Encyclopaedia Metallum: The Metal Archives

Message board

* FAQ    * Search   * Register   * Login 



Reply to topic
Author Message Previous topic | Next topic
narsilianshard
Metalhead

Joined: Fri Aug 14, 2009 12:22 pm
Posts: 727
Location: Seattle
PostPosted: Thu Aug 28, 2014 7:14 pm 
 

Intraum wrote:
Converge - Jane Doe
Opeth - Blackwater Park
Mastodon - Remission or Leviathan depending on who you talk to
Pig Destroyer - Prowler in the Yard
Isis - Oceanic
Discordance Axis - The Inalienable Dreamless
Thorns - Thorns
Electric Wizard - Dopethrone

Those are just some of the obvious ones off the top of my head. Just reading around on the internet, these seem to be the albums I read a lot of people praising. I'm probably forgetting some other obvious ones like something by Meshuggah, but I don't know what the general consensus is regarding their albums even though their influence is undeniable throughout the 2000's with younger musicians.


I'd have to agree with this post the most so far. Each one of the albums either reinvented or reinvigorated a respective scene/subgenre. The one album I think people are leaving out is Agalloch's Mantle. It still remains incredibly unique and just look at the entire wave of post-black/folk/doom bands that its spark ignited.
_________________
Currently working my way through the Hammers of Misfortune discography for MetalBandcamp.

Top
 Profile  
Thiestru
Metalhead

Joined: Thu Oct 09, 2008 9:18 am
Posts: 1185
Location: United States
PostPosted: Thu Aug 28, 2014 8:40 pm 
 

Zodijackyl wrote:
In Flames - Clayman (2000)


Great album, but 2000 still belongs to the 20th century, not the 21st. ;)
_________________
Zodijackyl wrote:
Anything but undying, eternal praise for Awaken the Guardian is completely wrong and a disgrace to you, your band, family, and Facebook friends list.


If you're interested in hearing my music, it can be found here: http://thiestru.bandcamp.com. Wassail.

Top
 Profile  
TheDefiniteArticle
Metalhead

Joined: Tue Oct 26, 2010 9:50 am
Posts: 401
Location: United Kingdom
PostPosted: Thu Aug 28, 2014 8:55 pm 
 

The only thing I can think of adding to what's already been said is the Wormphlegm demo, which pioneered the whole 'torture doom' movement. Maaaaaaaybe Vektor but I think that's pushing it.

Top
 Profile  
iiix
Metal newbie

Joined: Thu Jan 17, 2008 8:55 am
Posts: 153
Location: United States of America
PostPosted: Thu Aug 28, 2014 9:21 pm 
 

Bolt Thrower - Those Once Loyal

is the easiest pick for me. easy because its obvious?
_________________
GrimReapingDeath wrote:
who are you to judge whats metal and what isnt ? more importantly, why are you suck dicks ?

Top
 Profile  
ENKC
Veteran

Joined: Fri Feb 29, 2008 7:28 pm
Posts: 2731
Location: Australia
PostPosted: Thu Aug 28, 2014 9:27 pm 
 

Exigence wrote:
Isn't "Tempo of the Damned" lauded as the album that brought thrash back for the 2000s?

I can't say I've heard that said before. I have heard Hypnosia's Extreme Hatred (2000) cropping up as one of the best candidates for the start of the retro-thrash movement. It's certainly the earliest I've heard (along with their EP) that actively worshipped 80s thrash rather than being a natural extension of it. Those guys sound like they desperately wish they had been Kreator.

And someone mentioned Close to a World Below. That was the first album that occurred to me in this thread, but I can't agree with it. It's a highly respected entry in an established genre but I can't see that it pushed any boundaries or had widespread impact.
_________________
John_Sunlight wrote:
Gif logos are a rare and special thing. They should be reserved only for truly exceptional and rare and special and important bands, bands like Blind Guardian and... Blind Guardian. This should be in the rules.

Top
 Profile  
Ancient_Sorrow
Metalhead

Joined: Fri Feb 11, 2011 2:10 pm
Posts: 2215
Location: Scotland
PostPosted: Thu Aug 28, 2014 9:40 pm 
 

Nordland I by Bathory sticks out for me as one of the best records of its time. Of course, labelling something as a classic involves a lot of standing on the line between a "classic" and a "really good album"; however, I think Nordland I manages to be of the former, for it's near universal acclaim, and solidity even compared to the rest of Bathory's work.

