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Secular Prayer
Metal newbie

Joined: Tue Oct 29, 2013 1:28 pm
Posts: 67
Location: United States
PostPosted: Tue Jan 06, 2015 10:38 am 
 

Pretty self explanatory. Could be an autobiography, an oral history, any book that has to do with music of any genre is fair game.

My favorite is hands down Our Band Could Be Your Life: Scenes From The American Indie Underground 1981-1991 by Michael Azerrad. It introduced me to so many great bands like Fugazi, Minutemen, Dinosaur Jr, Husker Du and more.

I also just finished reading Girls To The Front: The True Story Of The Riot Grrl Movement by Sara Marcus, and that was a great read.

If you`re into hip-hop, Check The Technique: Liner Notes For Hip-Hop Junkies by Brian Coleman is pretty damn essential. You get to read about how some of the greatest rap albums were made. I just found out there`s a second volume, so I`ll have to hunt that down.

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Unity
Metalhead

Joined: Wed Nov 27, 2013 5:42 pm
Posts: 449
Location: Portugal
PostPosted: Tue Jan 06, 2015 11:17 am 
 

Marilyn Manson's autobiography "The Long Hard Road Out Of Hell" is one of the better books I ever read. I learned a lot from it and it really helped me get through hich school.
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ironmaidens_666
Mallcore Kid

Joined: Sun Feb 02, 2014 8:37 am
Posts: 22
Location: Australia
PostPosted: Fri Jan 09, 2015 4:05 am 
 

Been reading these
ImageImage

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Tod_Im_Juni
Metal newbie

Joined: Thu Mar 18, 2010 9:00 am
Posts: 136
Location: Greece
PostPosted: Fri Jan 09, 2015 6:21 am 
 

David Toop - Ocean of Sound
Interesting look in ambient/experimental (non) music.

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Oxenkiller
Metalhead

Joined: Sat Feb 09, 2008 3:42 am
Posts: 1345
Location: United States of America
PostPosted: Fri Jan 09, 2015 9:43 pm 
 

I remember picking up a copy of Jon Kristiansen's "The Slayer Mag Diaries" and not being able to put it down for weeks. This should be essential reading for anyone into the late 80s/early 90's underground, particularly the way it deals with the "bloody rise of the satanic metal underground" in a totally unobjective way that the above "Lords of Chaos" book does not. Because Jon "Metallion" was THERE, right in the middle of it, and was close friends with the people involved. His accounts of the feud and bloody conflict between Burzum and Mayhem, and of Dead and the suicide, are very poignant because he was close friends with all of them, and doesn't try to sensationalize or objectify any of it but gives a personal account of it. Plus, the material he has, the interviews and features on the bands, are very revealing and interesting.

Of course, Moynihan's book is also a very good read. Some people are not satisfied with it though. He tends to emphasize the links toward fringe politics as much as the music and people involved.

I would also add Albert Mudrian's "Choosing Death: The improbable history of death metal and grindcore." Very good material on the early careers of Napalm Death, Morbid Angel, Obituary, and some of the Swedish and Florida scenes among others, with the central theme being how the big record companies discovered, and subsequently exploited and ultimately damaged the bands from the grind/death metal scenes.

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Dhranna
Mallcore Kid

Joined: Sat Jan 10, 2015 9:27 am
Posts: 11
Location: United Kingdom
PostPosted: Sat Jan 10, 2015 9:53 am 
 

Over the years I've read a lot of different books on a variety of genres.

I'd say all of these were really good:

'Strange Days: My life with and without Jim Morrison' by Patricia Kennealy. JM's 'wife', Wiccan Priestess and journalist. She also writes celtic inspired sci-fi now I believe. This is a great read if you've seen the Oliver Stone Film or read 'No One Here Gets Out Alive'. It's not a mythologising puff piece and it's actually quite tender. Her depiction of Woodstock is great to read as it's really far away from the received , canonised version of the festival.

'All Crews' by Brian Belle Fortune. This is probably the best book (not that there's too many) published about Jungle/DnB. Written by one of the producers of the BBC Radio 1 show 'One in the Jungle'. Good interviews from prominent producers/DJs/promoters and fans.

'Chronicles' by Bob Dylan. Bob Dylan wrote it.

