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Panflute
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Joined: Sun Mar 15, 2009 11:11 am
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PostPosted: Sat May 11, 2013 12:54 pm 
 

Anyone know of a source other than Worldcat and the usual search engines to find out if a work has been translated into English?

I need English translations of the short stories Blokken and Bint by Ferdinand Bordewijk, but so far I can't find any, and I'm not particularly looking forward to having to produce translations myself.
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espinafri
Mallcore Kid

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PostPosted: Mon May 13, 2013 12:44 pm 
 

I´m looking an easy book to read, on the line of Harry Potter or Percy Jackson. Anybody has any recommendation?
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Grave_Wyrm
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PostPosted: Mon May 13, 2013 12:54 pm 
 

espinafri wrote:
I´m looking an easy book to read

If you're looking for fantasy, I liked The Wizard Knight by Gene Wolfe, and I didn't have any trouble at all reading A Song of Ice and Fire. That was quite easy. Easy-enough sci-fi: Triton by Samuel Delany. .. Kind of drawing a blank here because most of the books I read tend to be "hard" to read, which i think is why so many go unfinished. :(

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espinafri
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Joined: Wed Jun 06, 2012 12:02 pm
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PostPosted: Mon May 13, 2013 1:30 pm 
 

Grave_Wyrm wrote:
espinafri wrote:
I´m looking an easy book to read

If you're looking for fantasy, I liked The Wizard Knight by Gene Wolfe, and I didn't have any trouble at all reading A Song of Ice and Fire. That was quite easy. Easy-enough sci-fi: Triton by Samuel Delany. .. Kind of drawing a blank here because most of the books I read tend to be "hard" to read, which i think is why so many go unfinished. :(


A song of ice and fire would be cool, but i already read them.

Do you know any other violent and sexual medieval fantasy of the sort?
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inhumanist
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PostPosted: Mon May 13, 2013 3:06 pm 
 

Violent and sexual medieval fantasy? Check out Karl Edward Wagner's "Kane" books. They're pretty great.
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Abominatrix
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Joined: Fri Oct 24, 2003 12:15 pm
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PostPosted: Mon May 13, 2013 3:26 pm 
 

espinafri wrote:
Do you know any other violent and sexual medieval fantasy of the sort?



Oooh, how about the Gor books? :D
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espinafri
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Joined: Wed Jun 06, 2012 12:02 pm
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PostPosted: Mon May 13, 2013 3:33 pm 
 

Abominatrix wrote:
espinafri wrote:
Do you know any other violent and sexual medieval fantasy of the sort?


Oooh, how about the Gor books? :D


That does not sound good.
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Erdrickgr
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PostPosted: Mon May 13, 2013 3:42 pm 
 

espinafri wrote:
That does not sound good.


Perhaps start with something a bit more realistic then? Story of O? :-D
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espinafri
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PostPosted: Mon May 13, 2013 5:26 pm 
 

Erdrickgr wrote:
Perhaps start with something a bit more realistic then? Story of O? :-D


Jeez. I´m not looking for erotic stuff specifically.

I mentioned "sex and violence" because i don´t things in lines of lord of the rings.
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Nahsil
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PostPosted: Mon May 13, 2013 10:13 pm 
 

Grave_Wyrm wrote:
espinafri wrote:
I´m looking an easy book to read

If you're looking for fantasy, I liked The Wizard Knight by Gene Wolfe, and I didn't have any trouble at all reading A Song of Ice and Fire. That was quite easy. Easy-enough sci-fi: Triton by Samuel Delany. .. Kind of drawing a blank here because most of the books I read tend to be "hard" to read, which i think is why so many go unfinished. :(


Gene Wolfe wrote something that could be considered "easy reading"?! I've still only read Book of the New Sun.
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failsafeman
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PostPosted: Mon May 13, 2013 11:36 pm 
 

It's readable, but by fantasy standards it's definitely not easy reading. There are tons of questions left up to the reader to solve. It's also very very good, possibly my favorite of all of Gene Wolfe's stuff, and if not it's certainly tied for the best. He does a great great job of intentionally tackling nearly every heroic fantasy trope and turning them into something new and original; not just a simple subversion, but really making them feel fresh, while still preserving their spirit. Dragons, ogres, elves, wizards, knights, gods, giants, witches, they're all there, but definitely not like what you're expecting.
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espinafri
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PostPosted: Tue May 14, 2013 10:14 am 
 

Anybody read any of those?

