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iAm
Wastelander

Joined: Tue Nov 20, 2007 12:18 am
Posts: 5629
Location: West of the Duwamish due South of the Sound
PostPosted: Thu Mar 13, 2008 5:38 am 
 

I was wondering, does Heavy Metal really turn us into nihilists, satanists, or any adjective the conservative(In a social manner) world wishes to label us as? I have never seen a negative change in my behavior other than that I have become rather agnostic(being raised as Catholic) and somewhat anti-social personality which has stuck with me even before being a Metalhead. Do we listen to the music because we already feel this way? Or is it the allure of something much different than what we already have.

From the 1930s to the early 1960s Blues was thought of as the Devils Music, because the Negros were the ones who played it on the radio at the time. This music was looked down upon just as much as ours today, so do the older generation have much right to do this to ours?

Keep in mind that I know the majority of answers will be 'No.' but I would like to see the other veiw point aside from ours.

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Balth
Metalhead

Joined: Sat Nov 24, 2007 1:24 am
Posts: 558
Location: Australia
PostPosted: Thu Mar 13, 2008 6:09 am 
 

Metal hasn't really negatively affected me as a person at all, despite the warnings of my parents and other seniors. I'm still Christian, and if anything metal has actually made me slightly more social (which still isn't very social, I'm a very quiet and shy person). Listening to metal suits my personality much better though, I used to listen to hip-hop and when I told people that they were a bit confused as my personality isn't one of a hip hop fan (i.e. loud, confident, perhaps rebellious, etc.). Now people aren't too surprised by my musical taste considering my personality.
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DustyFox
Metal newbie

Joined: Tue Jun 05, 2007 7:27 pm
Posts: 136
Location: Australia
PostPosted: Thu Mar 13, 2008 6:33 am 
 

Hrm, I don't think it has changed my views. I'm essentially the shy, non-threatening wuss I was before I started listening to metal. I just have longer hair now :P

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The_Beast_in_Black
Metal freak

Joined: Sat Sep 29, 2007 11:34 am
Posts: 7741
Location: Australia
PostPosted: Thu Mar 13, 2008 8:22 am 
 

It hasn't really affected my personality much. I'm still a happy, gentle person, and I was already atheist when I started getting into it.

If anything it's just made me less easily shocked by gory lyrics/artwork.
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iAm
Wastelander

Joined: Tue Nov 20, 2007 12:18 am
Posts: 5629
Location: West of the Duwamish due South of the Sound
PostPosted: Thu Mar 13, 2008 8:24 am 
 

The_Beast_in_Black wrote:
If anything it's just made me less easily shocked by gory lyrics/artwork.


Ah. This too. Its funny how 'they' say it will make us want to make this sort of thing a reality; when in fact it gets boring and redundant.

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skrapythecar
Mallcore Kid

Joined: Mon Mar 03, 2008 10:46 pm
Posts: 22
Location: Canada
PostPosted: Thu Mar 13, 2008 9:20 am 
 

Don't take most of the lyrics or the image seriously, just like the sound. So no I'm not being seriously affected. Won't find any "Suspicious chunks" in my room. :guns:

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Musick
Wicker Mantis

Joined: Tue Feb 07, 2006 3:43 pm
Posts: 616
PostPosted: Thu Mar 13, 2008 10:13 am 
 

Ill play devils advocate here...

It has been proven that music influences humans both in good and bad ways. These effects are instant and long lasting. Music is thought to link all of the emotional, spiritual, and physical elements of the universe. Music can also be used to change a person's mood, and has been found to cause like physical responses in many people simultaneously. Music also has the ability to strengthen or weaken emotions from a particular event such as a funeral.

People perceive and respond to music in different ways. The level of musicianship of the performer and the listener as well as the manner in which a piece is performed affects the "experience" of music. An experienced and accomplished musician might hear and feel a piece of music in a totally different way than a non-musician or beginner. This is why two accounts of the same piece of music can contradict themselves.

