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Under_Starmere
Abhorrent Fish-Man

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PostPosted: Sat Jun 14, 2014 5:20 pm 
 

Re: Paul Atreides and the "chosen one who is really special defeats a great, evil power" trope:

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dystopia4
Thumbman

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Location: Canada
PostPosted: Sat Jun 14, 2014 9:04 pm 
 

Just finished the Sister Brothers by Patrick deWitt. This was a nice change of pace after reading The Blood Meridian - a much lighter read, to say the very least. Although I have nothing to say about his writing style either way and his research on the period it is set in could have been a lot stronger, his storytelling and character development was thoroughly entertaining. Especially worth checking out if you're into Western-tinged stuff.
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Nahsil
Clerical Sturmgeschütz

Joined: Sun Jan 08, 2006 2:06 pm
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PostPosted: Sat Jun 14, 2014 10:33 pm 
 

Under_Starmere wrote:
Re: Paul Atreides and the "chosen one who is really special defeats a great, evil power" trope:



I've been reading a lot of archetypal mythology/psychology* and watching a series of lectures by a great professor on the topic. HAH!

*
http://www.amazon.com/Re-Visioning-Psyc ... 0060905638
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Scorntyrant
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PostPosted: Mon Jun 23, 2014 5:54 am 
 

Just finished the first 2 books in Stephen King's Dark Tower cycle, "The Gunslinger" and "The drawing of the three" . Actually enjoyed these quite a lot.Next up is Thomas Picketty's "Capital in the 21st century"
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iamntbatman
Chaos Breed

Joined: Sat Feb 21, 2009 5:55 am
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PostPosted: Mon Jun 23, 2014 6:58 am 
 

Finished The Fall of Hyperion. Lemme copy/paste my review from Goodreads:

Quote:
This book is a complete mess. If Goodreads allowed half-star ratings this would be a shining example of a 2.5 star book.

Gone is the episodic structure of the first book in the series, which played to Simmons' apparent strengths and focused on shorter narratives that often wore their inspirations on their sleeves (the Neuromancer-worshiping in Brawne Lamia's tale was especially well-done) and, in hindsight, helped to obscure Simmons' lack of a distinctive voice (or, at least, a distinctive voice that's worthwhile).

The Fall of Hyperion falls into the unfortunate trap of having to explain all of the unanswered questions laid out in the first book; the rub being that the explanations are vastly less interesting than their associated mysteries (or, in some cases, are outright stupid). Without the benefit of the episodic storytelling, all of this stuff gets burped out in rather dull, generic sci-fi prose interspersed with occasional misguided forays into the literary. The sexiness of the tech and weaponry has lost some of its appeal as we were already treated to some quality gun-and-spaceships porn in the first book, so there's little that's fresh and exciting enough to make up for the huge step down in structure and narrative.

Not to mention John bloody Keats. At the center of this whole story is Simmons' obsession with John Keats, weaving his poetry and persona into every conceivable facet of the story. If that sounds hamfisted and awkward, that's because it absolutely is. Every Keats-heavy segment dragged and dragged, with extended scenes recreating events from Keats' life and even blurting out of lengthy chunks of his verse that Simmons is determined to force into his space opera. It's sort of fascinatingly bizarre that Simmons has such a love for finely crafted verse and profound literature, yet in the same book he will have characters see something dramatic and literally utter the phrase, "My god..." completely unironically. Some segments of the book read like cheap bargain bin sci-fi while others are more like historical fiction lit worship and I'm seriously disappointed that Simmons wasn't able to better meld the two disparate ends of palette (the closest he comes are the conversations with Ummon, with his Zen-like koans that actually sort of work).

That said, the book isn't without redeeming qualities. Some of the battle scenes are pretty neat, the Ousters are quite cool, and the Neuromancer-worshippy parts are still somewhat fun, but it's still quite a letdown after the very exciting (if far from truly great) first book in the series. I'll probably get to subsequent books eventually, but I'm not in a huge hurry after slowly working my way through this one.


