field of blast beats, and he also has a good sense of timing and precision.


I've been wondering what makes this guy so 'amazing'? Surely... He is fast and accurate, but... What's the amazing part?

There's tons of drummers that has much more interesting style and way better technique. Listen to Dave Weckl or even Mike Portnoy. Those guys have actually something to offer.

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Andyminion
Metal newbie

Joined: Fri Jun 24, 2005 9:18 pm
Posts: 215
Location: United Kingdom
PostPosted: Mon Oct 16, 2006 1:58 pm 
 

GoreObsessed wrote:
Corscorpii wrote:
Alright, lets see. First off - just because on an album a guy is playing at 240 BPM doesn't mean he is truly amazing, or if a drummer can blast it doesn't mean he's good. A fact (which is always 100% true for every metal drummer in a professional recording studio) is that every drummer uses drum triggers - and basically triggers make every drum hit sound accurate and great. With recording technology today also, some shitty 15 year old punk-ass kid can play a totally piss-poor drum beat but engineers can make the drums sound ridiculously amazing. All in all, don't believe everything you hear to be true.

Though, there are some drummers in the metal spectrum which actually should be given credit - and the one drummer off the top of my head that I'm mainly thinking of is Derek Roddy - whom is amazing. He is the best in the field of blast beats, and he also has a good sense of timing and precision.


I've been wondering what makes this guy so 'amazing'? Surely... He is fast and accurate, but... What's the amazing part?

There's tons of drummers that has much more interesting style and way better technique. Listen to Dave Weckl or even Mike Portnoy. Those guys have actually something to offer.


Its true that Dave Weckl and others (eg John Blackwell, Thomas Lang etc)
can be much more creative and have better technique as you say - however sadly not many of these class of drummers seem keen on playing death metal. Most make a healthy living doing session work etc. so in the field of death metal drummers like Derek Roddy and so on are some of the best. You do make a good point though, I also think some people over-estimate some (not all!) metal drummers - in the grand scheme of things there are a whole lot of drummers who are in another league altogether.

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MikeyC
Official Greeter of Broken Hills

Joined: Wed Jun 14, 2006 5:16 am
Posts: 10911
Location: Australia
PostPosted: Sun Oct 22, 2006 9:23 pm 
 

I've only been alive for 20 years, but I've been practising drums for about 5 years now...maybe a little more. My drumming gods are:

Gene Hoglan (Strapping Young Lad)
Tomas Haake (Meshuggah)
Chris Adler (Lamb Of God)
Raymond Hererra (Fear Factory)
Max Kolesne (Krisiun)

...just to name a few.
Of course, I'm nowhere near the level of these guys, but one day...

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RolandofGilead
Mallcore Kid

Joined: Mon Oct 23, 2006 9:09 pm
Posts: 3
Location: United States of America
PostPosted: Mon Oct 23, 2006 10:24 pm 
 

Hey, I don't know were else to post this and I don't want to start a new thread, but.

I'm looking for a good drum machine/program for my PC. I don't play drums myself and that's why I'll looking for one. I was wondering if any of you know of good programs for a reasonable price?

Thanks.
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GoreObsessed
Metal newbie

Joined: Thu Aug 12, 2004 11:56 am
Posts: 37
Location: Finland
PostPosted: Tue Oct 24, 2006 3:05 am 
 

It took about 3-5 seconds to find 2 topics about this subject:

http://www.metal-archives.com/board/viewtopic.php?t=21489
http://www.metal-archives.com/board/viewtopic.php?t=21509

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RolandofGilead
Mallcore Kid

Joined: Mon Oct 23, 2006 9:09 pm
Posts: 3
Location: United States of America
PostPosted: Tue Oct 24, 2006 11:47 am 
 

Hey, thanks.
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BlackHorizon
Mallcore Kid

Joined: Sun Oct 22, 2006 3:30 pm
Posts: 7
Location: Turkey
PostPosted: Fri Oct 27, 2006 6:20 am 
 

As a drummer for 3 years actually, I have just started to play in a symphonc black metal band for a while. I have also noticed that not so much blast - beat is needed but some forms of twin technics are needed to get over songs. Are there any special things about the twin playing, or any tricks to be familiar to act the twin - playing role in my own best??