Rhythm is also an important aspect of music to study when looking at responses to music. There are two responses to rhythm. These responses are hard to separate because they are related, and one of these responses cannot exist without the other. These responses are (1) the actual hearing of the rhythm and (2) the physical response to the rhythm. Rhythm organizes physical movements and is very much related to the human body. For example, the body contains rhythms in the heartbeat, while walking, during breathing, etc. Another example of how rhythm orders movement is an autistic boy who could not tie his shoes. He learned how on the second try when the task of tying his shoes was put to a song. The rhythm helped organize his physical movements in time.

It cannot be proven that two people can feel the exact same thing from hearing a piece of music. For example, early missionaries to Africa thought that the nationals had bad rhythm. The missionaries said that when the nationals played on their drums it sounded like they were not beating in time. However, it was later discovered that the nationals were beating out complex polyrhythmic beats such as 2 against 3, 3 against 4, and 2 against 3 and 5, etc. These beats were too advanced for the missionaries to follow.

Responses to music are easy to be detected in the human body. Classical music from the baroque period causes the heart beat and pulse rate to relax to the beat of the music. As the body becomes relaxed and alert, the mind is able to concentrate more easily. Furthermore, baroque music decreases blood pressure and enhances the ability to learn. Music affects the amplitude and frequency of brain waves, which can be measured by an electro-encephalogram. Music also affects breathing rate and electrical resistance of the skin. It has been observed to cause the pupils to dilate, increase blood pressure, and increase the heart rate.
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Musick
Wicker Mantis

Joined: Tue Feb 07, 2006 3:43 pm
Posts: 616
PostPosted: Thu Mar 13, 2008 10:13 am 
 

A renowned Bulgarian psychologist, Dr. George Lozanov, designed a way to teach foreign languages in a fraction of the normal learning time. Using his system, students could learn up to one half of the vocabulary and phrases for the whole school term (which amounts to almost 1,000 words or phrases) in one day. Along with this, the average retention rate of his students was 92%. Dr. Lozanov's system involved using certain classical music pieces from the baroque period which have around a 60 beats per minute pattern. He has proven that foreign languages can be learned with 85-100% efficiency in only thirty days by using these baroque pieces. His students had a recall accuracy rate of almost 100% even after not reviewing the material for four years.

High school students who study music have higher grade point averages that those who don't. These students also develop faster physically. Student listening skills are also improved through music education. The top three schools in America all place a great emphasis on music and the arts. Hungary, Japan, and the Netherlands, the top three academic countries in the world, all place a great emphasis on music education and participation in music. The top engineers from Silicon Valley are all musicians. Napoleon understood the enormous power of music. He summed it up by saying, "Give me control over he who shapes the music of a nation, and I care not who makes the laws" .
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Acrobat
Eric Olthwaite

Joined: Fri Jul 06, 2007 8:53 am
Posts: 6535
Location: Fortress Northallerton, North Yorkshire
PostPosted: Thu Mar 13, 2008 11:57 am 
 

Now for the Scandinavian answer;

Metal simply awakened the true Satan within me, causing me to reject a thousand years of Judeo-Christian Slavery....aggggrrhhh I love Jon, we will be together soon.

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Tezcat
Metal newbie

Joined: Sat Oct 23, 2004 10:39 am
Posts: 333
Location: Colombia
PostPosted: Fri Mar 14, 2008 3:51 am 
 

Many people dabble into Metal during their identity construction process, but they quickly move to other things, yes, but those who are sought by Metal tend to stay loyal.

Could it be that certain music appeals to certain kinds of people, and not vice-versa?

It's not that Metal gives me a sense of superiority, but I see people into common music, commmon trends, wasting their time caring about what's "hype" or "in", listening to rendy music --the kind of which they will soon forget about-- and when I talk to them, ,ost of these persons prove to be utter cretins.

I'm not saying that there aren't cretin metallers, but many metalheads tend to have string interests in arts, literature, politics, history, social science, human behaviour, tend to be less shocked by the atrocities mankind is capable of, adopting a rather cynical point of view. Many common, trendy people are not close to having those interests. (Many metalheads have a taste for classical music as well)

Am I exaggerating when I say Metal is for smart people? Could it be that introspective, intellectual people tend to have certain interests and for some reason end up into Metal and other non-trendy music?