So yeah...not super eager to jump right into book 3 (there's not even much of a feeling that there was meant to be a third book, anyway, as the story is wrapped up pretty tightly by the end of this one).
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RedMisanthrope
Poet Laureate of the Old Ones

Joined: Sat May 19, 2007 1:53 pm
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PostPosted: Mon Jun 23, 2014 8:58 pm 
 

Simmons is pretty good but every long book of his I've read (The Terror, Drood, Carrion Comfort) is literally 200-250 pages too long, which kind of boggles my mind. Now don't get me wrong, I enjoy a nice long book to get lost in, but there are so many parts that I feel could probably be removed and it just wouldn't affect the story at all. Explanations to mysteries falling flat seems to be a motif of his as well, especially in The Terror and Drood. He's great at set up, but climaxes lack some times. It might not sound like it, but I do consider myself a fan, it's just that when he's on he's on, when he's dry he's dry.
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Nahsil
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PostPosted: Tue Jun 24, 2014 3:57 am 
 

I dunno what to read after I finish Wolfe's Wizard Knight books.

Going back to scifi sounds appealing. Maybe I should tackle some of the Culture books? The Forever War? Some Samuel R. Delany, Mervyn Peake, A. A. Attanasio, Cordwainer Smith? Just a few authors I've been considering lately. I wouldn't mind something a little bit literary, kind of craving the writing style of Eco/Borges/Wolfe.
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iamntbatman
Chaos Breed

Joined: Sat Feb 21, 2009 5:55 am
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PostPosted: Tue Jun 24, 2014 6:53 am 
 

Well it's not really sci-fi at all but I can't recommend the Titus Groan books enough. All three were absolutely sublime but the second especially was seriously life-affirming/altering shit for me. Really kicking myself for not having read those books when I was younger.
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Under_Starmere
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Joined: Tue Apr 24, 2007 5:00 pm
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PostPosted: Tue Jun 24, 2014 9:04 am 
 

Nahsil wrote:
Some Samuel R. Delany


:love: :thumbsup:
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failsafeman
Digital Dictator

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PostPosted: Tue Jun 24, 2014 4:48 pm 
 

Nahsil wrote:
I dunno what to read after I finish Wolfe's Wizard Knight books.

Going back to scifi sounds appealing. Maybe I should tackle some of the Culture books? The Forever War? Some Samuel R. Delany, Mervyn Peake, A. A. Attanasio, Cordwainer Smith? Just a few authors I've been considering lately. I wouldn't mind something a little bit literary, kind of craving the writing style of Eco/Borges/Wolfe.

Honestly you can't go wrong with anything on that list. Just throw a dart.
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Smoking_Gnu
Chicago Favorite

Joined: Sat Mar 15, 2008 11:22 pm
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PostPosted: Tue Jun 24, 2014 4:55 pm 
 

Scorntyrant wrote:
Just finished the first 2 books in Stephen King's Dark Tower cycle, "The Gunslinger" and "The drawing of the three" . Actually enjoyed these quite a lot.Next up is Thomas Picketty's "Capital in the 21st century"


Ahhh, I'd at least keep going to The Wastelands before taking a break; IMO it's the best in The Dark Tower series if not one of the best Stephen King books period. Beautifully fleshes out the world/atmosphere from the first two books without getting stuck a bit far up its own asshole like the later books did.
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theposega
Poser Slayer Grindman Arselick Level X

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PostPosted: Thu Jun 26, 2014 11:52 pm 
 

Finished Robert Jordan's The Eye of the World yesterday. Borrowed a little too much from LOTR for my liking, though it did seem to fade (HA!) as the plot went on. But the whole trollocs/fades/draghkar stuff I thought was really well done, pretty suspenseful at times.

Right now though I'm roughly 130 pages into A Game of Thrones and goddamn. My biggest gripe so far is that, as a nonwatcher of the show, I hate how I can only picture Daenerys and Tyrion as the actors that play them.
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iamntbatman
Chaos Breed

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PostPosted: Fri Jun 27, 2014 8:46 am 
 

Stop right there with Wheel of Time! It's alllllllll downhill after that.
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Abominatrix
Harbinger of Metal

Joined: Fri Oct 24, 2003 12:15 pm
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PostPosted: Fri Jun 27, 2014 2:58 pm 
 

iamntbatman wrote:
Well it's not really sci-fi at all but I can't recommend the Titus Groan books enough. All three were absolutely sublime but the second especially was seriously life-affirming/altering shit for me. Really kicking myself for not having read those books when I was younger.



yes, to GOrmenghast!

Also R. A. Lafferty could be a good addition to that list there, as failsafe might agree.
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failsafeman
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PostPosted: Fri Jun 27, 2014 4:52 pm 
 

Abominatrix wrote:
Also R. A. Lafferty could be a good addition to that list there, as failsafe might agree.