'Renegade' by Mark E. Smith. I'm not that into The Fall but this is a great read. His caustic, alcoholic prose is really funny. His heterodox views on many sacred cows in indie and music in general is a good counterbalance to romanticised crap that's accumulated over the years.

'Triksta' by Nik Cohn. This guy was the inspiration for 'Pinball Wizard' by The Who. It documents his time as an ageing rock journalist trying to find and produce talent in the New Orleans rap scene of the early 2000s. Quite a strange wee book, but well worth the read.

'Decoded' by Jay Z. This is a really nice, coffee table style book. He breaks down a lot his lyrics along with some autobiographical stuff. Lovely photos too. It could be enjoyed as an art book without even reading the text.

'The Art of Metal' This was a great Christmas present. Lovely pictures of classic and contemporary metal covers. Some great full page prints along with smaller pics. Good info about the bands, artists and music too. Divided into sections by era and genre.

'Who I Am' by Pete Townshend. If you like The Who then this is a treat really. It gets boring once you get into the mid 1970s and the money kicks in.

There's a good Lester Bangs collection called 'Mainlines, Blood Feasts and Bad Taste'. he speaks about the Stones being past it in the early 70s!

I'm looking at my shelf here and I'm tempted to keep going but I'll leave it at that for just now.

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Unity
Metalhead

Joined: Wed Nov 27, 2013 5:42 pm
Posts: 449
Location: Portugal
PostPosted: Sat Jan 10, 2015 1:15 pm 
 

Oxenkiller wrote:
.

Of course, Moynihan's book is also a very good read. Some people are not satisfied with it though. He tends to emphasize the links toward fringe politics as much as the music and people involved.



You know, though I did enjoy that book, it has been severely criticised by loads of people, especially Varg.
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InnesI
Metal newbie

Joined: Sat Jun 01, 2013 3:19 pm
Posts: 287
PostPosted: Sun Jan 11, 2015 9:44 am 
 

I generally dislike rock artists biographies since most tend to focus on drug abuse more than anything else. I remember Mansons book getting good reviews but I very much disliked that one. Others come to mind as well such as Lemmy and Slash. The worst offender might be Dave Mustaine. Either he doesn't remember anything about writing and recording Megadeth albums or he just skipped over it. The amount of information apart from his drug abuse is minimal. One that I feel differs from the others is Duff McKagans book though. He does tell the stories of when he was in such bad shape he almost died. But it is not making up the majority of the book and it tells the story on how he turns his life around and does something else with it.

That obviously leads us to books not written by the artists themselves. Blod, eld, död is a good little book on Swedish extreme metal that I find myself revisiting from time to time. I also enjoyed Lords of Chaos. It has its problems but is generally enjoyable. I also read a nice book on the Beatles but I cant seem to remember the name off the top of my head.

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DennisDemoniarch
Metal newbie

Joined: Thu Mar 13, 2014 8:55 pm
Posts: 195
Location: Canada
PostPosted: Sun Jan 11, 2015 2:11 pm 
 

As much as I like Black Metal ...reading about the glamorizing of church burning and the rise of such vile and evil as satanic music (excuse me?) hahaha ...it's all so childish. Lords of Chaos certainly would appeal to a 16yr old. However once you actually mature these grocery store check out counter rags become less 'awesome' and far more embarrassing actually.

I suppose drug use and all that youthful stuff that only happens to old 'losers' becomes less appealing when you actually mature and realize laying in an alley in pissed pants and strung out is sad and could never be 'cool'

How fine a line it is between party fun and life wreckage though... it's a razors edge to walk.

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InnesI
Metal newbie

Joined: Sat Jun 01, 2013 3:19 pm
Posts: 287
PostPosted: Sun Jan 11, 2015 5:29 pm 
 

DennisDemoniarch wrote:
As much as I like Black Metal ...reading about the glamorizing of church burning and the rise of such vile and evil as satanic music (excuse me?) hahaha ...it's all so childish. Lords of Chaos certainly would appeal to a 16yr old. However once you actually mature these grocery store check out counter rags become less 'awesome' and far more embarrassing actually..


Its been a while sicne I read Lords of Chaos but I cant remember them glorifying the movement. Did they? What I can get tired of is the books and the documentaries describing the black metal movement. Since it all happened among few individuals and in a short span of time the story will always be the same. Anyone doing anything on black metal is bound to repeat what has already been said.