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BKaz
Mallcore Kid

Joined: Sun Oct 15, 2006 9:02 pm
Posts: 25
Location: United States of America
PostPosted: Sun Oct 29, 2006 10:37 pm 
 

There aren't many drummers in the metal spectrum that truly deserve any form of credit, though I'd have to say Derek Roddy is the master of blast beats. Just remember that even though drums may sound insanely complex in an album, doesn't mean that the guy is actually playing it. There are tons of studios where 15 year old punk ass, noob drummers come in and the recording engineer can make them sound phenomenal with beat doctor software or using the aid of drum machines. Some of the best drummers in all of music are Vinny Colaiuta, Virgil Donati, Steve Smith, Dave Weckel, Dennis Chambers, and Derek Roddy.

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Bj_1
Mallcore Kid

Joined: Thu Nov 02, 2006 4:57 pm
Posts: 14
Location: Norway
PostPosted: Fri Nov 03, 2006 10:07 pm 
 

Been a drummer for six years now. Im not really a metal drummer though, Im more of a prog-rock/jazz-rock drummer, though Im pretty good at thrash-metal and progressive-metal too. I have two drumkits; one acoustic and one electric.

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GoreObsessed
Metal newbie

Joined: Thu Aug 12, 2004 11:56 am
Posts: 37
Location: Finland
PostPosted: Mon Nov 06, 2006 1:41 am 
 

Bj_1 wrote:
Been a drummer for six years now. Im not really a metal drummer though, Im more of a prog-rock/jazz-rock drummer, though Im pretty good at thrash-metal and progressive-metal too. I have two drumkits; one acoustic and one electric.


Good for you, BJ!

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Winter_Madness
Mallcore Kid

Joined: Mon Nov 13, 2006 12:21 pm
Posts: 5
Location: Canada
PostPosted: Tue Nov 14, 2006 12:14 pm 
 

i watched the flo mounier DVD yesterday and picked up some cool stuff. has anyone els seen this?

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DeathFog
Temporally-Displaced Fossil

Joined: Thu Jun 12, 2003 9:20 am
Posts: 2022
Location: Estonia
PostPosted: Mon Nov 20, 2006 5:25 pm 
 

As for drummers, I suppose Fenriz's performance on Soulside Journey is noteworthy at least. I do not know much about drumming, but in my opinion the stuff he does there is very technical and unusual, correct me if I am wrong. Eric Brecht from D.R.I. though not being the most technical or fast drummer around, also deserves to be mentioned. I like his performance on Death's Back From The Dead demo a lot. I am currently uploading this demo going to post links later on. I would like to hear some comments aboutt he technical aspects of his drumming.
[Edit] Here this demo is : http://www.axifile.com/?8989971
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GoreObsessed
Metal newbie

Joined: Thu Aug 12, 2004 11:56 am
Posts: 37
Location: Finland
PostPosted: Tue Nov 21, 2006 4:23 am 
 

I personally love the drumming on Soulside Journey... simply awesome.

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MEPHISTHUM
Mallcore Kid

Joined: Wed Dec 13, 2006 10:39 am
Posts: 1
PostPosted: Thu Dec 28, 2006 11:43 am 
 

Does anybody here had tried to follow Flo Mounier's DVD performing tips?

That guy is a machine playing drums, and actually he provides many good tips for drummers, but they are sometimes dificult to perform.

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grim_one
Mallcore Kid

Joined: Sat Dec 10, 2005 7:09 pm
Posts: 15
Location: Portugal
PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2007 5:11 pm 
 

i'm a guy who is trying to lern how to play drums. Anyone has any tips for me? how to start, what kit to buy, if there are any sites with online drumming lessons, etc... etc... any help would be welcome because I don't know much about drums... so please if anyone has some tips PM me or something like that
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