PS The Myth Busters proved that plants grow faster if you played them some good old Heavy Metal. I wonder what results would Lozanov have teaching their students foreign languages using Metal. Hell, I did learn most of my english speaking skills by listening to Metal, and my next target is German language. Guess I'll have to listen to a bunch of Gothic/Folk Metal bands, then :)

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lord_ghengis
Metal freak

Joined: Mon Dec 04, 2006 8:31 pm
Posts: 5372
Location: Australia
PostPosted: Fri Mar 14, 2008 6:59 am 
 

As far as religion goes, I never believed in anything, and I haven't been forced to lean towards satanism or any of the like because of the music (although it led to me having more interest in, and agreeing with a few of the non-religious philosphies). But as to how I act there's no real difference, I still have the some morals I had before, I'm still just as non-confrontational as I was before.

The only thing that's different is my musical taste is much better.

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NeglectedField
Onwards to Camulodunum!

Joined: Wed Aug 24, 2005 6:19 am
Posts: 1390
Location: United Kingdom
PostPosted: Fri Mar 14, 2008 9:40 am 
 

I think my social disposition is quite conducive to being interested in underground music, and metal's discourse seems to be one of the most radical and critical (imo). Metal is very much an 'other' kind of music, that is, until you get to obvious names like Metallica.
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Dragunov
Metalhead

Joined: Wed Dec 29, 2004 6:34 pm
Posts: 2328
Location: United States of America
PostPosted: Fri Mar 14, 2008 11:52 am 
 

If anything, metal has the ability to sway one into a more open-minded direction. I'm sure a few of us had to step a little bit outside of their comfort zone to get into the more extreme side of the genre, anyways.
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vondskapens_makt
Metalhead

Joined: Thu Nov 22, 2007 5:23 pm
Posts: 567
Location: United States of America
PostPosted: Fri Mar 14, 2008 12:01 pm 
 

Well, Metal has opened some doors for me. From Metal arose an interest in philosophy, psychology, etc. It's led me to become a more mature, cynical person as well.
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RedMisanthrope
Poet Laureate of the Old Ones

Joined: Sat May 19, 2007 1:53 pm
Posts: 1939
Location: United States of America
PostPosted: Fri Mar 14, 2008 12:06 pm 
 

I'll admit that it heavy metal had a hand in my rejection of Christianity, namely Behemoth. The lyrics in Demigod are superbly written, full of lessons, and philosophies. I'm a pretty spiritual person, and I consider myself to be somewhat "enlightened". It could be argued of course that if I consider myself to be enlightened, then I really am not. Regardless, I can safely say that I would not be the person I am today without metal, for better or worse.
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Littlewolf
Metal newbie

Joined: Tue May 01, 2007 4:18 am
Posts: 146
PostPosted: Fri Mar 14, 2008 2:34 pm 
 

Tezcat wrote:
Could it be that certain music appeals to certain kinds of people, and not vice-versa?



That's what I've been saying all along.
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MikeyC
Official Greeter of Broken Hills

Joined: Wed Jun 14, 2006 5:16 am
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Location: Australia
PostPosted: Fri Mar 14, 2008 3:53 pm 
 

I got into metal mostly due to the fact of my personality at the time, which was one of depression and isolation. I still feel those today, and they are in no way exemplified or reduced, as far as I can tell. These days I like metal for different reasons, as well as because of my emotional issues. This is all a matter of opinion and is varied with every person.

The only way I can know for sure if metal makes me think nihilistic or not is if I just stop listening and liking metal. If my personality changes for the better, then I'll know.
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DanFuckingLucas
Witchsmeller Pursuivant

Joined: Sun Nov 02, 2003 7:30 am
Posts: 7555
Location: United Kingdom
PostPosted: Fri Mar 14, 2008 4:52 pm 
 

Metal may have had an effect during my teenage years, and still affects the way I dress (if I was in to pop music, I'm pretty certain I wouldn't be wearing ratty old Leona Lewis tour shirts), but aside from that, I don't think so. I've been raised on a healthy diet of meat, metal and Schwarzenegger films by a dad who had a love of the same things - and he's a respected businessman. My anti-Christian sentiments come more from the fact that I'm a biologist and as such am unable to accept the existence of God, or 'miracles.'