Kushiel's Legacy (Jacqueline Carey)
A Tale of the King's Blades (Dave Duncan)
The Long Price Quartet (Daniel Abraham)
Chronicles of Amber (Roger Zelazny)
7Tales of the Dying Earth (Jack Vance)
The Dresden Files (Jim Butcher)
The Book of Jhereg (Steven Brust)
The Summoner (Chronicles of the Necromancer, #1) by Gail Z. Martin
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Abominatrix
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PostPosted: Tue May 14, 2013 10:51 am 
 

espinafri wrote:
Anybody read any of those?

Kushiel's Legacy (Jacqueline Carey)
A Tale of the King's Blades (Dave Duncan)
The Long Price Quartet (Daniel Abraham)
Chronicles of Amber (Roger Zelazny)
7Tales of the Dying Earth (Jack Vance)
The Dresden Files (Jim Butcher)
The Book of Jhereg (Steven Brust)
The Summoner (Chronicles of the Necromancer, #1) by Gail Z. Martin


The quality of stuff in that list is all over the place.

We have had a lot of Vance talk in here, and the Dying Earth is among my favourite of the stuff that he's written. Nothing like Ice and Fire or Harry Potter though, and not much sex either. Great use of language however, lots of dry humour and wit, many, many strange creatures and societies.

Been thinking of giving Zelazny's Amber serries another try myself. I really admire Zelazny but have had trouble with some of his fiction in the past. he's certainly very clever, and should probably be counted among the pantheon of literary SF/Fantasy authors.
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failsafeman
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PostPosted: Tue May 14, 2013 1:29 pm 
 

Abominatrix wrote:
Been thinking of giving Zelazny's Amber serries another try myself. I really admire Zelazny but have had trouble with some of his fiction in the past. he's certainly very clever, and should probably be counted among the pantheon of literary SF/Fantasy authors.

Zelazny is kind of like Michael Moorcock and a lot of other early career sci-fi/fantasy authors who had to pump out lots of material to make a living: he wrote a lot of good stuff but a lot of bad stuff too, and you really need to be careful what you pick. I've read the whole Chronicles of Amber for example and it starts out great (I actually read the first book in one sitting), but then it gradually slides downhill until it's just kind of...there...by the end. People always cite the change of protagonists from Corwin to his son Merlin halfway through as the "jump the shark" moment, but honestly that just seems like a convenient change to pin the blame on. I'd actually put the peak around the middle of book 2. I love the concept of this immortal family of bitchy, selfish royalty with hundreds of years of grudges and intrigues that play out across an infinite number of universes, but rather than making the whole thing character-driven like in the first two books it ends up opting for some sort of cosmic struggle that's just not as interesting. It's to the point where I almost feel compelled to re-write the rest of the Chronicles because of how annoyed I am at how the great concept and setup ended up being squandered. On the other hand, I thought Lord of Light and Isle of the Dead were pretty darn good all the way through. Zelazny is one author where reading reviews prior to making a selection is really helpful.
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Ilwhyan
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PostPosted: Tue May 14, 2013 2:19 pm 
 

espinafri wrote:
Erdrickgr wrote:
Perhaps start with something a bit more realistic then? Story of O? :-D


Jeez. I´m not looking for erotic stuff specifically.

I mentioned "sex and violence" because i don´t things in lines of lord of the rings.

George RR Martin's series would fit your bill. If you're looking for higher quality stuff with less gloss on the grotesque (and, in turn, much more sinister atmosphere), go for Jack Vance's Lyonesse. Vance isn't as easy to read, but he's immensely rewarding, especially compared to Martin. I haven't read much by Vance, but so far he's the most bitter and disillusioned writer I know. If Martin is said to kill important characters liberally, I'd say Vance's habits are even more upsetting. Vance seems to love crushing innocent dreams and to emphasise the cruelty of everything. There is justice, often, but not always before horrible things happen, and there are places where you can tell he has intentionally set up situations where they happen to utterly undeserving people.
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Abominatrix
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PostPosted: Tue May 14, 2013 3:52 pm 
 

That's definitely true of Vance...in the Derdain trilogy too in particular. From one point near the end of the second book onwards it's pretty unfair stuff. The end of the last Dying Earth book, Rhialto the Marvelous, is a real downer, I think, and it's all the more striking because the rest of the book has been so much fun.
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Grave_Wyrm
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PostPosted: Tue May 14, 2013 10:01 pm 
 

I've heard similar things about the Hunger Games books. Apparently it's basically all downhill. It was described to me by a friend who read it back to back as "the most depressing series I've ever read."