I was going to mention Those Once Loyal for the same reason, but it's already been contributed above.
_________________
Heavy-Metal Spotlight: Reviews of the renowned and the obscure. Most Recently: Bunker 66 - Screaming Rock Believers
I drum haphazardly in: Nolti Nan Gana Nan Nolta -- "Death By The Venomhammer" EP available on Bandcamp

Top
 Profile  
volutetheswarth
Metalhead

Joined: Mon Mar 21, 2011 8:37 pm
Posts: 1483
Location: Australia
PostPosted: Thu Aug 28, 2014 11:23 pm 
 

InnesI wrote:
Tool - Lateralus. Some say Tool is not a metal band.

Lateralus is definitely one of the best progressive rock albums ever made.. But I can't buy the metal tag line.

My vote goes to a Portal album, I can't decide between Outre or Swarth though. I think Outre because it came before and really shined a light on their strange breed of metal. Outre seemed to be almost genre defining, not only the music but the odd rhythm timing also, I certainly had never heard anything exactly like it before. While Seepia featured mostly the same thing, due to the less than stellar production is came across as mostly noise.

Top
 Profile  
Twisted_Psychology
Veteran

Joined: Sat May 16, 2009 8:22 pm
Posts: 3004
Location: United States
PostPosted: Fri Aug 29, 2014 12:30 am 
 

I always feel like High On Fire could fit the bill for a modern classic band, if only for the multi-genre appeal on albums like Blessed Black Wings and De Mysteriis Vermis.

I've also felt that The Black Halo by Kamelot could be called a modern classic. It seemed to be a major player in the "dark power metal" movement of the mid-2000s, got them exposed to a wider audience, and has a scope that reminds me of a 21st century Operation: Mindcirme.

I do think there are also a bunch of albums that have been put out by older bands that will be seen as classics in their own right. Brave New World, Tempo of the Damned, and Monotheist are some examples that have mentioned but I would include Accept's Blood Of The Nations and Overkill's Ironbound among others.
_________________
Spirit Division (Blues Metal): http://spiritdivision.bandcamp.com
My blog: http://psychicshorts.blogspot.com

Top
 Profile  
Aydross
Metal newbie

Joined: Sun Feb 12, 2012 9:21 pm
Posts: 212
PostPosted: Fri Aug 29, 2014 1:31 am 
 

For new contributions to add:
Both Lost Horizon's, To the Nameless Dead, mmm Last Fair Deal Gone Down??
That's all I've got. I mean, they aren't super famous or anything, more like underground future classics.
_________________
...Don't turn out the lights
Cause there's demons in the night
And they prey on the fears in us all...

Top
 Profile  
joppek
Metalhead

Joined: Sun Jan 09, 2011 7:36 am
Posts: 925
Location: Suomi Finland Perkele
PostPosted: Fri Aug 29, 2014 2:30 am 
 

Thiestru wrote:
Zodijackyl wrote:
In Flames - Clayman (2000)


Great album, but 2000 still belongs to the 20th century, not the 21st. ;)


from the op: (and regarding the thread title; it doesn't really mean anything since "millenium" is a period of time rather than a point in it)

Smalley wrote:
I'm more interested in figuring out which 2000-onward releases will be revered



anyway, i agree with whoever mentioned those once loyal as well - like close to a world below, it was nothing new, but it's a pinnacle in a highly praised band's discography that will surely be revered for a long time. i wouldn't require a modern classic to be genre defying or anything (tho' there are those as well, such as portal's stuff) - we just won't get another master of puppets or reign in blood anymore, the metal domain has grown way too big and diverse for that to happen
so either we use a more relaxed definition for the word "classic", or we stop referring to any album from the past 20 years or so (and in to the future) as such
_________________
All the best bands are affiliated with Satan. -Bart Simpson

Top
 Profile  
CF_Mono
Metalhead

Joined: Thu Jul 08, 2010 5:21 pm
Posts: 1546
PostPosted: Fri Aug 29, 2014 2:48 am 
 

Kveldulfr wrote:
If this is 2000- onwards, then we have some already classic albums.