Growing up listening to metal has had little - if nothing - to do with who I've become.
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DBettino
Metalhead

Joined: Sat Apr 26, 2003 10:43 pm
Posts: 2147
Location: United States
PostPosted: Fri Mar 14, 2008 10:13 pm 
 

iAm wrote:
I was wondering, does Heavy Metal really turn us into nihilists, satanists, or any adjective the conservative(In a social manner) world wishes to label us as? I have never seen a negative change in my behavior other than that I have become rather agnostic(being raised as Catholic) and somewhat anti-social personality which has stuck with me even before being a Metalhead. Do we listen to the music because we already feel this way? Or is it the allure of something much different than what we already have.

From the 1930s to the early 1960s Blues was thought of as the Devils Music, because the Negros were the ones who played it on the radio at the time. This music was looked down upon just as much as ours today, so do the older generation have much right to do this to ours?

Keep in mind that I know the majority of answers will be 'No.' but I would like to see the other veiw point aside from ours.


The other point of view is that it's just noise. That's what my dad says, as do others that find this type of music too abrasive. I could never give a better explanation of this opinion because I just don't understand people's tastes in general. I can understand how someone from the 60's would say Pestilence is just noise, but these people tend to have the same reaction to bands like Arkona. I'd never be able to explain why they don't see the difference.

As far as any stigma associated with metalheads, metalheads are no different with each other than outsiders are with them. They're judgmental and petty just like everyone else. Most glibly dismiss anything outside the metal scene besides Tolkien, Lovecraft, and horror movies. Most know very little about the music they profess to enjoy. Most are too disconnected with the world around them to even consider Nihilism. Most like Exodus' last album.

It doesn't bother me that people bash Metal. I confess that it actually gives me kind of a thrill to tell people I'm into it, since I don't really look the part except for my Bathory hoodie and nobody knows that band. It gives me a thrill for the same reason that I felt a surge of pride earlier today in downtown Chicago when I told some street proselytizer to fuck off among a crowd of tourists. I don't mind being marginalized by my music or my opinions. I want to antagonize people. This is likely something we all have in common.

iAm wrote:
Do we listen to the music because we already feel this way?


I think what brings most people to metal is not any sociopolitical or philisophical insight, but simply a desire to delve into a form that isn't typically offered in mainstream channels. You could perhaps call this 'anti-social'. I think that metalheads start listening to metal when their opinions about the world are just developing. It is natural for antagonistic and provocative people to find the music that best expresses these same qualities.

The problem, of course, is that the more we listen to it, the less it provokes us. Many metalheads become so desensitized to violent music that they are unable to discern good from bad, and consequently see 'brutality' as a substitute for thoughtful composition. And so, metalheads listen to Devildriver because it's what makes their blood boil this week, but after a few listens it becomes tame. How could it not, since its only purpose is to be abrasive? It's like computer software that becomes outdated; if there's something out there that's more convenient (immediately gratifying), why shouldn't you use that instead? The more provocative a band actually is, the more expediently it gets buried below the fold. Isn't it ironic that today's bands are competing to be the heaviest and most misanthropic, while your typical metalhead competes to be the most banal and disinterested?

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Murderknob
Mallcore Kid

Joined: Sat Jan 12, 2008 4:50 pm
Posts: 11
Location: United States of America
PostPosted: Sat Mar 15, 2008 5:02 am 
 

I like to think of Metal as my "Driving Force" towards people. Before, I was weak and timid; no true back bone. Then came Slayer, Pantera, and Metallica... my life/thought process forever changed.

Slayer-Helped me see the true way to live is on your own.
Pantera-Enabled me to say "Fuck You!" and made me defend what I believed in.
Metallica-Told me "not to take shit from anyone".

Without Metal, I wouldn't be who I am today.