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Empyreal
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PostPosted: Tue May 14, 2013 10:39 pm 
 

Grave_Wyrm wrote:
I've heard similar things about the Hunger Games books. Apparently it's basically all downhill. It was described to me by a friend who read it back to back as "the most depressing series I've ever read."


They get better in quality with each book, but yeah, it's pretty dark. I don't think it's necessarily all depressing...the end is resolution enough. But the series really is very well done, and I'd say check it out if you get a chance.

Started Roberto Bolano's 2666 the other day...this will likely be a big monumental trip.
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RedMisanthrope
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PostPosted: Wed May 15, 2013 2:58 am 
 

Empyreal wrote:
Started Roberto Bolano's 2666 the other day...this will likely be a big monumental trip.


Oh yes, you're in for quite a trip. Have something to drink when you get to "The Part about the Crimes"; a few scenes from that have stayed with me.
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bloodycumshit
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PostPosted: Wed May 15, 2013 3:10 am 
 

lurkist wrote:
Greg Bear's Eon is superb, and in case people don't know is part of a trilogy of sorts also comprising Eternity (pretty good) and Legacy (very good).

Noticed a mention of Ramsey Campbell, he is one of the very few writers I simply cannot stomach. His style and technique are atrocious, virtually unreadable. I feel similarly about James Herbert. It's very rare that I give up on a book part way - I usually battle on to the end - but in both these writer's cases, I simply had better things to do.



Couldn't agree more, Ramsey Campbell is very average and has a horrible writing style.
If ya want to read good horror read jack ketchum, joe hill, or Richard layman or someone, there's so much more better options for horror authors.

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bloodycumshit
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PostPosted: Wed May 15, 2013 3:13 am 
 

Has anyone one read any 'Tad Williams' ?
wife just brought a hole lot of his books home from the book fair, along with some Bernard Cornwell, haven't read anything from him either.

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Abominatrix
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PostPosted: Wed May 15, 2013 10:26 am 
 

bloodycumshit wrote:
lurkist wrote:
Greg Bear's Eon is superb, and in case people don't know is part of a trilogy of sorts also comprising Eternity (pretty good) and Legacy (very good).

Noticed a mention of Ramsey Campbell, he is one of the very few writers I simply cannot stomach. His style and technique are atrocious, virtually unreadable. I feel similarly about James Herbert. It's very rare that I give up on a book part way - I usually battle on to the end - but in both these writer's cases, I simply had better things to do.



Couldn't agree more, Ramsey Campbell is very average and has a horrible writing style.
If ya want to read good horror read jack ketchum, joe hill, or Richard layman or someone, there's so much more better options for horror authors.



Layman a better writer than Ramsey campbell? You guys, you guys...*sigh*
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failsafeman
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PostPosted: Wed May 15, 2013 12:06 pm 
 

What, you mean bloodycumshit isn't the guy to listen to for literary recommendations??
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Abominatrix
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PostPosted: Wed May 15, 2013 12:28 pm 
 

failsafeman wrote:
What, you mean bloodycumshit isn't the guy to listen to for literary recommendations??



I didn't realise until afterwards, and then remembered some of his early posts. yeah...
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Napero
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PostPosted: Wed May 15, 2013 1:40 pm 
 

Two weeks ago I finished a re-read of David Zindell's Requiem for Homo Sapiens trilogy, a rather massive sequel to the single-book Neverness, which I absolutely love. The series is perhaps a bit too massive for its content, and while the basic idea of Neverness, a fantastic universe that only serves as a backdrop for a bunch of philosophical thoughts, is preserved in the trilogy, it's perhaps spread a bit too thin in the process. Condensing the content of the series into two books would have made sense and improved the whole, there's not enough butter to cover the whole bread here. Yes, there are wonderful visions of the future, of nebula-sized entities called gods, dystopias loved by their inhabitants, ideas of a dark futures, and the recurring shamanistic caveman themes that contrast with the technocratic world of the future, but somehow the philosophy that has an appearance of being deeper than in the original masterpiece has actually become more contrived and superficial once the details are added.

Also, certain discussions and relationships are not credible, and despite the complexities of the two main characters, their relationship is something that turns too convoluted to believe in the end of the first book, essentially. And the last 15 pages contain a plot twist that must have been an afterthought... No way that was intended from the beginning, or certain earlier parts would include some hints to it. But there are none...