Probably Deathspell Omega's SMRC - if it's not already hailed as one.
Celtic Frost - Monotheist. Behemoth of an album and perfect way to end a career.
Satan - Life Sentence. It sounds classic already. Same for Hell - Human Remains.
Vital Remains - Dechristianize. Brutal as fuck with top notch performances. It made an impact when it was released.
Heaven and Hell - The Devil You Know. Dio's Last stand will reach the heavens.
Absu - Tara. It is already a landmark of the genre.
Arghoslent - Incorrigible Bigotry and Hornets of the Pogrom. Both albums are flawless executions of melodic death metak with perfect riffing, violent pace and epic atmosphere.
Deicide - The Stench of Redemption. One of the greatest comebacks from a forefather of death metal.
Triptykon - Eparistera Daimones. A giant of an album from one of the most legendary metal musicians ever. Impossibly heavy.
Dead Congregation - Graves of the Archangels. OSDM done to perfection; ominous atmosphere, brutal, evil... Like the 2000's Onward to Golgotha (keeping some proportions).
In the same way, Disma - Towards the Megalith will be hailed as a classic. Pillard's vocals are enough to put it above most of OSDM revival bands, but it also it's heavy and damn crushing.
Arckanum's ppppppppp.... All of them deserve full paragraphs of praise.

Damn, this guy gets it.

Ohh, totally seconding Nordland.
_________________
Doom or be doomed...
My current band. Wretched doom trio from NY.

Top
 Profile  
InnesI
Metal newbie

Joined: Sat Jun 01, 2013 3:19 pm
Posts: 268
PostPosted: Fri Aug 29, 2014 3:50 am 
 

I think the person mentioning Meshuggah is on to something. They are highly original and very influential for other bands and musicians. In a way they created the whole djent genre. The question is which album will get the honours. My favorites are probably Nothing and Catch 33 but I don't think the latter will be regarded as a classic. I think we need to go further back that Nothing however. I feel like it was Destroy Erase Improve that really got things going. Nothing may have defined and refined the sound but it was Destroy Erase Improvethat hit like a bomb.

Top
 Profile  
Expedience
Veteran

Joined: Wed Aug 27, 2008 4:22 am
Posts: 3767
PostPosted: Fri Aug 29, 2014 4:02 am 
 

InnesI wrote:
I think the person mentioning Meshuggah is on to something. They are highly original and very influential for other bands and musicians. In a way they created the whole djent genre. The question is which album will get the honours.


I (the EP). If you don't want to give it to an EP, then I suppose Nothing will do but it's undoubtedly not as good and not really a classic. I feel an EP is the perfect length for Meshuggah - and a breathless 20 minute bulldozer of a song at that.

On black metal, I think Windir's Likferd is well-regarded enough for classic status. Negura Bunget's 'n crugu bradului is monumental and also Nokturnal Mortum's Voice of Steel. Summoning and The Chasm also have 3 very good post-2000 albums, the only question is which is best.

Top
 Profile  
RepulsiveVenom
Metal newbie

Joined: Fri Jul 18, 2014 3:56 am
Posts: 107
Location: Australia
PostPosted: Fri Aug 29, 2014 5:48 am 
 

Would have to go with Inquisition - Magnificent Glorification Of Lucifer. I regard it as a classic and very unique. I'll be looking back at that album for decades.
_________________
Got some stuff for sale: viewtopic.php?p=2443930

Top
 Profile  
OlderBudweiser
Metal newbie

Joined: Wed Jan 30, 2008 1:50 am
Posts: 105
PostPosted: Fri Aug 29, 2014 9:34 am 
 

I really don't get it. It's maybe my age speaking, but ALMOST every album mentioned here, i'm pretty sure they will never reach the same classic status as for instance Overkill from Motorhead, Highway to hell from Ac/DC, The Number of the beast, Reign in blood, Master of Puppets, Peace Sells, Black Sabbath, and so on and so forth. These albums still be remembered in many many years to come, but the albums mentioned here? Think not. Would be a reason for it, didn't figured that out yet.