Oh for sure. The best place to start is probably one of the short story collections, like Nine Hundred Grandmothers. His style works best in the short story format, I think. I've read some of his novels, and while they're certainly far from bad, they end up being very dense and incredibly bewildering. In Fourth Mansions for example it's hard to even really understand what the fuck is going on, as it's this intentionally absurd mess of layered conspiracies and ancient orders and psychic powers, all viewed through the kaleidoscope of Lafferty's ridiculous humor and obscure allusions. I liked the book but damn, it was like an intense drug trip; something I'm glad I experienced but am in absolutely no hurry to repeat. The short stories on the other hand are usually far more accessible and easier to digest. Also, the humor often comes across far more directly. Here's the opening to the titular story in Nine Hundred Grandmothers, and it reads like the Space Mutiny episode in MST3K:

Spoiler: show
Ceran Swicegood was a promising young Special Aspects Man. But,
like all Special Aspects, he had one irritating habit. He was forever
asking the questions: How Did It All Begin?

They all had tough names except Ceran. Manbreaker Crag, Heave
Huckle, Blast Berg, George Blood, Move Manion (when Move says
"Move," you move), Trouble Trent. They were supposed to be tough,
and they had taken tough names at the naming. Only Ceran kept his
own-to the disgust of his commander, Manbreaker.

"Nobody can be a hero with a name like Ceran Swicegood!"
Manbreaker would thunder. "Why don't you take Storm Shannon?
That's good. Or Gutboy Barrelhouse or Slash Slagle or Nevel Knife?
You barely glanced at the suggested list."

"I'll keep my own," Ceran always said, and this is where he made his
mistake. A new name will sometimes bring out a new personality. It
had done so for George Blood. Though the hair on George's chest was a
graft job, yet that and his new name had turned him from a boy into a
man. Had Ceran assumed the heroic name of Gutboy Barrelhouse he
might have been capable of rousing endeavors and man-sized angers
rather than his tittering indecisions and flouncy furies.
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theposega
Poser Slayer Grindman Arselick Level X

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PostPosted: Fri Jun 27, 2014 11:21 pm 
 

iamntbatman wrote:
Stop right there with Wheel of Time! It's alllllllll downhill after that.


I'll probably give the next two a shot since I bought a box set of the first three, but I have no idea when. Cause I'll probably steamroll through A Song of Ice and Fire and then I got the next Stormlight Archive book to read, plus I need to start reading the Malazan novels again...

Yeah, it's going to be a while before I get to them.
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iamntbatman
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PostPosted: Mon Jun 30, 2014 10:32 am 
 

Alllright, so this dude at work just stopped by my desk and saw my copy of The Silmarillion and asked if I'm into fantasy in general or just Tolkien in particular, so when I told him I like fantasy in general he recommended I read Stephen R. Donaldson's The Chronicles of Thomas Covenant novels (or, he says, just the first three since they go downhill after that). Can any of you vouch for him? Even the Wikipedia page for the series doesn't have the nicest things to say in the "Critical Reception" section...
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Azmodes
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PostPosted: Mon Jun 30, 2014 11:11 am 
 

I remember fsm speaking quite highly of them, though I too have heard that things go downhill later on. I've been planning to check out the series myself. I only know his Gap novels, which I thought were pretty good and sort of refreshing/unique in their level of ruthlessness and utter brutality. There's megatons of characters ANGSTurbating, though, which can get quite tedious. From what I've heard, the Covenant books have that problem as well.
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Nahsil
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PostPosted: Mon Jun 30, 2014 11:49 am 
 

I have Thomas Covenant on my wishlist I think, I'd heard good things.
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failsafeman
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PostPosted: Mon Jun 30, 2014 3:08 pm 
 

iamntbatman wrote:
Alllright, so this dude at work just stopped by my desk and saw my copy of The Silmarillion and asked if I'm into fantasy in general or just Tolkien in particular, so when I told him I like fantasy in general he recommended I read Stephen R. Donaldson's The Chronicles of Thomas Covenant novels (or, he says, just the first three since they go downhill after that). Can any of you vouch for him?