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Scipio333
Metal newbie

Joined: Sun Apr 15, 2007 10:54 pm
Posts: 100
Location: Syria
PostPosted: Sat Mar 15, 2008 6:25 am 
 

I don't think metal actually shapes one into the characteristics mentioned by the OP, it merely 'introduces' to these characteristics/ideologies...etc, and if you had the potential to embrace them, then you would, if you didnt, then they would have as much effect on you as farting on the floor (other than making knowledgeable of these ideologies).

An example I could find in myself is that I have always been interested in history and mythology (mainly Greek mythology), but never dwelved into Scandinavian mythology since I never knew how interesting it was, however, thanks to certain metal bands, my interest in Scandinavian mythology has been ignited. If I didnt have the potential to be interested in mythology in general, mythology themed lyrics would have as much effect on me as, again, farting on the floor.

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MadassAlex
Metal newbie

Joined: Sun May 13, 2007 6:20 am
Posts: 64
Location: Australia
PostPosted: Sat Mar 15, 2008 9:11 am 
 

I think what drew me to metal was the guitar tone and the fast solo sections that reminded me predominantly of classical music.

A common social theme didn't have much to do with it, but metal has definitely influenced me. I think it shut down some naiveness in me and prompted me to question certain ideas.

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DivineDevil
Metal newbie

Joined: Wed May 16, 2007 3:24 pm
Posts: 30
Location: Netherlands
PostPosted: Sat Mar 15, 2008 6:54 pm 
 

Tezcat wrote:
Am I exaggerating when I say Metal is for smart people? Could it be that introspective, intellectual people tend to have certain interests and for some reason end up into Metal and other non-trendy music?


There has been a study in the Netherlands, that was published in a newspaper, that stated that people who listened to more "obscure" music (not only metal) tend to be higher educated. I know that these studies aren't always as reliable, but I still found it good to mention it here.

As for me, I have been into metal since I was around 12 years of age. I didn't listen to things as Burzum then, but I did like Master of Puppets and stuff, the effect on me, therefore, I don't think I shall ever know. I do know that I am very much interested in psychology, norse mythologie (this is mostly, indeed, because of (especially black) metal), and (especially) history.

On another note, I don't think that people who listen to trendy stuff are stupid or anything of that kind, so please don't get me wrong there.

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iAm
Wastelander

Joined: Tue Nov 20, 2007 12:18 am
Posts: 5629
Location: West of the Duwamish due South of the Sound
PostPosted: Sat Mar 15, 2008 8:08 pm 
 

Thats another good point. I too am interested in psychology and history, though my grades right now do nothing to show that. From the very few people I know who listen to Black Metal they seem to be very intellectual, with one acception. Intellectualists also are the ones which Ive introduced the genre to quite easily.

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hippiedrow
Metalhead

Joined: Sat Feb 23, 2008 7:15 pm
Posts: 1720
Location: United States of America
PostPosted: Mon Mar 17, 2008 12:58 am 
 

I would say that metal has augmented what I have been doing for a majority of my life. The realism and depth of some songs lyrics are also really useful for expressing my point of views in a (scope?) that I normally would have difficulty putting into words.
Also, I (used to) play D&D, and metal has a lot of themes that fit really well with the world of dungeons and dragons.

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Blacklinkz
Metalhead

Joined: Sat May 19, 2007 1:30 pm
Posts: 419
Location: México
PostPosted: Mon Mar 17, 2008 2:25 am 
 

The_Beast_in_Black wrote:
It hasn't really affected my personality much. I'm still a happy, gentle person, and I was already atheist when I started getting into it.

If anything it's just made me less easily shocked by gory lyrics/artwork.


This. I think that the music you listen to does not changes you as a person. It rather changes the way the society looks at you. But it's only a prejudgement born out of our conservative society. You could be the most shy and quiet person in the world and listen to pop, or hip-hop; or you could be the most nice and sociable human in the planet and listen to misanthropic death/black metal.
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Thrashedtofuck
Metal newbie

Joined: Fri Aug 19, 2005 6:56 pm
Posts: 350
Location: Sweden
PostPosted: Mon Mar 17, 2008 7:58 am 
 

Metal has most certainly changed my personality, before metal I was a shy, depressed and very insecure.