Top
 Profile  
joppek
Metalhead

Joined: Sun Jan 09, 2011 7:36 am
Posts: 925
Location: Suomi Finland Perkele
PostPosted: Fri Aug 29, 2014 10:06 am 
 

OlderBudweiser wrote:
I really don't get it. It's maybe my age speaking, but ALMOST every album mentioned here, i'm pretty sure they will never reach the same classic status as for instance Overkill from Motorhead, Highway to hell from Ac/DC, The Number of the beast, Reign in blood, Master of Puppets, Peace Sells, Black Sabbath, and so on and so forth. These albums still be remembered in many many years to come, but the albums mentioned here? Think not. Would be a reason for it, didn't figured that out yet.


i'm sure most people here (me included) agree with all of that... well, apart from no albums being remembered from this thread - they surely will, just not in the scale of the big old ones
and i recon the reason is the one i stated in my last post:
joppek wrote:
we just won't get another master of puppets or reign in blood anymore, the metal domain has grown way too big and diverse for that to happen
so either we use a more relaxed definition for the word "classic", or we stop referring to any album from the past 20 years or so (and in to the future) as such


what people are doing is using a more relaxed definition (most people anyway... probably)
_________________
All the best bands are affiliated with Satan. -Bart Simpson

Top
 Profile  
InnesI
Metal newbie

Joined: Sat Jun 01, 2013 3:19 pm
Posts: 268
PostPosted: Fri Aug 29, 2014 10:14 am 
 

OlderBudweiser wrote:
I really don't get it. It's maybe my age speaking, but ALMOST every album mentioned here, i'm pretty sure they will never reach the same classic status as for instance Overkill from Motorhead, Highway to hell from Ac/DC, The Number of the beast, Reign in blood, Master of Puppets, Peace Sells, Black Sabbath, and so on and so forth. These albums still be remembered in many many years to come, but the albums mentioned here? Think not. Would be a reason for it, didn't figured that out yet.


Albums that emerge during the rise of a musical genre will always be better remembered and have a bigger impact than those produced 40 years down the line. Its innevitable. But still albums are produced that are viewed, after some time, as classic albums.

I think we are far enough removed from everything until around 1995 to be able to determine what is a classic metal album from any time before that. Everything after 1995 is tougher and when we get as far into it as the 00's all we can do is to speculate. No one here will have the answer now. We will only know 10-20 years time.

What albums released after the year 2000 do you, OlderBudweiser, think perhapscould reach legendary status?

Top
 Profile  
TheDefiniteArticle
Metalhead

Joined: Tue Oct 26, 2010 9:50 am
Posts: 401
Location: United Kingdom
PostPosted: Fri Aug 29, 2014 10:29 am 
 

Expedience wrote:
InnesI wrote:
I think the person mentioning Meshuggah is on to something. They are highly original and very influential for other bands and musicians. In a way they created the whole djent genre. The question is which album will get the honours.


I (the EP). If you don't want to give it to an EP, then I suppose Nothing will do but it's undoubtedly not as good and not really a classic. I feel an EP is the perfect length for Meshuggah - and a breathless 20 minute bulldozer of a song at that.

On black metal, I think Windir's Likferd is well-regarded enough for classic status. Negura Bunget's 'n crugu bradului is monumental and also Nokturnal Mortum's Voice of Steel. Summoning and The Chasm also have 3 very good post-2000 albums, the only question is which is best.

I struggle to see any Meshuggah stuff as a metal classic since their later stuff isn't really metal and certainly nearly none of the stuff they influenced is.

Top
 Profile  
Expedience
Veteran

Joined: Wed Aug 27, 2008 4:22 am
Posts: 3767
PostPosted: Fri Aug 29, 2014 10:30 am 
 

InnesI wrote:
I think we are far enough removed from everything until around 1995 to be able to determine what is a classic metal album from any time before that. Everything after 1995 is tougher and when we get as far into it as the 00's all we can do is to speculate. No one here will have the answer now. We will only know 10-20 years time.


Why 10-20 years? I'm old enough to remember 1996 and Master of Puppets and Reign in Blood were definitely regarded as classics by then, after only 10 years. Shouldn't we at least know by now a few classic 2000- albums? Maybe it's the term "classic" which is outdated. It doesn't seem to mean the same thing as it used to do, or have the same significance.

Top
 Profile  
InnesI
Metal newbie

Joined: Sat Jun 01, 2013 3:19 pm
Posts: 268
PostPosted: Fri Aug 29, 2014 10:55 am 
 

Expedience wrote:
Why 10-20 years? I'm old enough to remember 1996 and Master of Puppets and Reign in Blood were definitely regarded as classics by then, after only 10 years. Shouldn't we at least know by now a few classic 2000- albums? Maybe it's the term "classic" which is outdated. It doesn't seem to mean the same thing as it used to do, or have the same significance.