Actually I'd say pretty much the same exact thing. The first trilogy is worth reading, but everything after that isn't, really. The first trilogy is 100% self-contained, though, so it works. It's not the absolute best fantasy, and it does get fairly angsty, but Donaldson does a really good job of building an incredibly non-standard protagonist and working to get you into his head. It's the typical "real life dude transported to a fantasy setting and is the chosen one" as was quite popular then (thanks mostly to Poul Anderson's Three Hearts and Three Lions), but it's atypical in that instead of a manly hero or a credulous young boy or whatever, it's this bitter failed author whose life is a complete mess because he has leprosy. He 100% doesn't buy into the world being real and wants no part of being the chosen one and is generally kind of a cunt, but his cuntiness makes sense, because he's convinced it's this bizarre delusion.

The world building is interesting, and stays far away from typical elves and dwarves and whatever. The only cliche thing about it really is that there's a Dark Lord, and if you can get over him being named Lord Foul, everything else works pretty well. Not top-shelf, Gene Wolfe level fantasy, but still solid and worth reading.
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iamntbatman
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PostPosted: Tue Jul 01, 2014 10:21 am 
 

Alright, sounds cool. New recommendation from this same guy: Robert Merle's Malevil, which is some sort of French post-apocalyptic novel that came up in a conversation about A Canticle for Liebowitz.
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narsilianshard
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Joined: Fri Aug 14, 2009 12:22 pm
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Location: Seattle
PostPosted: Tue Jul 01, 2014 4:41 pm 
 

Smoking_Gnu wrote:
Scorntyrant wrote:
Just finished the first 2 books in Stephen King's Dark Tower cycle, "The Gunslinger" and "The drawing of the three" . Actually enjoyed these quite a lot.Next up is Thomas Picketty's "Capital in the 21st century"


Ahhh, I'd at least keep going to The Wastelands before taking a break; IMO it's the best in The Dark Tower series if not one of the best Stephen King books period. Beautifully fleshes out the world/atmosphere from the first two books without getting stuck a bit far up its own asshole like the later books did.


Agreed, and even the two after that are fantastic. This is where the series starts to get really interesting/insane/fun.
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Rasc
Metal newbie

Joined: Thu Dec 16, 2010 9:19 am
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Location: Brazil
PostPosted: Wed Jul 02, 2014 10:15 am 
 

I'm reading at the same time the book "Venus in Furs", by Sacher-Masoch (great book, not exactly perverted, but erotic and intelligent in reasonable amounts) and a compilation of all works by the poet Cruz e Sousa (indispensable if you can read Portuguese)

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Nahsil
Clerical Sturmgeschütz

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PostPosted: Wed Jul 02, 2014 12:06 pm 
 

Decided I'm gonna read Zelazny's Lord of Light, because I hear it's great and I love Eastern religion/philosophy. Heinlein's Stranger was actually the last scifi I read...any other essential scifi books with Eastern themes?
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RedMisanthrope
Poet Laureate of the Old Ones

Joined: Sat May 19, 2007 1:53 pm
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PostPosted: Wed Jul 02, 2014 9:01 pm 
 

Nahsil wrote:
Decided I'm gonna read Zelazny's Lord of Light, because I hear it's great and I love Eastern religion/philosophy. Heinlein's Stranger was actually the last scifi I read...any other essential scifi books with Eastern themes?


Yeah, Lord of Light rocks. Can't go wrong with Buddhists vs Hindu gods.
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Scorntyrant
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PostPosted: Thu Jul 03, 2014 2:24 am 
 

Got a bit stalled with Picketty due to starting "Call me Burroughs: a life" by Barry Miles. Probably only interesting if you are already a fan of William Burroughs' writing, but I'm halfway through its 736 pages and it's fantastic.
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Turner
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Joined: Fri Aug 23, 2002 2:04 am
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PostPosted: Thu Jul 03, 2014 4:38 am 
 

iamntbatman wrote:
Alllright, so this dude at work just stopped by my desk and saw my copy of The Silmarillion and asked if I'm into fantasy in general or just Tolkien in particular, so when I told him I like fantasy in general he recommended I read Stephen R. Donaldson's The Chronicles of Thomas Covenant novels (or, he says, just the first three since they go downhill after that). Can any of you vouch for him? Even the Wikipedia page for the series doesn't have the nicest things to say in the "Critical Reception" section...


i read the first ~1.5 thomas covenant books and tbh i struggled even to get that far. the story is convoluted and fragmented, like he made it up as it went along. you know those RPGs where each quest is just a lead-in to another quest and you spend like 600 hours collecting books and sticks and staves and different types of elf blood, to the point that you forget what the original goal was? that's what reading that piece of shit was like. covenant is thoroughly unlikeable as a character, too. to its credit, the fantasy world isn't so obviously tolkien-based as most 80s-onwards fantasy authors, but that's about it. someone (pretty sure it was macmoney) made the point last time i bagged the series that the real literary worth is in covenant and his relationship with the world around him (that's about as good as i can do without spoilers) but all the same, i wouldn't recommend it.