Listening to songs about strength, heroism, history, conifdence etc. Really helped mold my thoughts in that direction.

I mostly listen to NWOBHM, Heavy Metal and Speed Metal though which usually holds a much more positive or constructive view than more extreme forms of metal.

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The_Beast_in_Black
Metal freak

Joined: Sat Sep 29, 2007 11:34 am
Posts: 7741
Location: Australia
PostPosted: Mon Mar 17, 2008 9:05 am 
 

DivineDevil wrote:
Tezcat wrote:
Am I exaggerating when I say Metal is for smart people? Could it be that introspective, intellectual people tend to have certain interests and for some reason end up into Metal and other non-trendy music?


There has been a study in the Netherlands, that was published in a newspaper, that stated that people who listened to more "obscure" music (not only metal) tend to be higher educated. I know that these studies aren't always as reliable, but I still found it good to mention it here.


Well, I find that since metal is harder to "get into", it tends to attract mostly intelligent, or at least thoughtful, people. The same goes for most underground, unusual or contemplative musical styles.

People with less intelligence, or less prone to think about their music, will gravitate more towards something that offers instant gratification, thus they're generally into accessible genres.
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FearTheNome
Metal newbie

Joined: Fri Jun 13, 2003 8:41 am
Posts: 372
Location: United States
PostPosted: Mon Mar 17, 2008 6:32 pm 
 

Metal never changed me, I embraced metal because it fits who I am as a person.

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ZackP
Metal newbie

Joined: Fri Jul 13, 2007 1:36 am
Posts: 41
Location: United States of America
PostPosted: Mon Mar 17, 2008 7:25 pm 
 

I was already doubting religion when I first discovered metal. It helped cement my views, and in a way helped lead to my atheism. Also, if anything, it has made me more confident, and has helped my social life.

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Chaos_Llama
Metalhead

Joined: Fri Mar 07, 2008 7:04 pm
Posts: 430
Location: United States
PostPosted: Tue Mar 18, 2008 6:46 am 
 

I was an atheist before I got into metal. I can't reasonably say metal has had any effect on me whatsoever. It adds a new part of me musically, but in all other areas, no.

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Ilwhyan
Metel fraek

Joined: Sat Sep 29, 2007 1:41 pm
Posts: 6378
Location: Finland
PostPosted: Tue Mar 18, 2008 6:54 am 
 

I hadn't given much thought to religion before getting into metal. I wasn't religious by any means, I guess I considered all religions to be utter rubbish back then. Only after becoming familiar with certain philosophies often seen in metal lyrics, I started thinking about my own beliefs. Philosophically speaking, I'm agnostic, but I merely admit I, as a human, cannot possibly understand, prove or disprove the existence of a god. What I know is that no such thing affects my life.
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SilenceIsConsent
Mallcore Kid

Joined: Fri Jan 18, 2008 12:46 pm
Posts: 14
Location: United States
PostPosted: Fri Mar 21, 2008 8:59 pm 
 

iAm wrote:
I was wondering, does Heavy Metal really turn us into nihilists, satanists, or any adjective the conservative(In a social manner) world wishes to label us as? I have never seen a negative change in my behavior other than that I have become rather agnostic(being raised as Catholic) and somewhat anti-social personality which has stuck with me even before being a Metalhead. Do we listen to the music because we already feel this way? Or is it the allure of something much different than what we already have.

From the 1930s to the early 1960s Blues was thought of as the Devils Music, because the Negros were the ones who played it on the radio at the time. This music was looked down upon just as much as ours today, so do the older generation have much right to do this to ours?

Keep in mind that I know the majority of answers will be 'No.' but I would like to see the other veiw point aside from ours.


To me, metal is only really a proposal that offers ideas and promotes awareness. It really has made me much more aware of the world around me, but has not changed my political or religious beliefs one bit. I still continue to go to my local catholic church yet I listen to the most satanic music one could want. I listen to music that talks about radical revolution yet I harbor some conservative ideas. I do think it also can make people a bit more social. I know that after I got into metal I met a lot of brand new people who are so interesting and awesome to be friends with and I feel honored to have them as friends.