I may be wrong but I think that the more time passes the harder it will be for a metal album to be regarded as a classic. Few albums will have the impact as those released in the 70's and the 80's in our genre. The further away from the birth of a genre the harder it will be to produce these classic stand out albums. My example was basically just me thinking out loud. I can easily name classic metal albums up until 1995 (roughly of course - give or take). After that it becomes considerably harder to distinguish. Not only has the metal genre spawned so many offsprings few will have the same impact as a Number of the Beast for example but the way music is consumed has also changed massively. This change probably started around 1995 or so in a small scale (that is when I remember I got access to the internet regularly for the first time) but accellerated very fast.

TheDefiniteArticle wrote:
I struggle to see any Meshuggah stuff as a metal classic since their later stuff isn't really metal and certainly nearly none of the stuff they influenced is.


Uhm ok... I can't see Meshuggah being anything but metal to be honest. I don't think they fit better into any other musical genre so metal it is. But please, if you think they are more akin to rock or pop please explain this so we'll all understand better.

Top
 Profile  
Zodijackyl
Lazy Wizard

Joined: Wed Apr 30, 2008 5:39 pm
Posts: 5019
Location: United States
PostPosted: Fri Aug 29, 2014 12:04 pm 
 

InnesI wrote:
I think the person mentioning Meshuggah is on to something. They are highly original and very influential for other bands and musicians. In a way they created the whole djent genre. The question is which album will get the honours. My favorites are probably Nothing and Catch 33 but I don't think the latter will be regarded as a classic. I think we need to go further back that Nothing however. I feel like it was Destroy Erase Improve that really got things going. Nothing may have defined and refined the sound but it was Destroy Erase Improvethat hit like a bomb.


It's an interesting situation, because from 2002, Nothing was somewhat notable, but it wasn't until they re-recorded it after their next album that it was was such a huge leap. The precise, low-tuned 8 strings and the samples straight outta Drumkit from Hell are pretty much what defined the djent sound, revisiting an album a few years earlier. They had chased that sound down another end with Catch Thirtythree though, with the programmed drums opening some strange doors for them. Perhaps obZen was the exposure breakthrough that launched the style though.

My argument against Meshuggah albums being classics would be that while their technique and sound was hugely influential, it often became iconic songs, not full albums, and their albums are very repetitive and repeat the same tricks.

Top
 Profile  
narsilianshard
Metalhead

Joined: Fri Aug 14, 2009 12:22 pm
Posts: 727
Location: Seattle
PostPosted: Fri Aug 29, 2014 1:49 pm 
 

Zodijackyl wrote:
My argument against Meshuggah albums being classics would be that while their technique and sound was hugely influential, it often became iconic songs, not full albums, and their albums are very repetitive and repeat the same tricks.


I completely agree. They definitely invented something new and started a new subgenre, they're just not an album band.
_________________
Currently working my way through the Hammers of Misfortune discography for MetalBandcamp.

Top
 Profile  
Metantoine
The XVI, dominar to over 258714 subjects

Joined: Sat Jun 21, 2008 5:00 pm
Posts: 8966
Location: Québec
PostPosted: Fri Aug 29, 2014 1:53 pm 
 

I think Destroy Erase Improve is definitely a classic in its own right, great album with an adventurous sound. After that, the band became a bit stale.
_________________
BasqueStorm everywhere wrote:
LOL!

Metantoine's Magickal Realm
Halberd (doom/death)

Top
 Profile  
Opus
Metalhead

Joined: Sun Sep 22, 2002 11:06 am
Posts: 1831
Location: Sweden
PostPosted: Fri Aug 29, 2014 4:19 pm 
 

Just as a mental exercise/effort to try and define a classic, what would a post-2000 classic pop/rock/anything album be?
Lady Gaga's The Fame? (I actually had to look up what the name of her first album was.) I got nothing!
_________________
Do the words Heavy Metal mean anything to you other than buttcore, technical progressive assgrind or the like?
Dudemanguy wrote:
Opus is pretty much the latest and greatest

Top
 Profile  
Unorthodox
Metalhead

Joined: Sun Mar 05, 2006 8:08 pm
Posts: 1217
PostPosted: Fri Aug 29, 2014 5:09 pm 
 

narsilianshard wrote:
Zodijackyl wrote:
My argument against Meshuggah albums being classics would be that while their technique and sound was hugely influential, it often became iconic songs, not full albums, and their albums are very repetitive and repeat the same tricks.