Recommended with a caveat, but read Neverness first and see if you like it, before investing in three paperbacks and a massive amount of time.
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bloodycumshit
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PostPosted: Wed May 15, 2013 2:23 pm 
 

Abominatrix wrote:
failsafeman wrote:
What, you mean bloodycumshit isn't the guy to listen to for literary recommendations??



I didn't realise until afterwards, and then remembered some of his early posts. yeah...



we are not talking about my skills in writing, and it's not all about literary skills the story might mater too :roll: richard layman shits on ramsey campell, you guys obviously don't know your horror authors if you think he is any good. I could name a dozen better horror authors than him off the top of my head

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Grave_Wyrm
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PostPosted: Wed May 15, 2013 3:25 pm 
 

^ Go for it .. I've hardly read any good horror. Could use a list.

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bloodycumshit
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PostPosted: Thu May 16, 2013 2:59 am 
 

Grave_Wyrm wrote:
^ Go for it .. I've hardly read any good horror. Could use a list.


as i said Joe hill ( Stephen kings son ) jack ketchum and here's some other's.

Tim Lebbon
John Skipp
Kim Newman
Neil Gaiman
James Herbert
John Saul
Joe.R Lansdsale
Christopher Fowler
Brian Lumley
Peter Straub
(early) Clive Barker
Thomas Legotti
Robert R McCammon
Graham Masterton
Caitlin R Kernan

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Nahsil
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PostPosted: Thu May 16, 2013 3:22 am 
 

Joe Lansdale is a professor at the university I just graduated from. I dated a creative writer and I'm currently rooming with another creative writer; both took classes with him. Interesting guy.
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bloodycumshit
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PostPosted: Thu May 16, 2013 3:34 am 
 

Nahsil wrote:
Joe Lansdale is a professor at the university I just graduated from. I dated a creative writer and I'm currently rooming with another creative writer; both took classes with him. Interesting guy.


:o wow! that is very cool, your very lucky.

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Disinterested Handjob
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PostPosted: Thu May 16, 2013 4:02 am 
 

I finished the much lauded Robopocalypse by Daniel H Wilson last night. I'm not sure what the fuss is about. For a start it's pretty much just a version of World War Z with robots, right down to a mystical Japanese character. Easy read. Not memorable. Unimpressed.
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Napero
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PostPosted: Thu May 16, 2013 5:49 am 
 

bloodycumshit wrote:
Brian Lumley

Not worth much, IMO. He mostly emulates Lovecraft and Derleth on his good days, but manages to botch up the whole basic idea by letting people have a fighting chance. Which is blasphemy! Most of that is like Call of Cthulhu RPG run by a game master that has no idea of how the game should be run. The other end of his books (what little I've read) is something like the Necroscope series, and that particular series has a nice basic premise, some interesting scenes in the first 200 pages, and then he just keeps watering it down for 32200 pages, turning it once again into a bad RPG narrative. Not worth your time, I think.

bloodycumshit wrote:
(early) Clive Barker

This, on the other hand, is true. Barker's Books of Blood is something I'll need to return to after two decades, although I will read the Song of Ice and Fire series first (so it will actually be a break of three decades...). Everything up to Weaveworld is worthy reading, and even some of the later dark fantasy tales are OK. Somehow he started to repeat himself after Weaveworld, though, and mystical strange worlds were being discovered everywhere after that... But enjoy the first three novels and all the shorties in the BoB series, they are good stuff!
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waiguoren
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PostPosted: Thu May 16, 2013 9:23 am 
 

Interesting that Richard Laymon has been mentioned. I went through a stage during my early teens where I read every book of his that the library had. It's b-grade horror stuff, simply written and mostly predictable, relying on 'shocking' things happening to keep the reader entertained. I can't see myself as an adult enjoying any of his stuff, maybe as a quick read on a flight with no leg room and lots of turbulence or while recovering from major heart surgery, I don't know. He never sold well in the States I think, most of his income came from his sales in England or something like that.