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tomcat_ha
Veteran

Joined: Fri Oct 27, 2006 8:05 am
Posts: 2637
Location: Netherlands
PostPosted: Fri Mar 21, 2008 10:05 pm 
 

Metal appeals to me because of the riffs. The repetitiveness that changes is what really appeals to me. That is also why i like some really old folk music. I am fairly smart (iq over 130) but that is not related to my liking of metal i think. I think me having asperger syndrome is more important.

Before i discovered metal during late 2003 i had a brief red hot chilli peppers period. Currently i listen to all kinds of metal as long as there isnt excessive soloing or keyboarding metal is riffs for me and i dont mind at all songs with just riffs.

I dont think metal influenced my character. Ive always been somewhat antisocial(quite social for a asperger however) but the lyrics have not influenced me at all. As ive always been a i dont care what he does with his voice as long as it sounds good.

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Kruel
Veteran

Joined: Mon Nov 19, 2007 9:56 pm
Posts: 3426
PostPosted: Fri Mar 21, 2008 11:07 pm 
 

Metal does make the listeneres more open to the dark, politically incorrect, "evil" things.
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So, Manes > Samael?
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yeah, it's ironic, they are so pretentious, yet one can say that at least they don't pretend. They don't release some techno-rap-whatever album and say "on this record we tried to sound like in our old days"

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LucidInterval
Metal newbie

Joined: Sun Sep 16, 2007 6:01 pm
Posts: 199
Location: United States of America
PostPosted: Sat Mar 22, 2008 1:23 am 
 

vondskapens_makt wrote:
Well, Metal has opened some doors for me. From Metal arose an interest in philosophy, psychology, etc. It's led me to become a more mature, cynical person as well.

This.

Also, it opened me up to alot of other musical styles I probably wouldn't have gotten into without metal and it got me into most forms of art in general.

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metalface
Mallcore Kid

Joined: Sun Mar 26, 2006 12:41 am
Posts: 4
Location: Dominican Republic
PostPosted: Sat Mar 22, 2008 3:28 am 
 

I think I've become more violent since I listen to metal... nah, don't think it has affected my behaviour at all, or enough for me or the people surrounding me to notice.

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RoacXIII
Mallcore Kid

Joined: Tue Mar 13, 2007 11:13 am
Posts: 26
Location: Iceland
PostPosted: Sat Mar 22, 2008 8:59 am 
 

I don't think it has done me any harm. In fact it has helped me in choosing my friends more wisely. People that respect other peoples musical taste even if they don't share it are better friends in my opinion. I used to be picked in constantly for being the only kid in school that listens to metal but now I'm quite happy and my new friends respect me and I respect them in return.
_________________
And this next song is called Graaaaahhh, Urgh, Aaaaarrrggghh!

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Svartalf
Metal newbie

Joined: Wed Feb 14, 2007 10:22 am
Posts: 117
Location: New Zealand
PostPosted: Sat Mar 22, 2008 12:04 pm 
 

Kruel wrote:
Metal does make the listeneres more open to the dark, politically incorrect, "evil" things.


Are you sure? Personally I liked or was interested in (I'm not sure "like" is a good word for, say, Nazi occultism) all of those sorts of things long before I had ever heard metal, and continue to be interested in them even when I haven't been listening to it much. Are you sure you didn't just happen to find Metal first? I started reading a lot long before I started listening to metal. How about you?

I would definitely say, however, that being open to those things made me open to metal, but I would also not recommend Burzum, or Gorgoroth, or whatever, for people whose perch on the mental balance-beam is at all tenuous...

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Chaos_Llama
Metalhead

Joined: Fri Mar 07, 2008 7:04 pm
Posts: 430
Location: United States
PostPosted: Sat Mar 22, 2008 12:16 pm 
 

Kruel wrote:
Metal does make the listeneres more open to the dark, politically incorrect, "evil" things.


Well it's certainly made me much more interested in the whole "dark" aesthetic, but I disagree with the other ideas you say. If anything it's made me appreciate the cathartic ability negative/dark mood & atmosphere can have in music, and how beautiful it can be.

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