I completely agree. They definitely invented something new and started a new subgenre, they're just not an album band.


Metanoine wrote:
I think Destroy Erase Improve is definitely a classic in its own right, great album with an adventurous sound. After that, the band became a bit stale.


I always find myself sticking up for Meshuggah, but at the end of the day I realize they're just one of those bands that you enjoy or don't, no matter how much you try to "get it". Example; people complain about their repetitive nature... that's in fact something I really enjoy about them. They've managed to reduce all their songs down to a few simple ideas to be enjoyed by the average listener while simultaneously making them sound interesting for a lot of musicians by sneaking in poly-rhythmic meters and unorthodox time signatures. I can understand how for some people that would end up sounding simply monotonous and repetitive to have everything so bare bone and reduced to a few simple notes and notable grooves, but for me it's both fun and a bit of a mind fuck to listen to. To each its own, but nevertheless, their style was very unique with only a few bands having anything similar to them (Fellsilent, Four Question Marks, esc) until the whole djent wave took off in the mid 2000's. However, it's difficult to say if any of their post-millenium stuff can be considered "classic", as I feel the djent genre was actually influenced more by their later 90's material from Chaosphere. I would say that Catch ThirtyThree and I are classics for my personal library because of how their continuity is done perfectly, but I don't feel like either of these have really influenced the djent scene too much.
_________________
Last.fm

Top
 Profile  
Kveldulfr
Metalhead

Joined: Thu Feb 16, 2012 12:01 pm
Posts: 2451
Location: Chile
PostPosted: Fri Aug 29, 2014 8:52 pm 
 

Absolutely. Chaosphere was the catalyst to the Djent thing. Catch 33 was Meshuggah adapting to modern Djent.
_________________
Forestfather in Facebook- Some sort of black metal.
Get Forestfather's new album 'Hereafter' here!
Kveldulf's various stuff in Soundcloud
Vahşet in ReverbNation - Death metal

Top
 Profile  
Corpsey the Clown
Metal newbie

Joined: Sat Jun 18, 2011 7:38 pm
Posts: 221
Location: United States
PostPosted: Fri Aug 29, 2014 11:16 pm 
 

It's tough. You don't want to overuse the word "classic" for one thing, and more importantly it describes an album that has stood the test of time as something fans go back to again and again. There aren't a ton of post-millennium releases fitting that description. There are some I could suggest, although not enough time has passed for us to be sure.

One is Cannibal Corpse's 'Kill' (2006), which seemed to totally reinvigorate the band and solidify their modern style that has continued through 'Torture' and beyond. It was intense, angry, and smart with just the right amount of technicality. Make Them Suffer, Five Nails Through the Neck and Death Walking Terror are still so enjoyable that they're almost cliches.

I'm sure I'll think of a few more with time.

Top
 Profile  
IanThrash
Metalhead

Joined: Mon Dec 26, 2011 10:56 pm
Posts: 918
Location: Argentina
PostPosted: Sat Aug 30, 2014 12:38 am 
 

We had this particular discussion about "modern classics" a while ago. It finally became a debate about what is considered a classic, what parameters we should use to define a modern classic, why is it so hard to reach that status nowadays and a bunch of other interesting stuff. I'll try to list a few albums that, in my opinion, are extremely influential and have the potential to be classics (wheter you wanna use the old conception of "classic" or not)

Some of the albums that I wanted to list (Lateratus, Deathspell Omega, Mastodon, Alcest etc) have already been mentioned by another user so I'll try to avoid repetitions.

Ensiferum - s/t or Iron
Extremely influential to the folk movement. There is not a single folk metal fan that is not a fan of these albums to a certain degree. Lai Lai Hei is a legendary song already and I've seen at least five different folk bands covering it live.


Isis - Panopticon/Oceanic
Maybe I'm a little biased here as both these albums contain a couple of my all time favorite songs ever writen by a human. Isis deserves to be recognized as one of the greatest bands of this century.