I'm currently taking a break from the Malazan series by Erikson, the seventh book will just have to wait I'm afraid as I'm getting tired of the series, and all the characters, and not knowing what is important and what's not - it seems like he wrote the series with the intention of making you go back and re-reading it to piece it all together properly. I like the Tiste Edur though, for some reason I feel like I can relate to them, but for the life of me can't work out why. I'm going to start reading the first book in Zelazny's Amber series, if failsafeman says a book is good, it damned well is. I enjoyed Lord Of Light when I read it, so I know Zelazny's got the skills, but I need to know for sure that he can top Richard Laymon in the writing department or else 2013 will not be complete.
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Abominatrix
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PostPosted: Thu May 16, 2013 10:25 am 
 

waiguoren wrote:
Interesting that Richard Laymon has been mentioned. I went through a stage during my early teens where I read every book of his that the library had. It's b-grade horror stuff, simply written and mostly predictable, relying on 'shocking' things happening to keep the reader entertained. I can't see myself as an adult enjoying any of his stuff, maybe as a quick read on a flight with no leg room and lots of turbulence or while recovering from major heart surgery, I don't know. He never sold well in the States I think, most of his income came from his sales in England or something like that.

I'm currently taking a break from the Malazan series by Erikson, the seventh book will just have to wait I'm afraid as I'm getting tired of the series, and all the characters, and not knowing what is important and what's not - it seems like he wrote the series with the intention of making you go back and re-reading it to piece it all together properly. I like the Tiste Edur though, for some reason I feel like I can relate to them, but for the life of me can't work out why. I'm going to start reading the first book in Zelazny's Amber series, if failsafeman says a book is good, it damned well is. I enjoyed Lord Of Light when I read it, so I know Zelazny's got the skills, but I need to know for sure that he can top Richard Laymon in the writing department or else 2013 will not be complete.



hhaaa, well I really don't think you have any worries there, man!

THose writers BLoodycum listed are all voer the place, stylistically, quality-wise, etc. Have you really read and enjoyed all of them equally, BCS?

Napero, I agree about LUmley. BUrrowers Beneath was very disappointing. Basically Lovecraft fanfic, as you said. Not sure why I expected something more. The best thing I've read by him is probably a short piece called "Fruiting Bodies", and even that was only ok. Never finished the first Necroscope book.
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bloodycumshit
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PostPosted: Thu May 16, 2013 2:31 pm 
 

Abominatrix wrote:
waiguoren wrote:
Interesting that Richard Laymon has been mentioned. I went through a stage during my early teens where I read every book of his that the library had. It's b-grade horror stuff, simply written and mostly predictable, relying on 'shocking' things happening to keep the reader entertained. I can't see myself as an adult enjoying any of his stuff, maybe as a quick read on a flight with no leg room and lots of turbulence or while recovering from major heart surgery, I don't know. He never sold well in the States I think, most of his income came from his sales in England or something like that.

I'm currently taking a break from the Malazan series by Erikson, the seventh book will just have to wait I'm afraid as I'm getting tired of the series, and all the characters, and not knowing what is important and what's not - it seems like he wrote the series with the intention of making you go back and re-reading it to piece it all together properly. I like the Tiste Edur though, for some reason I feel like I can relate to them, but for the life of me can't work out why. I'm going to start reading the first book in Zelazny's Amber series, if failsafeman says a book is good, it damned well is. I enjoyed Lord Of Light when I read it, so I know Zelazny's got the skills, but I need to know for sure that he can top Richard Laymon in the writing department or else 2013 will not be complete.



hhaaa, well I really don't think you have any worries there, man!

THose writers BLoodycum listed are all voer the place, stylistically, quality-wise, etc. Have you really read and enjoyed all of them equally, BCS?

Napero, I agree about LUmley. BUrrowers Beneath was very disappointing. Basically Lovecraft fanfic, as you said. Not sure why I expected something more. The best thing I've read by him is probably a short piece called "Fruiting Bodies", and even that was only ok. Never finished the first Necroscope book.


i have read at least one book from all, i like all variety's from splatter punk style like richard laymon and john skip to dark gothic shit like Thomas legotti, and the more fantasy type horror like Tim lebbon and Caitlin R Kernan.

But i am actually over horror and that's why i was wondering if anyone new about that Tad Williams guy or Bernard Cornwell, or any other decent writers in that category ?

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lurkist
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Joined: Mon May 07, 2007 7:11 pm
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PostPosted: Thu May 16, 2013 6:52 pm 
 

bloodycumshit wrote:
lurkist wrote:
Greg Bear's Eon is superb, and in case people don't know is part of a trilogy of sorts also comprising Eternity (pretty good) and Legacy (very good).

Noticed a mention of Ramsey Campbell, he is one of the very few writers I simply cannot stomach. His style and technique are atrocious, virtually unreadable. I feel similarly about James Herbert. It's very rare that I give up on a book part way - I usually battle on to the end - but in both these writer's cases, I simply had better things to do.