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iamntbatman
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PostPosted: Thu Jul 03, 2014 8:56 am 
 

Sorry, gonna have to take failsy's endorsement of them over your critique :P

Anyone read Robert Merle's Malevil?
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DisembowelMe
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PostPosted: Thu Jul 03, 2014 1:39 pm 
 

Finished William Peter Blatty's The Exorcist just recently. It didn't quite hit the "horror" spot of my probably desensitized psyche, me being quite accustomed to and bored by the axis of "God (good) vs. the Devil (evil)", demonic possessions and other such vintage western storytelling devices, but I at least found it to be a pleasing, sometimes gripping, mystery novel. Even knowing the basic outcome of the story beforehand, the confusion and anxiety of the main characters kept the story going forward, and the skepticism against any sort of supernatural happenings was convincing even though the book was clearly written from a christian standpoint.

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failsafeman
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PostPosted: Thu Jul 03, 2014 2:09 pm 
 

iamntbatman wrote:
Anyone read Robert Merle's Malevil?

Sorry man I haven't even read A Canticle for Liebowitz yet, though I own it. Come to think of it, the only post-apocalyptic novel I've read is The Road, and maybe Oryx & Crake and its sequel, if you count that. Just never ended up exploring it that much.
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Despumation
Mallcore Kid

Joined: Thu Jul 03, 2014 3:36 pm
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Location: Pittsburgh, Pa, United States
PostPosted: Thu Jul 03, 2014 5:09 pm 
 

Oooo, excited there's a lit thread here. I've been really busy lately, so much of my reading's been sort of work-related non-fiction. But when things settle down a bit and I've got the luxury of extra time, I'll get back into fiction and have something to contribute here. I mean, I'm reading Mary Rickert's The Memory Garden right now, and it's good, but it's pretty chick-oriented, which I'm not normally drawn to, but I like the author...it's got supernatural elements, and murder and mystery, which is fun. Well written.
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Rompestromper
Metal newbie

Joined: Mon Jun 23, 2014 2:37 pm
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Location: Netherlands
PostPosted: Fri Jul 04, 2014 8:26 am 
 

I am reading the full Dr. Thorndyke series which are sightly written in an overlapping time with Sherlock Holmes, however this one is written by someone who actually performed the science he wrote in his books. Since I am employed with roughly the same job, that makes it even more interesting.
For those who are into the dark ages stories, I can really recommend a Dutch book: 'The Letter for the King' which has recently been translated in English and appears in quite some different languages already. Though it is not exactly an adult book, it sure reads like one. My favourite book of all time!

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failsafeman
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PostPosted: Fri Jul 04, 2014 3:34 pm 
 

Right now I'm slogging through Something Wicked This Way Comes, and I guess I'm one of the people who just really doesn't like Bradbury's overwritten, overpoetic style. I've read/enjoyed some of his short stories, but for this one it's like he went over every sentence and tried to write everything as metaphorically and obtusely as possible, which is doubly stupid because it's a story set in a bog-standard small town. It would have been much better served with standard prose, I think, maybe ramping up into the lyrical stuff when the weird carnival shit goes down, but nope. Ironically, I chose this book to read next because it's short (~200 pages in my edition) and wanted a quick read. After a week, I'm only about halfway through. So it goes.

Also, before this I finished Philip Pullman's The Amber Spyglass, and thought it was a steaming pile of shit. A tremendously disappointing finale to an otherwise quite decent trilogy. So it goes.
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Nahsil
Clerical Sturmgeschütz

Joined: Sun Jan 08, 2006 2:06 pm
Posts: 3867
Location: United States
PostPosted: Fri Jul 04, 2014 6:43 pm 
 

RedMisanthrope wrote:
Nahsil wrote:
Decided I'm gonna read Zelazny's Lord of Light, because I hear it's great and I love Eastern religion/philosophy. Heinlein's Stranger was actually the last scifi I read...any other essential scifi books with Eastern themes?


Yeah, Lord of Light rocks. Can't go wrong with Buddhists vs Hindu gods.