((I'll update this when I think about other albums))

Also, to the one asking about influential/extemely big pop/rock albums of this century


Lady Gama - The Fame
The Strokes - Is This It
Coldplay - A Rush of Blood to the Head
Arcade Fire - Funeral
Muse - Absolution
Arctic Monkeys - Favourite Worst Nightmare
Amy Whinehouse - Back to Black
Daft Punk - Discovery (maybe even R.A.M?)

or some shit like that
_________________
Can´t touch this

Dude: If you tour, will you bring out other musicians? Use tapes? Clone yourselves?

Fenriz: I am up for cloning, but with less tinnitus and more chest hair, please.

Lastfm

Top
 Profile  
teh_Foxx0rz
Metal newbie

Joined: Tue May 20, 2014 9:38 am
Posts: 371
Location: United Kingdom
PostPosted: Sat Aug 30, 2014 5:39 am 
 

IanThrash wrote:
Ensiferum - s/t or Iron
There is not a single folk metal fan that is not a fan of these albums to a certain degree.

Me :D Rasping for 90% of the time gets really stale in a context softer than black metal.

Top
 Profile  
Eissari
Mallcore Kid

Joined: Fri Apr 04, 2014 11:38 am
Posts: 6
Location: Finland
PostPosted: Sat Aug 30, 2014 6:10 am 
 

Megadeth - Endgame

In my opinion one of the best albums by Dave and guys in long time.

Top
 Profile  
Turner
Metalhead

Joined: Fri Aug 23, 2002 2:04 am
Posts: 1252
Location: Germany
PostPosted: Sat Aug 30, 2014 6:38 am 
 

Eissari wrote:
Megadeth - Endgame

In my opinion one of the best albums by Dave and guys in long time.


i was actually surprised at how quickly the metal community as a whole glossed over this album. i'm not really a MASSIVE megadeth fan to start with (although i do of course worship at the altar of their pre-countdown stuff, etc etc) but as far as returns to form go, it blows the other big 3 thrash bands out of the water. yet i swear about a month after its release it was already obscure, while people who scream "SLAYER!" are still ranting about how good that piece of shit christ illusion is, or how metallica's new metallica-imitating-garage-bands-imitating-metallica's-first-album style is the second coming.

Top
 Profile  
joppek
Metalhead

Joined: Sun Jan 09, 2011 7:36 am
Posts: 925
Location: Suomi Finland Perkele
PostPosted: Sat Aug 30, 2014 7:27 am 
 

endgame was a great album, but i suspect people stopped talking about it largely because the "return to form" didn't last and their newest effort is utter shit
_________________
All the best bands are affiliated with Satan. -Bart Simpson

Top
 Profile  
DoomMetalAlchemist
Metalhead

Joined: Mon Dec 27, 2010 6:10 am
Posts: 533
Location: United States of America
PostPosted: Sat Aug 30, 2014 7:50 am 
 

As I was reading the OP, I had Reverend Bizarre's In the Rectory of the Bizarre Reverend in my head, but it's already been mentioned. But just to expand, it seems before that, most doom bands were doing the death/doom, funeral doom, or gothic doom thing, and then Reverend Bizarre put out a great album that influenced a ton of new old school sounding doom metal bands.

I didn't think of it myself, but as was already mentioned, Electric Wizard's Dopethrone is a classic, as it is massively popular and spawned a zillion imitators (even if I don't much like it myself).

One thing I just thought of is what about the movement of female-fronted doom metal/hard rock bands? As far as I know, Totem/Jex Thoth was the first to do it, but it was Blood Ceremony to really popularize it. But are either of them really well known enough?

And isn't it possible for an album to be considered a classic even if it didn't break much new ground? Going back to the 80s, was Dio's Holy Diver really all that ground breaking? But today it's considered a classic of the genre. Keeping this in mind, I'm thinking of Candlemass' King of the Grey Islands. A band very familiar with making classic and very influential albums in the 80s makes a very highly revered album in the new millennium. I even saw a lot of comments saying King of the Grey Islands was their best album, and the best place for a new fan to start.

Top
 Profile  
Whiskey_Bonbons
Metal newbie

Joined: Wed Apr 09, 2008 2:24 pm
Posts: 33
PostPosted: Sat Aug 30, 2014 9:07 am 
 

For me, Pagan Altar - Lords of Hypocrisy / Mythical & Magical
Can't decide between these two, but I think the latter is more unique.
The songs are relatively "old" and everything in these albums just screams "classic". Might not be highly influential per se, but definitely a milestone in the nwobhm/doom metal of the post-millennium.