Couldn't agree more, Ramsey Campbell is very average and has a horrible writing style.
If ya want to read good horror read jack ketchum, joe hill, or Richard layman or someone, there's so much more better options for horror authors.



Abominatrix wrote:
Layman a better writer than Ramsey campbell? You guys, you guys...*sigh*


Indeed, a few posts later I added Layman (or Laymon as he's known) to a list of those sub-standard writers to avoid. And now that John Saul, Graham Masterton and Brian Lumley have been mentioned they can go on it too.

bloodycumshit wrote:
Has anyone one read any 'Tad Williams' ?
wife just brought a hole lot of his books home from the book fair, along with some Bernard Cornwell, haven't read anything from him either.


My ex-wife was also into him, didn't he finish a decalogy and then promptly die? Anyway, her taste was for fantasy which I can't abide, so no comment there.

Best book read of late: Inverted World by Christopher Priest. Actually a re-read (rare for me). Without giving too much away, the inhabitants of a city (either in the future or the past, it's unclear at first) are obliged to move it in a constant direction at a constant rate via rail tracks. They must build bridges, scale mountains, cross deserts. It is their destiny, and it's been this way for generations. But what will happen if they encounter an obstacle too great?
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failsafeman
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PostPosted: Thu May 16, 2013 9:00 pm 
 

I read Inverted World last year in the space of a few days, while trapped in an airplane and various airports. The concept for the city is one of many wonderfully absurd societies to come out of New Wave sci-fi - Michael Moorcock's The Ice Schooner and J G Ballard's The Concentration City are two others - and while the science of it is obviously impossible, it's just as obviously much more about the people and how their attitudes are influenced by their roles in the city. I loved all the different niches of city life he worked out; the guilds, how people inside lived, the tightly controlled living conditions. Not to spoil it for others who haven't read it, but probably the best part for me was the resolution, and how the protagonist didn't end up just being some one-dimensional hero visionary who frees his people from dystopian oppression and leads them all to a better life. Despite the absurdity and seeming adolescence of the concept, in terms of character and plot the story was surprisingly nuanced. Really those are my favorite sorts of New Wave stories: those that take the wide-eyed boyish wonder of the 40s and 50s pulps and combine them with a more mature and complex worldview.
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darkeningday
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Joined: Mon Aug 23, 2004 1:20 pm
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Location: United States
PostPosted: Sun May 19, 2013 3:45 am 
 

I really liked The Concentration City (haven't read the other two), but I thought Ballard's much later novel, High Rise, did a far better job of showing the inner workings of society through a microcosm. Have you read that one?
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Scorntyrant
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Joined: Mon Nov 15, 2004 5:55 am
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PostPosted: Sun May 19, 2013 5:39 am 
 

Re Brian Lumley: I couldnt stomach any of his Titus Crowe stories, despite a good friend with pronounced interests in talking grandfather clocks insisting that I stick with it. I thought he missed the point completely and made the mythos beings into comprehensible antagonists. However, I love his mythos short stories, fruiting bodies etc, and I really do think that the first 4 Necroscope books are a fantastic example of pure pulp storytelling. It's clunky, full of mary-sue characters and has myriad other faults, for sure. But the E-branch/Necroscope books are some of the best airport pulp fiction - so completely over the top and entertaining.

Campbell is a different beast in that he gained the critical acclaim the was beyond Lumley's reach (or due, for that matter). To be honest I prefer him as a short story writer - the mythos volume I mentioned earlier, Cold Print (and the "welcome to goatswood" compilation written in tribute) really is quite unsettling. The other 2 short story collections are very good also. But I've never been much of a fan of his as a novelist. But you have to say in his favour that his editorial work, and his work for the BBC show him as a more serious "man of letters" than Lumley.

Ballard is head and shoulders above both in the "serious writer" stakes though.

Re Tad Williams, I remember reading a book he wrote about the private lives of cats when I was a kid. If I remember correctly it got really twisted and strange at the end and the protagonist had to go to visit cat hell or something similar
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espinafri
Mallcore Kid

Joined: Wed Jun 06, 2012 12:02 pm
Posts: 26
PostPosted: Thu May 23, 2013 7:17 pm 
 

Am I a dummy or The Black Company is a HARD book?

I often have to read passages twice. And some I don´t understand at all. Crazyness
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