I'm familiar with the Hindu Trimurti - Brahma/Vishnu/Shiva, and Brahman/Atman...I think maybe that's it though for Buddhist/Hindu DEITIES. I'm familiar with the general metaphysical views and stuff pretty well. Am I not going to get the references? :(
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RedMisanthrope
Poet Laureate of the Old Ones

Joined: Sat May 19, 2007 1:53 pm
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Location: United States of America
PostPosted: Sat Jul 05, 2014 5:20 pm 
 

You probably know more about that stuff than I do, and I was able to follow along just fine. The book's language is exotic at times, but not inaccessible.
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BloodSacrificeShaman
Leopold Herman Stotch

Joined: Wed May 11, 2011 3:20 am
Posts: 2006
Location: Australia
PostPosted: Thu Jul 10, 2014 4:34 am 
 

I've started reading a sci-fi fantasy series called The Horseclans by Robert Adams, with the first book being Coming of the Horseclans. Haven't finished it yet, but I'm about halfway and loving it. Got so hooked on it, it was about 6 AM before I put it down. It's a post-apocalyptic story with the protagonists being a group of Scythian/Hun/Mongol influenced horse nomads. There's a bit of fantasy involved with some telepathy and intelligent animals (horses and fucking sabretooth-tigers!). I'm really digging it so far.

Also, the cover art is absolutely awesome and old school sword and sorcery as fuck!

Spoiler: show
Image


I've also got myself a copy of Michael Moorcock's Elric of Melnibone and Other Stories, the first in a re-issued set of the Elric saga. Was inspired by Cirith Ungol's album covers to give it a read (unfortunately, the book re-issues don't have that artwork). So far, I haven't gotten to the meat of it yet, but it seems interesting what with the whole multiverse and cosmos walking sort of stuff. Reminds me of the setting of the game Planescape: Torment.
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Darth Bathory
Mallcore Kid

Joined: Sat Jun 21, 2014 7:17 pm
Posts: 11
PostPosted: Fri Jul 11, 2014 6:09 am 
 

BloodSacrificeShaman wrote:
I've also got myself a copy of Michael Moorcock's Elric of Melnibone and Other Stories, the first in a re-issued set of the Elric saga. Was inspired by Cirith Ungol's album covers to give it a read (unfortunately, the book re-issues don't have that artwork). So far, I haven't gotten to the meat of it yet, but it seems interesting what with the whole multiverse and cosmos walking sort of stuff. Reminds me of the setting of the game Planescape: Torment.

The Elric saga is pretty compulsive reading. By the time you hit The Weird Of The White Wolf, The Vanishing Tower and The Bane Of The Black Sword, you should find 'em pretty hard to put down.
This next tag contains massive spoilers, by the way; avoid until after you've read the novels, then come back and tell me what you think.
Spoiler: show
They gather momentum, gradually at first, and then as Elric's second nemesis Theleb Ka'arna digs himself in deeper with the forces of Chaos, everything spirals rapidly and completely out of control leading to a climax that is literally apocalyptic.


If you dig the Elric saga, definitely get on to Moorcock's other great saga, Hawkmoon - the saga of The Runestaff is what you're after. Top-shelf stuff; I re-read them all last year around Xmas time to a soundtrack of Cathedral's collected works. Kinda worked well.
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Implar
Metal newbie

Joined: Sun May 16, 2010 4:50 am
Posts: 89
Location: Belgium
PostPosted: Mon Jul 14, 2014 6:21 pm 
 

I was wondering if any of you are reading while listening to (background) music. I picked A Clash of Kings today but was to distracted by cars, neighbors,… so I listened to some Wolves in the Throne Room and Bongripper, which worked out great! Any of you also have this habit, if so, what do you listen to?

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iamntbatman
Chaos Breed

Joined: Sat Feb 21, 2009 5:55 am
Posts: 7986
Location: Innsmouth
PostPosted: Mon Jul 14, 2014 11:15 pm 
 

Nope, definitely cannot listen to music while reading. I can really only concentrate on one thing at a time, I guess.
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dystopia4
Thumbman

Joined: Mon Nov 16, 2009 6:47 pm
Posts: 3571
Location: Canada
PostPosted: Mon Jul 14, 2014 11:27 pm 
 

I pretty much always put on some music when I read, although it tends to be on the atmospheric side of things, as more active music is generally distracting (especially with prominent, discernable vocals). Black metal is generally my go-to, although I generally spin The Gun Club when reading anything Western-tinged.
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