Top
 Profile  
Yayattasa
Metalhead

Joined: Wed Dec 12, 2012 7:49 am
Posts: 587
Location: Brazil
PostPosted: Sat Aug 30, 2014 12:53 pm 
 

I'm sure Opeth Blackwater Park, Agalloch The Mantle and Electric Wizard Dopethrone are canonized as classics.
Can't say much about the other two, but Blackwater Park is probably the best album by the already well loved Opeth (believe it or not, Damnation is a close second for me). Released in 2001, it's praised by public and critics. It's consistent and well produced, and above all that it sounds quite inspired.

-----

What about Uncle Acid and the Deadbeats Blood Lust, Deathspell Omega Paracletus and Agalloch Marrow of the Spirit?

Also, while I'm sure my opinion doesn't count when we are discussing classics, I think two of my favourites, Esoteric The Maniacal Vale and Ne Obliviscaris Portal of I are on their way to be considered classics.
_________________
inhumanist wrote:
Arkhane wrote:
Damn, I thought this thread was headed for closure. Good save, whoever saved it but I'm too lazy to scroll up right now.

oh my god people disagreed on something for several pages stop the presses

Top
 Profile  
InnesI
Metal newbie

Joined: Sat Jun 01, 2013 3:19 pm
Posts: 268
PostPosted: Sat Aug 30, 2014 2:30 pm 
 

Yayattasa wrote:
What about Uncle Acid and the Deadbeats Blood Lust, Deathspell Omega Paracletus and Agalloch Marrow of the Spirit?


As far as Deathspell Omega goes I think Si Monumentum Requires, Circumspice is in the running but can't see Paracletus there. And for Agalloch Marrow of the Spirit is far from a classic. If you would have said The Mantle I would accept it as a nominee.

Top
 Profile  
Bishop_Drugsalot
Metal newbie

Joined: Sun Jun 10, 2012 10:42 am
Posts: 244
Location: Finland
PostPosted: Sat Aug 30, 2014 2:53 pm 
 

InnesI wrote:
If you would have said The Mantle I would accept it as a nominee.

Well, you know, he did.

Top
 Profile  
MorbidEarth
Metal newbie

Joined: Fri Sep 26, 2008 11:39 am
Posts: 318
PostPosted: Sat Aug 30, 2014 4:23 pm 
 

Taking into account both influence and relative popularity, I would say the following are good candidates for "post-millennium classics":

Converge - Jane Doe
Opeth - Blackwater Park
Tool - Lateralus
Electric Wizard - Dopethrone
Isis - Oceanic
Lamb Of God - As The Palaces Burn
Behemoth - Demigod
Mastodon - Leviathan

Top
 Profile  
Charlo
Metal newbie

Joined: Sun Sep 10, 2006 7:05 am
Posts: 153
Location: United States
PostPosted: Sat Aug 30, 2014 4:28 pm 
 

teh_Foxx0rz wrote:
While (Euro) power metal stretches back to at least '87, it only had its explosion from '97, so many of its "classics" are since 2000. Hall of the Olden King and Gates of Oblivion by Dark Moor, Dawn of Victory is still in Rhapsody's "classic" period even if Symphonic of Enchanted Lands is "the" classic; Freedom Call's Crystal Empire and Eternity; Highlord's When the Aurora Falls; Celesty's Reign of Elements...


I think it would be a stretch to call anything from Highlord or Celesty a "classic" - while they're excellent bands, they didn't blaze new trails (especially Highlord, who have been vanilla Italian power metal since day one). The Dark Moor and Rhapsody albums you mentioned will be remembered as classics, I agree with you on that.

Top
 Profile  
InnesI
Metal newbie

Joined: Sat Jun 01, 2013 3:19 pm
Posts: 268
PostPosted: Sat Aug 30, 2014 4:35 pm 
 

Bishop_Drugsalot wrote:
InnesI wrote:
If you would have said The Mantle I would accept it as a nominee.

Well, you know, he did.


Touché! :)

Top
 Profile  
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Reply to topic Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5  Next


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 21 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

 
Jump to:  

Back to the Encyclopaedia Metallum


Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group