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Scorntyrant
Metalhead

Joined: Mon Nov 15, 2004 5:55 am
Posts: 1123
PostPosted: Sun Jan 11, 2015 8:36 pm 
 

A few of my picks:

* Wreckers of Civilisation: The Story of Coum Transmissions & Throbbing Gristle
Fantastic bio/analysis of TG and the roots of industrial music

* Swedish Death Metal
Exhaustively detailed look at the Swedish underground from the 80's to today

* Battlenoise
It's actually quite an aggravating read because of the author (one of the blokes from Kreigsfall-U apparently) very conservative religious and political agenda. This is a history of the "Martial Industrial" scene. OOP due to legal action from Albin Julius of Der Blutharsch apparently. http://www.gangleri.nl/articles/74/batt ... ok-review/

* Boyd Rice's various books - standing in 2 circles/NO!/Twilight man/Pranks

* Electric Eden: Unearthing Britain's Visionary Music
Cool history of British psychedelic folk music

I'm currently anxiously awaiting the re-print of England's hidden reverse (a history of Current 93, COIL and Nurse with wound). Also keen to check out Assimilate: A Critical History of Industrial Music when I get a chance
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bug_man
Metal newbie

Joined: Sun May 11, 2014 12:11 am
Posts: 263
Location: New Zealand
PostPosted: Mon Jan 12, 2015 9:01 am 
 

Oxenkiller wrote:

Of course, Moynihan's book is also a very good read. Some people are not satisfied with it though. He tends to emphasize the links toward fringe politics as much as the music and people involved.

thats because he's a fascist neopagan and he likes to fit varg into a narrative of noble aryans fighting the decline of the west or w/e

InnesI wrote:
What I can get tired of is the books and the documentaries describing the black metal movement. Since it all happened among few individuals and in a short span of time the story will always be the same. Anyone doing anything on black metal is bound to repeat what has already been said.

well not really, the documentaries have basically only covered the norwegian scene, you could do something on the 90s polish scene for instance, that had lots of silly posturing and churchburning and neonazism but no one ever talks about it.

Scorntyrant wrote:
I'm currently anxiously awaiting the re-print of England's hidden reverse (a history of Current 93, COIL and Nurse with wound).

i ordered that like mid last year and they've delayed the damn thing twice now.

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Unity
Metalhead

Joined: Wed Nov 27, 2013 5:42 pm
Posts: 449
Location: Portugal
PostPosted: Mon Jan 12, 2015 2:50 pm 
 

bug_man wrote:
Oxenkiller wrote:

Of course, Moynihan's book is also a very good read. Some people are not satisfied with it though. He tends to emphasize the links toward fringe politics as much as the music and people involved.

thats because he's a fascist neopagan and he likes to fit varg into a narrative of noble aryans fighting the decline of the west or w/e

.


Moynihan denounced the far-right years ago.
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aaronmb666
Metalhead

Joined: Mon Jan 03, 2005 3:37 am
Posts: 1903
PostPosted: Mon Jan 12, 2015 5:43 pm 
 

Motley Crue- The Dirt. Read it twice and it actually got me into reading books.
Slash- kind of similar to The Dirt.
I read one of the Slayer books and didn't care for it. Most of it was stuff I'd already seen online.

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InnesI
Metal newbie

Joined: Sat Jun 01, 2013 3:19 pm
Posts: 287
PostPosted: Mon Jan 12, 2015 6:08 pm 
 

bug_man wrote:
well not really, the documentaries have basically only covered the norwegian scene, you could do something on the 90s polish scene for instance, that had lots of silly posturing and churchburning and neonazism but no one ever talks about it.



Obviously you can look up different places where weird things happened. The main thing is however that the Norwegian, and to some extent the Swedish, black metal scene was hugely influential. The Polish was not.

Unity wrote:
Moynihan denounced the far-right years ago.


He doesn't like the main stream of "far rightists" and he has been very critical of them. He is however, as far as I know, still on the fringe of politics. He is one who expresses admiration for Evola, the conservative revolutionaries etc. There is nothing wrong with that but parts of his political and metaphysical thinking comes from the rightist thought tradition.

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bug_man
Metal newbie

Joined: Sun May 11, 2014 12:11 am
Posts: 263
Location: New Zealand
PostPosted: Tue Jan 13, 2015 12:19 am 
 

hes one of those metapolitical fascists who claims to not be fascist and then writes introductions to new editions of books by evola

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